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'The Sound of Music' live on NBC - Page 8

post #211 of 301
Wow, the updated numbers are now a 5.6 rating and 21.8 million viewers when DVRs are added.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/tv-ratings-nbcs-sound-music-667543
post #212 of 301
Yeah, that's a huge number. In spite of my criticisms of this show as a missed opportunity, if it brings about more live scripted television I'm all for it. Love to see a live version of American Playhouse - Rod Sterling did some writing for that show, didn't he? - or something in a dramatic genre as well.
post #213 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Yeah, that's a huge number. In spite of my criticisms of this show as a missed opportunity, if it brings about more live scripted television I'm all for it. Love to see a live version of American Playhouse - Rod Sterling did some writing for that show, didn't he? - or something in a dramatic genre as well.

Despite all the criticism the NBC production of The Sound of Music Live has received, it had some things going for it. First it starred a pop icon, Carrie Underwood, and a TV heart throb, Stephen Moyer, in a beloved warhorse of a musical. To sweeten the pot, NBC made it a live production and heavily promoted it. The end result was that, despite its deficiencies, the show was a success.
post #214 of 301
While the ratings success has encouraged them to continue with more productions, let's just hope they find talent better suited to it.
post #215 of 301
Today's news that Carly Rae Jepson ("Call Me Maybe") will be taking over the title role of Cinderella on Broadway made me wonder about the history of pop stars in high-profile musical theater. Here's one perspective: http://www.theguardian.com/stage/theatreblog/2012/apr/12/pop-stars-stage-ricky-martin

Then there's the relatively recent "jukebox musical" phenomenon -- Rock of Ages, Jersey Boys, Mama Mia -- a raft of shows that use pre-existing music and are probably cast more for their stars' ability to sing radio hits convincingly than to act (although it's interesting that the movie versions of such shows seem to lean more towards using real actors, even if they don't sing well).

My point is simply that the Carrie Underwood casting didn't happen in a vacuum. Tapping pop culture to invigorate legit theater productions is old news; after all, selling tickets is the point of the exercise on Broadway, not much different from getting good ratings on TV.
post #216 of 301
Another factor is that a lot of the singers probably starred in high school or church or community theater musicals. That's not at the same level as a professional production but it's not absolutely foreign to them.
Edited by hooked01 - 12/30/13 at 7:58pm
post #217 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdclark View Post

Today's news that Carly Rae Jepson ("Call Me Maybe") will be taking over the title role of Cinderella on Broadway made me wonder about the history of pop stars in high-profile musical theater. Here's one perspective: http://www.theguardian.com/stage/theatreblog/2012/apr/12/pop-stars-stage-ricky-martin

Then there's the relatively recent "jukebox musical" phenomenon -- Rock of Ages, Jersey Boys, Mama Mia -- a raft of shows that use pre-existing music and are probably cast more for their stars' ability to sing radio hits convincingly than to act (although it's interesting that the movie versions of such shows seem to lean more towards using real actors, even if they don't sing well).

My point is simply that the Carrie Underwood casting didn't happen in a vacuum. Tapping pop culture to invigorate legit theater productions is old news; after all, selling tickets is the point of the exercise on Broadway, not much different from getting good ratings on TV.

Thanks for the link to the interesting piece about the perils of casting pop stars in stage musicals. The bottom line to me is that, as you noted, the use of pop stars in musical theater productions, is a sensible bet,as NBC proved in spades with its casting of Carrie Underwood in its production of The Sound of Music Live. Although Underwood is certainly not much of an actress and her Oklahoma twang pops out from time to time, I think most would agree that she is a beautiful girl, has a wonderful voice, and knows how to sell a song.
post #218 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdclark View Post

Today's news that Carly Rae Jepson ("Call Me Maybe") will be taking over the title role of Cinderella on Broadway made me wonder about the history of pop stars in high-profile musical theater. Here's one perspective: http://www.theguardian.com/stage/theatreblog/2012/apr/12/pop-stars-stage-ricky-martin

Then there's the relatively recent "jukebox musical" phenomenon -- Rock of Ages, Jersey Boys, Mama Mia -- a raft of shows that use pre-existing music and are probably cast more for their stars' ability to sing radio hits convincingly than to act (although it's interesting that the movie versions of such shows seem to lean more towards using real actors, even if they don't sing well).

My point is simply that the Carrie Underwood casting didn't happen in a vacuum. Tapping pop culture to invigorate legit theater productions is old news; after all, selling tickets is the point of the exercise on Broadway, not much different from getting good ratings on TV.

Thanks for the link to the interesting piece about the perils of casting pop stars in stage musicals. The bottom line to me is that, as you noted, the use of pop stars in musical theater productions, is a sensible bet,as NBC proved in spades with its casting of Carrie Underwood in its production of The Sound of Music Live. Although Underwood is certainly not much of an actress and her Oklahoma twang pops out from time to time, I think most would agree that she is a beautiful girl, has a wonderful voice, and knows how to sell a song.

I agree that she knows how to sing a song, just not in a way which is necessary for musical theater.
post #219 of 301
In your opinion. She did fine on a live TV broadcast, not to be confused with an actual theatrical production. You are expecting way more than the average TV audience does, and NBC delivered to that audience.
post #220 of 301
As a singer, Underwood has great legs.
post #221 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

In your opinion. She did fine on a live TV broadcast, not to be confused with an actual theatrical production. You are expecting way more than the average TV audience does, and NBC delivered to that audience.

The reviews have been much more negative than positive.
post #222 of 301
The simple fact is that the wooden delivery of her lines kept pulling me out of the experience. Anything that distracts from the story enough to pull you out of it ruins it. In this case an otherwise incredible show, both from an artistic and a technical perspective (minus the audio hiss). Even her musical performance was very good. But again the delivery of her spoken words just totally distracted from the experience.
post #223 of 301
Again, in your opinion. The ratings disagree with you and with the critics, and I think she did fine especially when you consider that it was LIVE.

Some of that is the curiosity factor I'm sure.
post #224 of 301
It's fact that her wooden acting was a negative of the show. That does not contradict that ratings were high because she was in it. Plenty of people tuned into Geraldo opening Al Capone's safe. The safe was still empty, as were her lines of dialogue. (And yes I know, a whole lot more folks tuned into Carrie Underwood than Al Capone's safe, but my point is still valid.)
post #225 of 301
Seriously! You guys are still debating Carrie Underwood's performance on SOM? It was a live performance compared to a movie presentation that is considered the "standard'. Most of you probably don't even know, or remember, what live television was all about. Yeah, her acting could've certainly used some polish but all in all, it was a great job at a no-win comparison. Reviews are b.s. without knowing what the target group was. Besides, who cares. If you like it for what it was, then it was good performance.
post #226 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

Seriously! You guys are still debating Carrie Underwood's performance on SOM? It was a live performance

Yes, but not all of us watched it live… I mean, it's not exactly the kind of thing you need to watch immediately to avoid being spoiled, now, is it? (Wait, don’t tell me what happens with that whole Germany/Austria thing…)

I've only watched about half an hour so far – really HATE the hiss – and I reserve the prerogative to comment further after I see it all…

(Assuming I can actually tolerate the hiss for that long.)

Happy New Year!! smile.gif
post #227 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by mscottc View Post

It's fact that her wooden acting was a negative of the show.

I don't believe the word "fact" means what you seem to think it means.
post #228 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by joblo View Post

Yes, but not all of us watched it live… I mean, it's not exactly the kind of thing you need to watch immediately to avoid being spoiled, now, is it?

That's not the point he was making. The point is that the program was broadcast as it was being recorded, so there was no opportunity for the cast to do multiple takes to improve the final result.
post #229 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdclark View Post

I don't believe the word "fact" means what you seem to think it means.

Yep, gotta love it when opinions become 'facts'. Way too much of that on the intarwebs, as evidenced here.
post #230 of 301
As has been pointed out many times before, the audio presentation was terrible. Mixing, mic placement, types of mics used, etc certainly left a lot to be desired. However, that hasdnothing to do with Carrie Underwood's performance.
post #231 of 301
I've said from the top that Carrie is talented. But the teaser (previously recorded) showed me this project is out of her "comfort-zone", so I didn't tune in. Did I mention Ms. Underwood is talented?

Coming up next: NBC's live production of Mary Poppins, featuring Underwood once again. I jest, but I'd tune in to see how it turns out.
tongue.gif
post #232 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by rezzy View Post


Coming up next: NBC's live production of Mary Poppins, featuring Underwood once again. I jest, but I'd tune in to see how it turns out.
tongue.gif

Not me. Once was quite enough.
post #233 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by rezzy View Post

I've said from the top that Carrie is talented. But the teaser (previously recorded) showed me this project is out of her "comfort-zone", so I didn't tune in. Did I mention Ms. Underwood is talented?

Coming up next: NBC's live production of Mary Poppins, featuring Underwood once again. I jest, but I'd tune in to see how it turns out.
tongue.gif

What I would really like to see would be Carrie in a live (or any other kind for that matter) production of Annie Get Your Gun. Reba McEntire, another country music singer with Oklahoma roots, starred in a revival of the show on Broadway in 2001 and was sensational. In such a role, Carrie Underwood's southern twang would be an advantage. Her looks and singing ability wouldn't hurt either. smile.gif
post #234 of 301
I think what's being missed here is the fact that this was a live television event. Something that hasn't been done for a very long time. For me, it was more the event and not necessarily the content. Sure, it had warts and all but this was LIVE TELEVISION. For those of us who remember live, B&W tv, this was really cool especially with today's tv broadcasting abilities.
post #235 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

What I would really like to see would be Carrie in a live (or any other kind for that matter) production of Annie Get Your Gun.  …  In such a role, Carrie Underwood's southern twang would be an advantage.
The Broadway originator of the role (Ethel Merman), the original actress cast in the role in the film adaptation (Judy Garland), and the actress who finally starred in the movie (Betty Hutton) all had to fake their twangs.
post #236 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

I think what's being missed here is the fact that this was a live television event. Something that hasn't been done for a very long time. For me, it was more the event and not necessarily the content. Sure, it had warts and all but this was LIVE TELEVISION. For those of us who remember live, B&W tv, this was really cool especially with today's tv broadcasting abilities.

Who cares that it was live? Broadway performers (people with talent exceeding Carrie's) do every performance live.
post #237 of 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by HD-Master View Post

Who cares that it was live? Broadway performers (people with talent exceeding Carrie's) do every performance live.

I don't have to remind you of how highly I regard the talent of Broadway musical theater performers. They are the best. Period, paragraph, end of report. Still, there is a lot of difference between a live performance of a Broadway show, which is performed eight times a week, and a one time live performance for television on a sound stage surrounded by cameras, microphones and a bunch of production people, and producers who have millions invested in a one time event, but then I suspect you already knew that.

In the interest of full disclosure, I agree with your premise that at this time anyway, Carrie Underwood lacks the acting talent to be seriously considered for a leading role in any Broadway production. That's a shame, because she certainly has the beauty and musical ability. It's like the girl in A Chorus Line who sang, "I really couldn't sing," Carrie really couldn't act. smile.gif
post #238 of 301
^^^^ very well put, and I agree. It's too bad that some can't separate the difference between television, live television, and Broadway productions. Each certainly has its merits but sadly only one is hardly, if ever, done anymore.
post #239 of 301
That was my one and only point - live TV is not Broadway, and neither is the audience or its expectations. Can we all at least agree on that?
post #240 of 301
Don't know about all of us, but I agree.
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