or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › Wall Mount Wiring Best Practices
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Wall Mount Wiring Best Practices

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I can see that similar questions about how to wire a wall-mounted TV have been asked here, but I have scoured the threads and I'm not really finding what I'm looking for. If there's a better thread for this, please let me know.

I just put my 70" Vizio on the wall (thanks for the great deal Sams Club) and I would like to know what the best practices are for wiring it up. First off, this is in the finished part of my basement, but the back of this wall is unfinished so my options are pretty wide open. Here is what I'm working with:

I have 6 wires that will come from the TV:
- IR repeater
- 3 Wii-related cables, including component video and L/R RCA audio
- 2 HDMI cables
- TV power cord

I'm assuming that the best thing to do would be to split out the HDMI and other wires from the power wires by going with a split box like this - http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=105&cp_id=10425&cs_id=1042513&p_id=6933&seq=1&format=2 (with a box like this behind http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=105&cp_id=10425&cs_id=1042507&p_id=7020&seq=1&format=2)? The power cord from my TV isn't long enough to reach through the wall to the power strip anyway, so something will need to extend it. The only drawback to this is that I won't be able to plug my TV into my power strip (old Monster Cable power strip with a fuse, warranty, etc., very robust). Any thoughts on what is best? Other options I haven't considered?
post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by 27HoursLater View Post

I can see that similar questions about how to wire a wall-mounted TV have been asked here, but I have scoured the threads and I'm not really finding what I'm looking for. If there's a better thread for this, please let me know.

I just put my 70" Vizio on the wall (thanks for the great deal Sams Club) and I would like to know what the best practices are for wiring it up. First off, this is in the finished part of my basement, but the back of this wall is unfinished so my options are pretty wide open. Here is what I'm working with:

I have 6 wires that will come from the TV:
- IR repeater
- 3 Wii-related cables, including component video and L/R RCA audio
- 2 HDMI cables
- TV power cord

I'm assuming that the best thing to do would be to split out the HDMI and other wires from the power wires by going with a split box like this - http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=105&cp_id=10425&cs_id=1042513&p_id=6933&seq=1&format=2 (with a box like this behind http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=105&cp_id=10425&cs_id=1042507&p_id=7020&seq=1&format=2)? The power cord from my TV isn't long enough to reach through the wall to the power strip anyway, so something will need to extend it. The only drawback to this is that I won't be able to plug my TV into my power strip (old Monster Cable power strip with a fuse, warranty, etc., very robust). Any thoughts on what is best? Other options I haven't considered?


If I understand this the wall behind the Vizio is open and you can get back there.
As for the power from the power if you have a orange three wire out door drop cord that can be sacrificed by cutting and back wire into the Monoprice power receptacle The only thing is its strand wire and need's a clamp on u shape attachment to connect to the back of the receptacle. If you do not want to sacrifice a cord go to home depot and get a 12/2 romax, I think the shortest pre package is 15 feet long, and a male plug, there good ones for 5 or 6 bucks and make up your own
power cable, and because its solid copper you won't need the stake ons.

I think that i would use a single gang plastic box from the depot with a 15 amp out let for the power and then use a 2 gang plate for the other cables. also unless Vizio has changed the way they do things you'll see the power cord plugs in the back on the right side and all the A/V cables are on the far left. the best bet is to split every thing out so you do not have a lot of cables behind the set.
post #3 of 23
Use these:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003X1PIZU/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00193U3O0/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-107013-Voltage-Mounting-Bracket/dp/B004C4ZPMS/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1386178738&sr=1-1&keywords=low+voltage+mounting+bracket

You can do them in different configurations. Depending on what your existing wiring is match that 14/2 or 12/2 and tap into the closest existing outlet for the outlet behind the TV. If you want to use your power strip just use an extension cord, run it behind the wall and through a cable plate to your power strip.
Edited by colour - 12/4/13 at 9:51am
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

You can do them in different configurations. Depending on what your existing wiring is match that 14/2 or 12/2 and tap into the closest existing outlet for the outlet behind the TV. If you want to use your power strip just use an extension cord, run it behind the wall and through a cable plate to your power strip.
Are there any issues with interference when running a power cord through the same opening as the HDMI cables? I'm not all THAT worried about it, but I'd rather design this the best way possible while I'm working on it.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by 27HoursLater View Post

Are there any issues with interference when running a power cord through the same opening as the HDMI cables? I'm not all THAT worried about it, but I'd rather design this the best way possible while I'm working on it.

I wouldn't run them together or parallel, they have to cross if they do but I would just keep them separate through 2 different cable plates. If you can just separate them between the stud cavities. In your case since you have access all you have to do is staple the power cord to one of the studs and keep the other cables zip tied and separate from the power cord.

If you install an outlet behind the TV you can't use the low voltage mounts, you have to use a box. And by staples I mean electrical staples.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

I wouldn't run them together or parallel, they have to cross if they do but I would just keep them separate through 2 different cable plates. If you can just separate them between the stud cavities. In your case since you have access all you have to do is staple the power cord to one of the studs and keep the other cables zip tied and separate from the power cord.

If you install an outlet behind the TV you can't use the low voltage mounts, you have to use a box. And by staples I mean electrical staples.
Thanks for your help!
post #7 of 23
Here's more food for thought...
Since the wall is open, install some PVC as a conduit for all of your low voltage cables. That way you can remove or add wires after you're all buttoned up. Also run some "pull strings".

For electrical, pay someone (licensed) to do it right.
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

Here's more food for thought...
Since the wall is open, install some PVC as a conduit for all of your low voltage cables. That way you can remove or add wires after you're all buttoned up. Also run some "pull strings".

For electrical, pay someone (licensed) to do it right.

Why would he need pull strings? He has access to the back. The conduit is a waste of time also. You don't have to be licensed to do it right.
post #9 of 23
Sorry, I'll clarify.

1) a conduit is not a waste of time if you have some experience and foresight.
2) add some "pull strings" into the conduit for all of the low voltage needs. That way, if you need to "ADD" a new cable, it's very easy. Once the drywall (or whatever) is up.... it's not as easy to run new wiring.
3) for high voltage wiring, if you're asking here... you need to second guess and take caution with recommendations.

Just showing your insurance adjuster a link to this thread after your house burns down may not justify a claim payment. wink.gif
post #10 of 23
Wiremold makes a power cable kit that works very well. It uses Romex cable so it's code compliant and includes the hole saw and the fish tape (rod). Make sure that the signal cables (HDMI, etc.) are rated (CL2) for in-wall use.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/flat-panel-tv-cord-and-cable-power-kit/3600475.p?id=1218417733690&skuId=3600475&st=WireMold Power Cable kit&cp=1&lp=1#tab=overview

Shop around for prices... kit was recently available at Home Depot for $30.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

Sorry, I'll clarify.

1) a conduit is not a waste of time if you have some experience and foresight.
2) add some "pull strings" into the conduit for all of the low voltage needs. That way, if you need to "ADD" a new cable, it's very easy. Once the drywall (or whatever) is up.... it's not as easy to run new wiring.
3) for high voltage wiring, if you're asking here... you need to second guess and take caution with recommendations.

Just showing your insurance adjuster a link to this thread after your house burns down may not justify a claim payment. wink.gif

In this case with the OP having access to the rear of the wall both of your recommendations are a waste of time. What's he gonna do tie the pull string to the cable walk around and pull the string, he can feed both ends from the back of wall, DUH. And your statement about high voltage wiring is ridiculous, I don't recommend anyone do electrical work if they do not know what they are doing. As for an insurance claim the only person that would be in trouble for faulty wiring would be a licensed contractor. I am a remodeling contractor and some of the best work is done by unlicensed people and I've seen inspectors pass some of the most questionable work by licensed contractors. Anyone can walk into a home improvement store and purchase whatever they desire to do electrical work. Common sense says do your research and do it right and it doesn't take a license to accomplish that..
Edited by colour - 12/5/13 at 12:40pm
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by turnbowm View Post

Wiremold makes a power cable kit that works very well. It uses Romex cable so it's code compliant and includes the hole saw and the fish tape (rod). Make sure that the signal cables (HDMI, etc.) are rated (CL2) for in-wall use.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/flat-panel-tv-cord-and-cable-power-kit/3600475.p?id=1218417733690&skuId=3600475&st=WireMold Power Cable kit&cp=1&lp=1#tab=overview

Shop around for prices... kit was recently available at Home Depot for $30.

He doesn't require any of that, the wall is open on the opposite side.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

He doesn't require any of that, the wall is open on the opposite side.

He doesn't need to fish the cables, but the wiring should be code-compliant (Romex for power, etc.).
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by turnbowm View Post

He doesn't need to fish the cables, but the wiring should be code-compliant (Romex for power, etc.).

The only thing that has to meet code is the outlet if he installs one, he doesn't need in wall wiring. The only thing he needs to do is keep the wires and cable inside the stud cavities and attached to the studs.This is an open wall as long as the outlet is code and he doesn't have wires and cables blowing in the wind he's fine.
post #15 of 23
To the OP:

Used car salesmen use a similar pitch/tactic. Be careful and consider some of the recommendations for futureproofing and depending on your expertise, safety. wink.gif
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

What's he gonna do tie the pull strin to the cable walk around and pull the string, he can feed both ends from the back of wall, DUH.

You really have no idea what I'm suggesting do you? Duh? eek.gif
Edited by Ratman - 12/5/13 at 12:32pm
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

To the OP:

Used car salesmen use a similar pitch/tactic. Be careful and consider some of the recommendations for futureproofing and depending on your expertise, safety. wink.gif

I would trust a used car salesmen over your advice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

You really have no idea what I'm suggesting do you? Duh? eek.gif

I know exactly what you are suggesting no matter what you think it's a moronic idea that wouldn't even work with the material the OP plans on using. You don't have any idea what you are talking about. You'd like to think so but you don't.

To the OP PM me with any questions I'll tell you exactly what needs to be done, I'm done on this thread.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

I am a remodeling contractor and some of the best work is done by unlicensed people ...
To the OP:
You've been warned from a "moron:" . biggrin.gif
The rest is up to you.


Here's an example where a conduit would have made life easier if done when the walls were open:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdjer View Post

I think this question has been asked before but I can't tell that it's been answered. So, here goes. I built a house 12 years ago and had it wired for what was current at the time. In my great room I have all of my components in cabinets on the left of my fireplace, and my TV is in cabinets to the right of the fireplace. I bought a new HDTV yesterday and the cable company is coming out next week to upgrade everything. Here's my challenge: My new receiver has HDMI inputs for my DVD player, Apple TV and the new HD cable box. The output should be HDMI to the TV, but the only cable that runs from the component cabinet to the TV is coax, and it'd be impossible to pull an HDMI cable through the wall behind the fireplace. I was told there is a device that converts coaxial to HDMI on both ends...in other words, the HDMI output from the receiver would plug into this device, which would connect via the existing coax to another device at the TV, which would then output HDMI to the TV. I was told it's about $500. Does this make sense? Is there anything cheaper?

Edited by Ratman - 12/5/13 at 2:23pm
post #19 of 23

Mounting a TV can be a quick & easy task, but it can very easily turn into an arduous journey. In essence, the process involves putting 4 bolts in the wall to hold a bracket. You then hang the TV on that bracket and, you’re done. Sounds simple, right? But putting 4 bolts into a wall isn’t always as simple as it may sound.

post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
I appreciate all the thoughts. Colour is right: that side of the wall is unfinished and it's going to stay that way. The only way that would change is if we knocked out the wall entirely because that area is narrow and used for storage. We already have a full bathroom down there, and a larger unfinished section that we COULD finish at a later date, but this particular spot will never be finished unless we change the layout of the entire basement (which wouldn't happen for at least 10 years).

I just needed to know what kind of interference I'd get from the power and HDMI cables going through the same wall plate, but it sounds like if I have a 2-gang plate I'll have plenty of room to avoid interference. Thanks for all the help and concern, that's why if I want REAL advice I come here.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by 27HoursLater View Post

I appreciate all the thoughts. Colour is right: that side of the wall is unfinished and it's going to stay that way.

Assuming the wall would eventually be finished was the reason for the moronic, waste of time and other suggestions of which I do not know what I'm talking about.
Do whatever suits your needs. Since the wall will remain open, even if you have issues, you can reroute/add/delete as needed.
post #22 of 23
amusing how a simple question can turn into a pissing contest.
post #23 of 23
Heh...
Gotta love the internet and forums. Everyone needs help, everyone's an "expert", provide a suggestion or disagree and you become a moron. tongue.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: LCD Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › Wall Mount Wiring Best Practices