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What's the best power upgrade?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Greetings & Happy New Year!

Our combo music/HT system is:

1 - NAD T-747 AVR
2 - Polk Lsi7 Fronts 4 ohm (actual closer to 6 ohm)
1 - Polk LsiC Center 4 ohm
2 - Small RCA 8 ohm Rear speakers
1 - Panasonic Blu-Ray
1 - NEC CD Player
1 - 50" Plasma

We have been using this system for a few years and have enjoyed it well in our 12' x 24' listening room ( we listen across the short dimension ). All types of music and movies.

When in hard use as in Jr.'s WiiU for example, the NAD gets plenty warm and I'm thinking of how to best lessen the load on the AVR as economically as possible. My thoughts are that maybe the addition of a mono-block amp to the more difficult to drive LsiC center might do the trick.

Any thoughts, suggestions, advice appreciated. We have absolutely no practical experience with power amplifier separates.

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 25
Emotiva UPA-500 (currently $349, shipped; reg. $399).

Use it to run your front three speakers, or all five.
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your prompt reply, eljaycanuck. How would the UPA-500 improve on the power my NAD is providing already? It is my understanding that the NAD T-747 gets roughly 5x117=570 into 5 channels vs. 5x80=400 with the UPA-500. Basically I think I need the most help with the front 3 speakers. Help me out if I'm missing something.

Thanks again.
post #4 of 25
Quote:
How would the UPA-500 improve on the power my NAD is providing already?
How would adding a single monoblock amp for the CC speaker do that? Anyway, in your post you said "When in hard use ... the NAD gets plenty warm and I'm thinking of how to best lessen the load on the AVR as economically as possible." The UPA-500 will do exactly that.
Quote:
It is my understanding that the NAD T-747 gets roughly 5x117=570 into 5 channels vs. 5x80=400 with the UPA-500.
According to their respective product pages:
- the T-747 puts out "7 X 60 watts Simultaneous Full Disclosure Power"*;
- the UPA-500 puts out "120 watts / channel (4 ohms; all channels driven); 80 watts / channel (8 ohms; all channels driven)"; and
- your Polks are 4-ohm, 88dB sensitivity speakers.

(*The owner's manual says "Power output Surround Mode 7 x 60 W" but, as with the product page, there's no mention of whether that's into 4 or 8 ohms.)

The UPA-500 will easily power your front three speakers, letting your NAD comfortably handle the surrounds as well as A/V processing.
Edited by eljaycanuck - 1/3/14 at 9:43pm
post #5 of 25
No mention of a subwoofer. Do you have one? If not adding one will help if the internal setting on the NAD are done properly. With a sub setting all speakers to small will allow the subwoofer to play all of the low frequencies below 80hz - or from wherever you set the crossover. The lower the frequency the more power it takes to reproduce the sound.

You could either add an Emotiva XPA-3 to drive the front three or the UPA-500 and drive all 5 speakers - I doubt you'll hear any difference with either one other than a cooler running AVR - or get a good sub if you don't already have one.

Or get an AVR cooling fan setup. I use a pair of these on my HK990. Temps went from ~120*F down to 85*F. Quite a drop IMO. That fan comes with a couple of resistor add-on cables so you can pick how fast you want the fan to turn. I have it on the most quiet ones and I cannot hear them. I connect them to a smart strip with an AC to DC adapter plugged into the smart strip. I have no idea how much more life I'll get out of the HK990 but it has to help.

I agree with eljay about the mono-block for the center speaker.
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your replies.

To eljaycanuck:

"How would the UPA-500 improve on the power my NAD is providing already?"

I honestly don't know, that's why I asked. The NAD gets "plenty warm" in the WiiU mode, not so in stereo or HT use. Someone suggested that since the center in the hardest of the three fronts to drive that I might try a mono-block as that's what the someone said he did before he finally popped for a 5 channel amp, so I thought I'd ask here.

"It is my understanding that the NAD T-747 gets roughly 5x117=570 into 5 channels vs. 5x80=400 with the UPA-500."

A fellow NAD user told me that my receiver uses a shared power supply & amp stages which is why you get more power using 5 channels than 7 and quoted the number as roughly 5x114 into 5 channels. Was he right? I don't have the foggiest but he sounded like he knew what he was talking about. If you say that's wrong I can't argue with you, but using his numbers I'm probably doing as well if not better on power with my AVR than with the UPA-500, no? I'm not arguing, just passing on what I've been told and am going by until I know better. As a matter of fact Emotiva's current holiday sale is one of the reasons I'm asking these questions, thanks.

Right, the Polks are 4-ohm 88 db sensitive but I'm told these Lsi7 bookshelf series runs closer to 6 ohms and are the easiest to drive of the Lsi series which includes the Lsi9 bookshelves which are supposed to be much more power hungry. It is my understanding that the LsiC is closer to the Lsi9 in being harder to drive, thus my curiosity about a mono-block as a less expensive solution. The research I did prior to buying the NAD told me they could handle these 4 ohm speakers just fine, and they have.

To Knucklehead90,

Sorry, I failed to mention that we have a Mirage Omni S8 powered sub connected to the system which we are very happy with. The AVR cooling fan I hadn't thought of since our AVR is in an open (front and rear anyway) stand, although there isn't much more than an inch to spare above it. Thanks for that insight - will check it out.
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by batuche View Post

The AVR cooling fan I hadn't thought of since our AVR is in an open (front and rear anyway) stand, although there isn't much more than an inch to spare above it. Thanks for that insight - will check it out.

I think you just identified your problem.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by batuche View Post

Greetings & Happy New Year!

Our combo music/HT system is:

1 - NAD T-747 AVR
2 - Polk Lsi7 Fronts 4 ohm (actual closer to 6 ohm)
1 - Polk LsiC Center 4 ohm
2 - Small RCA 8 ohm Rear speakers
1 - Panasonic Blu-Ray
1 - NEC CD Player
1 - 50" Plasma

We have been using this system for a few years and have enjoyed it well in our 12' x 24' listening room ( we listen across the short dimension ). All types of music and movies.

When in hard use as in Jr.'s WiiU for example, the NAD gets plenty warm and I'm thinking of how to best lessen the load on the AVR as economically as possible. My thoughts are that maybe the addition of a mono-block amp to the more difficult to drive LsiC center might do the trick.

Any thoughts, suggestions, advice appreciated. We have absolutely no practical experience with power amplifier separates.

If memory serves the NAD has a cooling fan that is mounted so that the air blows vertically. Keeping inches of free space above and below it can make a big difference. I think there is one other such suggestion in the thread and I wanted to expand on it - it is a good idea.

The second way to take a significant heat load off of the AVR and make major gains in sound quality is to add a good sub. Given your investment I'm thinking of subs in the $500-1,000 range by SVS, Rhythmic, and Hsu. But even a $300 subwoofer can be a big help to any floorstanders and even more so to bookshelf speakers.

Your last chance is external power amp, which is much more expensive than the cooling upgrade and has similar costs to the subwoofer, but won't improve sound quality as much.
post #9 of 25

I’d go with the subwoofer plan. Not only will a good sub take the strain off the amp, as Arny says, but it will also take much strain off the main speakers by relieving them of the difficult 'heavy lifting' when they attempt to dig deep and loud at the same time.  This will bring benefits for the higher frequencies as well as the lower frequencies, allowing the main speakers to deliver their best possible performance, relieved of the difficult task of playing very low frequencies. A good sub has been purpose-designed to do one thing and do it well. And it will have a powerful amplifier matched to its driver(s). The OP already has a sub but it is an 8 inch unit and I am thinking of something much bigger and better - something more like this

 

Additionally, a subwoofer can be placed in the room at the optimum position for good bass, working with the room instead of against it  - something that cannot be achieved with the main speakers which have to be positioned up front for obvious reasons.  This also brings the possibility that the subwoofer can be 'hidden' away in the room, thus satisfying WAF and aesthetics at the same time.

post #10 of 25
Quote:
To eljaycanuck:
OP, I don't know what to say. You were inquiring about a cost-effective way to take the load off your AVR, and you were thinking about using a mono-block amp. I suggested a UPA-500.

If you're not happy with the idea of using a UPA-500 to power either your front three speakers or your CC + surrounds - leaving the NAD to comfortably handle the remaining speakers + A/V processing - buy a mono-block amp like "someone" suggested you do and be happy with it.

Best of luck. smile.gif
Edited by eljaycanuck - 1/5/14 at 6:36am
post #11 of 25

If he's only worrying about the current AVR getting too hot, then the cooling solution suggested is a cheap fix, in addition to or instead of giving the unit some space above and around it.  An external amp will take the load off the AVR but it probably won't make any contribution to improved sound quality (unless he is already clipping when pushing the NAD hard). OTOH, a sub upgrade will take the strain off the amp AND give an improvement in SQ.

 

If the only problem is the heat, cheapest and best solution is to give the unit some space and if that doesn't work, use the cooling fans.

 

I think he has plenty of food for thought now. Or confusion ;)

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all. Eh, I'm normally at least a little confused when it comes to technical talk on audio so no problemo.

Egg on face! In my haste to post I failed to mention that we do have a powered sub attached to the AVR. It has proven a wonderful addition to the Lsi7 bookshelves.

Knucklehead and Kbarnes, more space above the AVR might be best/cost effective solution of all. Very much thanks. We'll address the heat issue by first relocating the AVR with ample space above.

Mr. eljay, the Emotiva UPA-500 solution is very attractive to us and affordable, esp. during the holiday sale. We may take a shot at it after we experiment with cooling the AVR. If we miss this year's sale, there's always next. Since I don't have a clue how the UPA-500 would effect sound and Messrs. arnyk and kbarnes701 suggest that it might be negligible, we'll try to solve the heat issue first. Other than "someone" telling me, I don't have a clue how power is distributed in an AVR running fewer than 7 x 60 W power output in the surround mode as listed in the specs. The specs also say 2 x 110W (ref. 0.08 % THD, 8 ohms) and 2 x 160W (IHF dynamic power - 8 ohms) and 2 x 220W @ 4 ohms). I'm not shy to admit that I don't have a clue how that breaks down when using only 5 of the 7 available channels. Without in-depth knowledge of audio/electronics we're fairly dependent on what we can glean by reading and occasionally asking stupid questions. Sometimes we're given rock solid advice, sometimes not. Prior to our leap into HT the world was a lot simpler.

The replies we received here have provided plenty of food for thought with a little less confusion (thanks kbarnes701) and a real and affordable pathway to solving the problem of an overly warm AVR.

Thank you all for your replies.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by batuche View Post

Thanks to all. Eh, I'm normally at least a little confused when it comes to technical talk on audio so no problemo.

Egg on face! In my haste to post I failed to mention that we do have a powered sub attached to the AVR. It has proven a wonderful addition to the Lsi7 bookshelves.

Knucklehead and Kbarnes, more space above the AVR might be best/cost effective solution of all. Very much thanks. We'll address the heat issue by first relocating the AVR with ample space above.

Mr. eljay, the Emotiva UPA-500 solution is very attractive to us and affordable, esp. during the holiday sale. We may take a shot at it after we experiment with cooling the AVR. If we miss this year's sale, there's always next. Since I don't have a clue how the UPA-500 would effect sound and Messrs. arnyk and kbarnes701 suggest that it might be negligible, we'll try to solve the heat issue first. Other than "someone" telling me, I don't have a clue how power is distributed in an AVR running fewer than 7 x 60 W power output in the surround mode as listed in the specs. The specs also say 2 x 110W (ref. 0.08 % THD, 8 ohms) and 2 x 160W (IHF dynamic power - 8 ohms) and 2 x 220W @ 4 ohms). I'm not shy to admit that I don't have a clue how that breaks down when using only 5 of the 7 available channels. Without in-depth knowledge of audio/electronics we're fairly dependent on what we can glean by reading and occasionally asking stupid questions. Sometimes we're given rock solid advice, sometimes not. Prior to our leap into HT the world was a lot simpler.

The replies we received here have provided plenty of food for thought with a little less confusion (thanks kbarnes701) and a real and affordable pathway to solving the problem of an overly warm AVR.

Thank you all for your replies.

 

You are welcome!  I’d try the obvious first - give the unit more space around it. If that fixes it, job done and at no cost probably. If it almost fixes it, I'd consider the fans (I use those Noctua fans on my Onkyo processor - Onks notoriously run hot and every degree above 80F is bad news IMO).

 

Please report back your findings!

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Kbarnes702

Reporting back with our findings.

After repositioning the AVR it remains quite warm if not hot on top - please note this high heat situation exists ONLY when junior is playing his WiiU, which is connected to an HDMI port on the AVR and seems to demand more resources from the AVR. We then tried placing a small desk type fan beside the unit and VOILA! Heat dissipation no longer seems to be a problem.

Understanding this means dissipation and does not "cure" the demand/draw on the AVR which causes the heat in the first place, thus while we can and will do something to alleviate the heat build-up while using the WiiU, I think the ultimate cure may be a separate power amp, 3-5 channel. That being said, it's a matter of finding one that fits our budget and meets our power needs. Maybe back to the Emotiva UPA-500 or the like as the "Final Solution," eljay.
post #15 of 25
Everybody here gets an F!!!!!!!

Starting with the OP, you didn't mention until post #6 that you had a sub woofer. Also it was buried at the end of that long post. You mentioned the LSiC as being a difficult load for your NAD. Medium efficiency speakers like those Polks should be handled easily by your receiver. The HDMI board needs lots of space above to let that heat escape.

For all the pros responding after post #6 you're guilty of not reading it to the bottom. But then I'm not so sure adding a sub would have made that much temperature difference. It just seemed like those Polks and RCAs should have been handled easily by the NAD.

i think the NAD has the same problem as some of the Onkyos up until recently. In fact my Integra prepro ran very hot until I made different arrangements. It was becoming a bad actor until I retired it to another room. With better ventilation it's acting normal again. When I point the red beam right at the HDMI board I get the highest temperature readings.

So for the OP do whatever it takes to remove heat from the HDMI board. Or consider a newer inexpensive AVR. They've made big jumps feature wise. Newer forms of Audyssey will impress you.
post #16 of 25
Might also try, if the avr is being used as a video processor to switch it to through (if possible) and rather let the display do that.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by batuche View Post

Kbarnes702

Reporting back with our findings.

After repositioning the AVR it remains quite warm if not hot on top - please note this high heat situation exists ONLY when junior is playing his WiiU, which is connected to an HDMI port on the AVR and seems to demand more resources from the AVR. We then tried placing a small desk type fan beside the unit and VOILA! Heat dissipation no longer seems to be a problem.

Understanding this means dissipation and does not "cure" the demand/draw on the AVR which causes the heat in the first place, thus while we can and will do something to alleviate the heat build-up while using the WiiU, I think the ultimate cure may be a separate power amp, 3-5 channel. That being said, it's a matter of finding one that fits our budget and meets our power needs. Maybe back to the Emotiva UPA-500 or the like as the "Final Solution," eljay.

I took another look at the thread and see that your system has a sub - of sorts.

Mirage Omni S8
Woofer 8" woofer with ribbed elliptical surround

Here is some relevant technical information that can guide one while choosing subwoofers::

The following lists the maximum undistorted SPL for a SOTA 8" driver (19 mm Xmax). Just to reveiw Xmax is shorthand for linear travel. Cone area and linear travel set the high water mark for low bass extension and dynamic range. The only way to beat this kind of limitation involves outsized enclosures with complex internals such as is sold by Danley. http://www.danleysoundlabs.com/products/subwoofers/tapped-horns/th-spud/ would be an example. It is 11 x 48 x 45 or about 16 cubic feet, about as much volume as a home freezer. It is solid technology but has shall we say limited WAF. ;-)

Hz SPL
20 90
30 97
40 102
50 106
60 109
70 112
80 114
90 117
100 118
130 123

One key factoid is that the indicated maximum undistorted output of the ideal SOTA 8" subwoofer is only 90 dB. I say "only 90 dB SPL" because the threshold of hearing at 20 Hz is 85 dB. 5 dB above threshold mostly translates into imperceptible. So not only is this sub profoundly limited at in the lowest octave, it is basically a non-starter.


Another key point is that the 18 mm Xmax driver I modelled is probably science fiction - the largest Xmax I can find for a real world 8" woofer is more like 12 mm. The odds that even such a far less capable subwoofer driver would show up in a ca. $200 powered subwoofer is slim and none.

Seems marginal for one device. 2-4 such subwoofers could be interesting.

In general subwoofer manufacturers seem to decline to provide actual data for driver Xmax. The above is a charitable view of what a very good commercial sub with an SOTA 8" drive can possibly do.

Just to review, the following is similar information for a SOTA 12" driver:

Hz SPL
20 99
30 107
40 112
50 115
60 119
70 121
80 124
90 126
100 127
130 132

Seems potentially useful but not spectacular. A pair could be interesting.

Just to review, the following is similar information for a SOTA 18" driver:

Hz SPL
20 110
30 118
40 123
50 126
60 130
70 132
80 135
90 137
100 138
130 143

A single 18 or a pair of 12s is the beginning of a system with interesting amounts of bass over the full audible range, but still short of what hard core HT enthusiasts seem to find impressive. The point here is that EFX can go far lower than music, and this is what is probably happening with your Wii users. Games are all about EFX.

It is not uncommon for people to run their entire system several dB louder to compensate for a marginal subwoofer.
Edited by arnyk - 1/6/14 at 4:23am
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by batuche View Post

Kbarnes702

Reporting back with our findings.

After repositioning the AVR it remains quite warm if not hot on top - please note this high heat situation exists ONLY when junior is playing his WiiU, which is connected to an HDMI port on the AVR and seems to demand more resources from the AVR. We then tried placing a small desk type fan beside the unit and VOILA! Heat dissipation no longer seems to be a problem.

Understanding this means dissipation and does not "cure" the demand/draw on the AVR which causes the heat in the first place, thus while we can and will do something to alleviate the heat build-up while using the WiiU, I think the ultimate cure may be a separate power amp, 3-5 channel. That being said, it's a matter of finding one that fits our budget and meets our power needs. Maybe back to the Emotiva UPA-500 or the like as the "Final Solution," eljay.

If you reduce operating temperatures you are in fact addressing on the order of 90% of the reliability impact of full-powered usage. Furthermore, you never actually provided a temperature, which is best obtained by placing an ordinary dial thermometer in the air flow

http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-5989N-Classic-Instant-Thermometer/dp/B00004XSC4



or measuring equipment enclosure temperature with a non-contact thermometer,

http://www.amazon.com/BAFX-Products-Infrared-Thermometer-Includes/dp/B006V4WNYU/



Temperatures as low as 105 degrees which is safe for even the most complex electronic equipment can feel hot to many. 112-120 degrees is about all that most people can stand to touch for any amount of time. While not optimum temperatures like this are not usually a serious problem.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Collins View Post

Everybody here gets an F!!!!!!!

Starting with the OP, you didn't mention until post #6 that you had a sub woofer. Also it was buried at the end of that long post. You mentioned the LSiC as being a difficult load for your NAD. Medium efficiency speakers like those Polks should be handled easily by your receiver. The HDMI board needs lots of space above to let that heat escape.
 

 

Thanks for marking our work.

 

The point is he has a subwoofer of sorts. Personally, I wouldn't really call it a good subwoofer. In my post recommending a subwoofer I was careful to point out that I meant a good subwoofer, and even gave a link to an example. 

 

I said: "The OP already has a sub but it is an 8 inch unit and I am thinking of something much bigger and better - something more like this."

 

Do I get my grade revised for having read the OP's post all the way through? 

post #20 of 25
Oops, just as guilty for reading too fast. Caught your reference to his sub. Now I'm down to a D.

But I still maintain that his real heat problem is the HDMI board and changing subs is a marginal improvement.

Before I removed my Integra DTC 9.8 prepro from my HT I made comparisons with the new Onkyo TX-NR929. The 9.8 heat problems were so bad that in it's last week there I had a big fan on it. In my comparisons the 929 was running between 30 and 35 degrees cooler even with it's 9 amps all being used.

With the Integra in an audio only room now it's running much cooler and showing no symptoms as before when also doing video chores.

We're all aware of the benefits of adding a powered sub to a receiver but it's heat reducing factor is small.

Now that Onkyo has figured out how to make a cooler running HDMI board I wonder how HDMI 2.0 is going to factor into it.

BTW when using an NC Thermometer like Arny showed I could zero in on the HDMI board and that's when the temps jumped.

Keith I'll consider revising your grade in exchange for some Audyssey tips and tweaks.
Edited by Patrick Collins - 1/6/14 at 9:48am
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Gentlemen,

My bad for not mentioning our sorta-sub at the time of posing, most probably because I didn’t believe it factored into the heat equation. I apologize to all, and I hate getting F's!

Yes, we pulled the trigger on the Lsi7 4-ohm speakers only after NAD sorta/kinda replied that the T-747 could drive them, and the folks at Polk said no sweat – go for it and don’t look back. It has been a sweet combination until the addition of our WiiU. Obviously we are not hard core HT enthusiasts nor hard core gamers. We only acquired the WiiU this Christmas with junior running it a lot over break, thus my observations about heat.

More on the sorta-sub. We were pretty much on our own, meaning we didn’t have much advice when we moved from 2-channel stereo to HT, and while it ended up costing more than we thought, no surprise to anyone but us, nearly everything in our modest system was purchased at close-out prices – about half of retail, with the exception of our sorta-sub, which was also on sale but not at 50%. When shopping and trying to learn about 5.1 and HT we perused quite a few posts that strongly suggested the addition of a sub to supplement bookshelves, thus our decision to add a sub (hey, it got great reviews!). We had and continue to have other economic priorities greater than audio and with $1600.00 for a sub, for example, we could replicate our AVR and Polk Lsi fronts.

Perhaps ignorance is bliss. We have been happy with the addition of the sub; for music we can actually hear the bass player now and for HT it provides all the boom we want during those Bruce Willis action flicks. We don’t notice that we listen any louder to achieve the extra bass, i.e., same volume settings for news out of the center although we do reach a certain age when everything needs to be a few decibels louder anyway. Two subs? Hadn’t thought of that - maybe we’ll look at that as a future upgrade, or if that’s just throwing good money after bad, maybe a new and larger sub.

After experimenting last night (junior’s last night on the WiiU – back to school today) with a small desk fan blowing on the AVR, I think we settled on the most economical solution. For now, we’re going with Knucklehead90’s fan, post #5 & post #7. We’re getting a new, wider TV/HT stand that is open in front but partially closed in back – I’ll cut a hole to mount the fan, run it through an adapter and plug it into the switched outlet on the back of the AVR. Thanks again Knucklehead90.

No, we haven’t run a proper temp test even though we have thermometers to do so and probably won’t until junior gets another break from school. My concern was raised by simply running my hand over the rear-back of the AVR during heavy WiiU usage and being very surprised by the high degree of heat which I have never felt in a HT application.

Thanks you all.
post #22 of 25
I hope everyone takes their "F" with tongue in cheek.

Upon further review, considering those Polk LSi7 speakers, for the price they make excellent bookshelf speakers to build a system around, up to a point. But up until that point $$$$, they will be better served with a better sub. I have the predecessor (RT25i?) to that model in another room. Again, for the money I always thought they sounded great. But in this house I added one of my home built subs and now they sing.

As for the NAD, when new, another good bang for the buck. But time has moved on and it's lacking some current amenities like ethernet, USB and more advanced room correction. This is how I justify updating.....it's going to power up another room.

But in order of importance:

1. Heat reduction. Fans meant to go over PCs might not be sufficient. My Integra runs way hotter than my HTPC. But the right fan will be necessary.

2. Best bang for the buck subwoofer in your price range.

3. Quality mid range receiver. As much as I like Onkyo products avoid the ones known to have HDMI board issues or you'll be right back where you are now.

4. Replace the RCA surrounds.

If and when you make a really big upgrade, keep those Polks for another room.
post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 
No “F” problem at this end. Everyone should get at least a silver star for responding.

Yes, we liked the NAD since we first learned about it and consider it sheer dumb luck on our part to have caught and bought it on close-out.

Same with the Lsi7’s, and also because they were some of the few speakers we could audition locally, albeit at Fry’s. I lusted even more after the Lsi 9’s but at the time I didn’t believe that we could drive them adequately with the NAD. I doubt we’ll ever part with them – very attractive in cherry too.

Our sorta-sub was self-researched on the internet and, as stated previously, received good to great reviews by everyone who reviewed it, honest. Check it out: http://hometheaterreview.com/mirage-omni-s8-powered-subwoofer-reviewed/. At the time we did think it was our best bang for the buck and we still rather appreciate having it. (PM me if anyone is interested - grinz).

The RCA surrounds were almost an afterthought as they were leftover fronts from a homemade mount on an old but magnificent Mitsubishi tube TV. They’re now perched on metal stands beside our listening couch and . . . well, they add . . . something . . . to make a 5.1 system. I may have a better solution in a pair of Polk Rti4’s currently connected to my computer via an old receiver. But then . . .

Time certainly moves faster in technology than many other realms of life and while some folks live closer to the cutting edge, us not so much. To make short of it, we’ll probably piss around tweaking this setup in roughly Mr. Collin’s order until the AVR dies. Yes, those Emotiva 3-5 channels look better and better every time we look at them, but are they necessary? We’ll see.

The WiiU was the latest addition and along with it arrived the high heat issue. Until our new furniture arrives we’ll leave the small desk fan on the floor next to the NAD and run it on low when playing the WiiU. It seems to be doing the job.

Appreciate all the help and good advice. You never know unless you ask. My haste to post resulted in a careless equipment listing which was not intended to cause a ripple in the ionosphere. All is well, carry on and thanks again.
post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 
When I first posted we were waiting on a new TV stand which would also hold our system. Based on Knucklehead90s’s post I had planned on cutting a hole in the rear panel and mount one or more HK990 fans. Now that it has arrived we decided against doing that but instead purchased one of these http://www.staples.com/Holmes-Mini-High-Velocity-Personal-Fan/product_949549 which is small enough to fit between the shelves the NAD AVR now sits in and behind the AVR itself, blowing plenty of cool air right over the top of HDMI board vents. Plugged it in to the switched outlet on the back of the AVR and it works like a charm. Yes, it’s a perfectly cheap solution to the additional demands the WiiU must be making on the HDMI board plus now we have a little extra in the kitty for that future subwoofer upgrade.

While Knucklehead90 pretty much identified the problem right off the bat, great information and advice was gleaned from everyone who responded. As rank novices in audio we really didn't know where to start with the heating problem and now we have not only solved it but have a decent road map for whatever future upgrades we choose to make.

We’re now enjoying our modest little system like never before.

Thanks again to all for your help.
post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
P.S. We disconnected the RCA rears until we settle on a decent replacement.
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