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Building the Perfect Silent HTPC (2013) - Page 7

post #181 of 210
I love the professional view to the fan vs fanless. debate. smile.gif
post #182 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcain View Post

I love the professional view to the fan vs fanless. debate. smile.gif

Agreed. Excellent post. I try to explain this to people all the time. The bottom line is that for *many/most* people a single quality fan isn't going to be heard much above the ambient noise in the house. You have to decide if the considerable expense to go completely fanless is worth it.
post #183 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by assassin View Post

Agreed. Excellent post. I try to explain this to people all the time. The bottom line is that for *many/most* people a single quality fan isn't going to be heard much above the ambient noise in the house. You have to decide if the considerable expense to go completely fanless is worth it.

You can also do both, use passive cooling but give it some help with some fans. My experience is usually the speed of the fan has the most to do with the amount of noise it makes. At a certain point there is "sound" to air moving. Moving more air or moving it faster makes more noise- so I don't care if you buy the most expensive best and most quiet fan on the market- if you spin it fast enough it will be heard and it will possibly be louder than a much cheaper fan spinning slower. By running fans on low speeds and using decent quality silent style fans (not the most expensive like Nexus, but not the cheapest, --...the high value ones in between that are designed to be affordable and quiet) is often the very best option for a budget friendly solution that is reasonable. This approach seems to work best with decent style PC or HTPC cases that have a good design for air flow and cooling inherent to them, where you don't need to move tons of air or fight against the force of physics to make it happen. Hot air wants to go up and out... just a little help with a quiet fan and a good design case to aid in this is often all you need.

You can get a decent bang for your buck choosing an affordable but quiet style fan, slowing it down some, and choosing components and setting them up so they don't require tons of cooling power. This is the best compromise I have found to not spending tons, and not getting tons of noise.

Beyond this things can get harder and harder to get each incrementally smaller step of improvement, and also get incrementally more expensive. Usually the high value option is quiet enough for 95% of the people and set up situations, but if you were someone who spent a ton of money building his theater with DD+GG, putty on your outlets, double walls, clips on ceiling, double sub floor with rubber mat between, and whatever else you need to do for an ultra low noise floor (much lower than a normal house) you are probably that 5% of people that wants a little quieter (or dead silent).

I think it's actually easier in many cases to just locate the HTPC inside a sound proof box, sound damped AV closet, or simply another room. Most people who do the treated sound proofed room already have a solid plan for their equipment, usually in another room, behind a wall, or inside a sound dead AV closet because most power amps, AVR's cable boxes, DirectTV boxes and other stuff also has fans in them and you can hear them. I'm confident I can make a nearly dead silent (quieter than an AVR or cable box or AMP) with most decent HTPC cases and some cheap ($25 or less) brand name silent fans. I agree with you both that this is usually enough for most people. (most)
post #184 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

You can also do both, use passive cooling but give it some help with some fans. My experience is usually the speed of the fan has the most to do with the amount of noise it makes.

Good call, my system is all passive with a single fan spinning at reduced speed. I really cant hear it all from my couch but if I walk over 1 foot away I can hear it just a little.

The thing I do hear is the AT&T Uverse PVR box, that thing is loud and I can always hear it.
post #185 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by roman schepis View Post

Good call, my system is all passive with a single fan spinning at reduced speed. I really cant hear it all from my couch but if I walk over 1 foot away I can hear it just a little.

The thing I do hear is the AT&T Uverse PVR box, that thing is loud and I can always hear it.

You can probably swap out that fan too biggrin.gif
post #186 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

You can probably swap out that fan too biggrin.gif

Hey, that is a great idea!

Don't want to get too far off subject, I'll do some poking around to see what mods to the Uverse box others have done.
post #187 of 210
They are almost always 80mm standard fans. You can swap them out with something like this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103081

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835352004

about $8 for any normal "silent" fan would work fine. Slow it down a bit would make it even quieter.
post #188 of 210
I would suggest spending a bit more, and replacing the fans with these: http://noctua.at/main.php?show=productview&products_id=57&lng=en
I replaced all the fans in my system with Noctuas over the weekend, and those are the quietest of the lot. (and replacing everything in the case with Noctuas made a significant difference to the noise levels)

At 1200rpm they are rated at 17.8 dBA, which is reasonable for that speed.
When you use the low noise adapter to reduce the speed to 900rpm they are rated for 10.7 dBA, which is extremely quiet. The new Mac Pro which reviews are calling "silent" is rated for 12 dBA at idle.
Using PWM, these fans are able to spin as low as 300rpm, at which point they are going to be inaudible in all but the quietest rooms.

And Noctua's PWM driver IC really works. These are the only PWM fans I have used which do not produce annoying noises at low RPMs. (ticking or whining for example) At low RPMs, nothing compares to Noctua fans.
Previously I would have chosen higher RPM voltage-controlled fans over any other PWM fan due to the annoying noises that they produce.


I think at some point, I will move to networked storage and build a PC using all passive components simply as a media player as Mfusick suggested, but I'd fit those fans on the intakes/exhaust of the case.
You won't hear them running, and they will help prolong the life of your hardware - components like motherboards may be fanless, but they are not designed to be passively cooled - it's expected that there is airflow moving over them from your case fans/cpu fans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

They are almost always 80mm standard fans.
120mm is standard on modern cases, though Noctua do have a PWM controlled 80mm fan as well: http://noctua.at/main.php?show=productview&products_id=45&lng=en&set=1
post #189 of 210
he is talking about his cable box being noisy... ^

I doubt it has 120mm fans or he wants to spend Noctua money on it. (overpriced)

I was thinking $10 or less just to make it acceptably quiet.
post #190 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

he is talking about his cable box being noisy... ^
I doubt it has 120mm fans or he wants to spend Noctua money on it. (overpriced)
I was thinking $10 or less just to make it acceptably quiet.
Sorry, I managed to skip over that. I doubt something like that is using PWM control anyway, so it would not be worthwhile buying their PWM fans. However, things can only get as quiet as your loudest component, so I would still buy Noctua fans if you plan on replacing it.
post #191 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by laverdure View Post

I've had the GD-06 (same as GD-05) and now use the GD-08 so I'll chime in:

Other than the size, no other difference I can think of, but the size difference as several consequences, which may or may not matter to you depending on what you plan on putting in there:

- GD-08 is taller and can accommodate taller CPU heatsink
- GD-08 is longer and can accommodate longer expansion cards (eg GPU)
- GD-08 can fit more HDDs.
- GD-08 can fit full ATX motherboard (more options/choice/features than mATX in GD-05 although still plenty to choose from)
- GD-08 overall bigger volume so better air circulation

This may not matter if you plan on using stock CPU heatsink, won't use discrete GPU and/or won't put more than 2-3 HDDs in your case. If so, GD-05 will be perfectly fine.

But for me, once I added a discrete GPU and more than 3 HDDS, air circulation was greatly diminished in the GD-06 and things were running a little hot (hot = loud). I went with the GD-08 and I could not be happier. I have 10 TB of storage (four 3.5" HDs), a great noctua CPU cooler, a GTX 660 and things stay cool and quiet.

Good luck!

You have any pics of the inners of your GD08 case, sorry if they're up on here already haven't been on this thread for a few weeks now, Thanks

Djoel
post #192 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Djoel View Post

You have any pics of the inners of your GD08 case, sorry if they're up on here already haven't been on this thread for a few weeks now, Thanks

Djoel

Did not have pics in this thread or an other, so here you go. Hope the OP won't mind...

I'm not the greatest photograph..and not the greatest pc builder. In fact, it was my very first build. But I have been at it for a year now lol...









post #193 of 210
WOW thanks that looks beautiful indeed, I initially was wondering about you CPU cooler along with you Graphic Card how things were looking inside your GD08 case, you've done a marvelous job.
A few more questions, did you utilize both optical drives? Did you experience any front flap issues?

Are those Molex to Sata adapter cables on your hhds?

Thanks for sharing


Djoel
post #194 of 210
I have a GD-05 and I couldn't fit the ASUS 7870 in it which is 4.25 inches tall. Ended up not mattering because the card was DOA but it made me put off on upgrading my card until I build a new system soon. Was thinking on building it in the Fractal Design Node 605 but then I read this review and quickly changed my mind.
Quote:
Compared to the Fractal Design Node 605 we reviewed recently, there's simply no contest — the GD08 absolutely crushed it. The smaller Node 605 had great difficulty keeping our test system stable, requiring both of its fans to run at maximum speed and the video card fan to spin almost twice as fast. Even then the CPU temperature was 18°C higher and the noise level was through the roof.

Will probably go for the GD07 over the GD08 though, cleaner faceplate.
post #195 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Djoel View Post

WOW thanks that looks beautiful indeed, I initially was wondering about you CPU cooler along with you Graphic Card how things were looking inside your GD08 case, you've done a marvelous job.
A few more questions, did you utilize both optical drives? Did you experience any front flap issues?

Are those Molex to Sata adapter cables on your hhds?

Thanks for sharing


Djoel

Yeah, regarding the GPU and that cooler, this is where I was glad I went for an ATX motherboard: the GPU had to be placed in the third PCI slot away from the cpu. It is the second of two PCI Express 3.0 slots, the first one being right next to cpu and that would not have worked.

No, I'm only using one optical drive. The cables you see above the optical drive (top OD slot of the two) go to the SSD and a 1TB 2.5" HDD. Wanted to keep WMC recording, WMC Live TV buffer and MCEBuddy scratch disk off my storage drives, so that's what that little HDD is for.

No front flap issue per se, little trial and error to align button on case with button on OD, little clunky and noisy when it opens/closes, but it works all the time, no problem there.

Not a molex to sata, just a sata power splitter basically. Perfect for those drives all lined up and reduces cable clutter. It's this: CP-06
post #196 of 210
Here is a picture of my almost all passive cooled system. There is only 1 fan and it is integrated into the Raid cage. I have the speed reduced with a resistor.

If you have not seen the FX100, that thing is a beast, a lot larger than I expected but it controls the i7 temp pretty good and is 0 db.

The Roswill PDU does not put off too much heat, I am pretty happy with it overall.
post #197 of 210
That looks pretty nice biggrin.gif ^
post #198 of 210
REALLY nice builds !!

I just bought 2 of the GD08s . Great case Lots of room and huge amount of possibilities from htpc , standard home pc , server pc or full on gaming rig .

The two draw backs with this case for me was the lack of any and I mean absolutely NO cable management abilities built in .

The button and alignment procedure for the 5.25 drive door is a pita !
post #199 of 210
flocko I have not seen you around in a while... How are ya ? And what are you doing with those GD08's ?
post #200 of 210
Easy DIY SILENT, FANLESS HTPC.

Here's my new HTPC that will be replacing my current non-silent, non-fanless HTPC. My TV tuner is a Ceton infiniTV6 ETH located in the basement. TV is recorded on the SSD, then automatically moved to the Windows Home Server 2011 box that's also located in the basement. Did I happen to mention that this HTPC is FANLESS and totally SILENT?

Hardware:

MSI Z87M-G43 motherboard
Intel 4th Gen Core i3 4330T 3.0GHz 35W HD4600 4MB Dual Core CPU
Prolimatech PRO-SAM17 Samuel 17 CPU Cooler
picoPSU-150-XT + 102W Adapter Power Kit
Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 250GB MZ-7TE250BW SSD
Silverstone ML04B case





Mike Fields
post #201 of 210
Why 4 sticks of ram ?
post #202 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Why 4 sticks of ram ?

Unfortunately, I order 2 2GB sticks before I found out that the Ceton infiniTV6 needs 8GB, so I got 2 more.
post #203 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by cs51762 View Post

Unfortunately, I order 2 2GB sticks before I found out that the Ceton infiniTV6 needs 8GB, so I got 2 more.

That makes sense biggrin.gif I actually thought you had 16GB.
post #204 of 210
Deleted.
post #205 of 210
post #206 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Anyone ever tried something like this?

What kind of monstrosity is that? What case would that even fit inside?
post #207 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dropkick Murphy View Post

What kind of monstrosity is that? What case would that even fit inside?

Most ATX cases like Grandia, or any midtower or full tower desktop biggrin.gif

I could fit 4 of those in quad SLI in my desktop tongue.gif Little cases and GPU cards don't get along well. Little cases are for the low performance crowd that is satisfied with basic video playback.

I think you can probably relocate a GPU card horizontally too with an adapter. That might be an option in a half height case. I bet you could even run the HDMI wire to the inside of the machine if you had to in a some custom set up. But usually most GPU users choose a case like the GD08 so it just fits like the OP
post #208 of 210
Does the MadVR in Jriver do the new line doubling like the latest build of MadVR ?
post #209 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Does the MadVR in Jriver do the new line doubling like the latest build of MadVR ?
I think the next release will include the updated version of madVR now that the problems with Nvidia cards have been fixed.
post #210 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

I think the next release will include the updated version of madVR now that the problems with Nvidia cards have been fixed.

Ok so it does update regularly ... biggrin.gif
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