or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › Sharp Led one side a bit duller than the other, please help!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sharp Led one side a bit duller than the other, please help!

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I just bought a new Sharp 60 Inch LED SMART TV and after several adjustments the right side of the picture seems to be a bit duller than the left, it was really bad but then I set all the color temp setting back to 0, which really helped. Since tweaking the settings helped my guess is this is not a hardware problem. In fact this may be in my head because I am so OCD about my display. Just wondering what setting would deal with the brightness of one side of the display or the other? If not just tell me I am crazy!

Thanks!-Brad
post #2 of 18
Its likely just bad uniformity. The right side of my TV is a tad duller than the left one, but it was built by Samsung. AFAIK Sharp TVs are not the greatest and the one you got has uniformity issues. Not much you can do about it other than get a different set or have this one replaced with the same model to see if its any better.

Do you see it when there are many colors in a picture or just when you look at a single color? Its less noticeable when things are moving.
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbell21 View Post

I just bought a new Sharp 60 Inch LED SMART TV and after several adjustments the right side of the picture seems to be a bit duller than the left, it was really bad but then I set all the color temp setting back to 0, which really helped. Since tweaking the settings helped my guess is this is not a hardware problem. In fact this may be in my head because I am so OCD about my display. Just wondering what setting would deal with the brightness of one side of the display or the other? If not just tell me I am crazy!

Thanks!-Brad

is your viewing position exactly dead center and perpendicular to the screen? off-axis, one side will often wash out before the other
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Monarch would you chalk this up to a problem in the set or just a problem with the LED TV in general. To the naked eye it is not noticeable in fact I am the only one in my home that notices it, keep in mind I am coming from a Samsung Plasma! It is more noticeable when things are moving as opposed to still, for example when watch the NFL on Fox one side of the field looks a tinge bit duller, however when the guys are in the Studio it is barely noticeable. Maybe even the Sun is coming in from the right side of the field and that's it who knows.

Thanks for your input!-Brad
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
I would say my seating position is a few more inches to the left than the right. Could this be the issue? I am also closer to the TV than I would like to be to one that big, probably around 10 feet away which will not be the case when I move from my apartment to my house later this year.

Thanks Bud!-Brad
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbell21 View Post

I would say my seating position is a few more inches to the left than the right. Could this be the issue? I am also closer to the TV than I would like to be to one that big, probably around 10 feet away which will not be the case when I move from my apartment to my house later this year.

Thanks Bud!-Brad

try seeing if sitting closer to the to other side causes the opposite side to wash out instead
post #7 of 18
If you can still see it while being 100% perpendicular to its center, then it is uniformity. But yeah, LCDs, LED lit or not, do tend to have uniformity problems. Some more than others. If it does bother you - get it replaced or you will sit and think about it the whole time and not enjoying yourself. I notice it on mine but only on a white background, never on any other background. Why did you switch from Plasma? Its way better tech!
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hard to judge based on my room going to the right, however when I moved back and to the center it really was not noticeable. So I am guessing nothing is wrong with the set? Which besides this uneven color issue, after a ton of settings twinkling I love !

Thanks-Brad
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
I switched from plasma to have piece of mind about gaming and leaving my TV on Sportscenter and the News in the background, I still have the Plasma but this LED is now my main TV!
post #10 of 18
You mean burn ins are that bad? Plasma TVs have better response times and input lag, so gaming should be better with them AFAIK...
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonarchX View Post

You mean burn ins are that bad? Plasma TVs have better response times and input lag, so gaming should be better with them AFAIK...
if you use the pixel orbiter, use reasonable picture settings, don't leave the same static logo or hud on for many hours, and run the pixel flipper or the slides for about 15 mins after long gaming or tv watching sessions, you'll be fine. With plasmas, it's best to prevent persistent ir rather than spend hours or even days trying to get rid of it.
post #12 of 18
My s60 has about 750 hours on it and as long as the pixel orbiter is on, I have no ir problems with normal use. This includes gaming sessions that can sometimes be around 5 hours or so. I've only had persistent ir 3 times since I got the set in late September and it was when the pixel orbiter was off and I had the same bright white logo/text on the screen for too long.
post #13 of 18
Is this TV edge-lit (very thin profile) or does it have an LED array behind the panel? If it is edge-lit, you're pretty much stuck... that means there is 1 row of LEDs along one edge of the TV and an extremely difficult to design diffuser tries to move that light from one edge across the entire screen and in my experience, they always fail causing visible :"clouds" on black screens and potentially visible variations in images.

If the TV has an array of LEDs behind the panel, illumination should be far more uniform and you should not be detecting anything obviously wrong with illumination. LED array TVs are usually a little thicker than the thinnest models and tend to cost more.

If the TV is edge lit, you probably wouldn't get much guff trying to return it and exchange it for a model that has a LED array behind the panel... of course that probably means spending more.

If the non-uniformity is measurable, they may have a specification for it and a technician could measure how bad it is and they might replace if if it is outside their spec. But usually their spec favors them so much that one side of the TV would probably have to be almost dark for the manufacturer to replace it.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

Is this TV edge-lit (very thin profile) or does it have an LED array behind the panel? If it is edge-lit, you're pretty much stuck... that means there is 1 row of LEDs along one edge of the TV and an extremely difficult to design diffuser tries to move that light from one edge across the entire screen and in my experience, they always fail causing visible :"clouds" on black screens and potentially visible variations in images.

If the TV has an array of LEDs behind the panel, illumination should be far more uniform and you should not be detecting anything obviously wrong with illumination. LED array TVs are usually a little thicker than the thinnest models and tend to cost more.

If the TV is edge lit, you probably wouldn't get much guff trying to return it and exchange it for a model that has a LED array behind the panel... of course that probably means spending more.

If the non-uniformity is measurable, they may have a specification for it and a technician could measure how bad it is and they might replace if if it is outside their spec. But usually their spec favors them so much that one side of the TV would probably have to be almost dark for the manufacturer to replace it.

Doug thank so much for responding, here are the specs from SHARP: http://www.sharpusa.com/ForHome/HomeEntertainment/LCDTV/Models/LC60LE755U.aspx?tech_specs=1

Looks like it is edge lit, so if what I am seeing is barely noticeable, I am guessing that the way is the edge lighting is, huh? In other words their is nothing wrong with the set, just my eyes getting used to the adjustment from a Samsung Plasma to an edge lit LED? If you have the time please respond to let me know if my understanding is correct.

Thanks and Happy Holidays!-Brad
post #15 of 18
To be VERY blunt... edge lit LED backlight systems suck. I personally would never own one unless it was a smaller size screen... like maybe less than 40" diagonal. And then, it would only be for casual use in a bedroom or study or sitting room, not for any critical viewing.

If you purchased the set from a retailer with a return policy and you find yourself not happy with the image, it would certainly be your right to return the TV if you were willing to pay more for a TV with an LED array behind the screen which will have much more uniform illumination. There are two kinds of 'behind-the-screen' LED arrays... white LEDs or 3-color, red, green, blue LEDs. If you are going to have the TV calibrated, the RGB backlighting seems to be more "calibratable" than the white LED TVs. And if you are interested in calibration, you'd be better off with a TV that has good calibration controls that work. The best calibration controls available right now are on Samsung's better models where you will find 10-point grayscale/gamma controls that most TVs do not have. You won't find good calibration controls on Sharp TVs and Toshiba controls don't work very well. Panasonic and Sony have limited calibration controls. AVS is great for researching this sort of information BEFORE you spend money on a TV.
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

To be VERY blunt... edge lit LED backlight systems suck. I personally would never own one unless it was a smaller size screen... like maybe less than 40" diagonal. And then, it would only be for casual use in a bedroom or study or sitting room, not for any critical viewing.

If you purchased the set from a retailer with a return policy and you find yourself not happy with the image, it would certainly be your right to return the TV if you were willing to pay more for a TV with an LED array behind the screen which will have much more uniform illumination. There are two kinds of 'behind-the-screen' LED arrays... white LEDs or 3-color, red, green, blue LEDs. If you are going to have the TV calibrated, the RGB backlighting seems to be more "calibratable" than the white LED TVs. And if you are interested in calibration, you'd be better off with a TV that has good calibration controls that work. The best calibration controls available right now are on Samsung's better models where you will find 10-point grayscale/gamma controls that most TVs do not have. You won't find good calibration controls on Sharp TVs and Toshiba controls don't work very well. Panasonic and Sony have limited calibration controls. AVS is great for researching this sort of information BEFORE you spend money on a TV.

Just to clarify this statement within the context of this conversation I understand that your opinion is that I have an inferior model, but not a defective model correct?

Thanks!-Brad
post #17 of 18
Every edge-lit LCD display I've seen has significant problems with uneven illumination. I'd call it a fairly bad problem. The store and manufacturer may shrug their shoulders... "they are all like that" probably applies unless your particular TV is really bad. It is very difficult in cases like this to draw a line between broken and normal. But... many retailers want you to be happy with your purchase and will allow an exchange for another similar size/cost TV (even a different brand) or for a more expensive model of the same or different brand. They want you to be happy with your purchase and will do exchanges like that even if the TV is not broken. There is usually a time limit though... often 30 days. In many cases they will even take the TV back entirely even if you don't get a different TV as long as you have all the original packaging and the TV looks like new.
post #18 of 18
^what he said is right. Now that you have the knowledge, look for a better TV within the same price range, using AVS forums. Find one you like and exchange the one you have now. It obviously bothers you, whether its defective or just normal. You don't want to be left with a problem that you get to see as you use your TV. It ruins the experience.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Display Calibration
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › Sharp Led one side a bit duller than the other, please help!