or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Can't Figure Out How to Change Ohms Setting in Pioneer 522-k
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Can't Figure Out How to Change Ohms Setting in Pioneer 522-k

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I read the manual and I can't find the information how to change from 8 ohms setting to 6 ohms for my speaker. What's the instruction to change the speaker 8 ohms on this receiver? Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 26
There is no such thing. Just connect the speakers and play away.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FMW View Post

There is no such thing. Just connect the speakers and play away.

For my Yamaha, there is an option for you select 8 or 6 ohms settings. I wonder how does Pioneer knows what ohm speaker it use? Ohm matching is important.
post #4 of 26
MCACC DSP will figure all of that out.biggrin.gif
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by derrickdj1 View Post

MCACC DSP will figure all of that out.biggrin.gif

Thanks. Really... That's a very smart DSP. I wonder why no other brand receiver does that to make life lot easier for us setup speakers.
post #6 of 26
Some Other receivers have a setting between 4,6,8 ohm to lower the amplifiers power output to protect against over heating,
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscorv58 View Post

Some Other receivers have a setting between 4,6,8 ohm to lower the amplifiers power output to protect against over heating,

Agree. 4, 6, 8 ohms are the common settings. The more that I think about it, I wonder how reliable is the DSP in detecting the speaker's ohm.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by magi44ken View Post

For my Yamaha, there is an option for you select 8 or 6 ohms settings. I wonder how does Pioneer knows what ohm speaker it use? Ohm matching is important.

The only difference between a 8 ohm and 6 ohm setting is the 6 ohm setting delivers less power. You can also achieve a similar effect but putting locking the maximum db value and setting it low.
post #9 of 26
How many of the new Pioneer have overheating issues? Most people say they run cool compared to other avr. Also when the ohm load is reduce, so is the damping of the amp.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by magi44ken View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by FMW View Post

There is no such thing. Just connect the speakers and play away.

For my Yamaha, there is an option for you select 8 or 6 ohms settings. I wonder how does Pioneer knows what ohm speaker it use? Ohm matching is important.

Ohms matching is relatively unimportant for a well-designed Class AB or G/H amplifier. It can be important for some Class D (switchmode) amps. The Pioneer 522-k seems to have standard class AB power amps.

Most ohms switches on AVRs selected different taps on the power transformer to optimize the AVR to squeeze out the last watt possible without overheating during bench testing.

If you listen to music over speakers this feature should be irrelevant even when it exists. An AVR dissipates less than 1/2 to 1/4 as much heat while playing music as it does while playing pure sine waves on the test bench. Using speakers rather than resistive loads cuts out another 25-33% of the heat. The fact that almost nobody plays their system at full tilt boogie all the time makes further significant cuts.

If an AVR overheats in typical use, it means that it is in a poorly ventilated space, that there are problems with the speaker wiring or in rare circumstances either the speakers or the AVR itself is damaged.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by magi44ken View Post

The more that I think about it, I wonder how reliable is the DSP in detecting the speaker's ohm.

He wasn't serious. smile.gif
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyd View Post

He wasn't serious. smile.gif

Ok... so who should I believe.

arnyk: Thanks for the detail explanation.

I do find it very interest that this particular model 522k does not have an option to change between 6 and 8 ohms. In the specification, it does mention it supports 6 and 8 ohms. In other models that I check, there is an option to set it by pressing Enter key and then press Power key.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by magi44ken View Post

Ok... so who should I believe.

arnyk: Thanks for the detail explanation.

I do find it very interest that this particular model 522k does not have an option to change between 6 and 8 ohms. In the specification, it does mention it supports 6 and 8 ohms. In other models that I check, there is an option to set it by pressing Enter key and then press Power key.

I've never had any kind of amp with a setting like that, so i wouldn't worry about it. Just play it and don't worry about it as other have said. smile.gif
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by magi44ken View Post

Ok... so who should I believe.

arnyk: Thanks for the detail explanation.

I do find it very interest that this particular model 522k does not have an option to change between 6 and 8 ohms. In the specification, it does mention it supports 6 and 8 ohms. In other models that I check, there is an option to set it by pressing Enter key and then press Power key.
The ohm speaker setting is not for matching the speaker. Leave it at 8 ohm unless the receiver keeps shutting down. Then and only then lower the ohm setting.
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkenit2 View Post

The ohm speaker setting is not for matching the speaker. Leave it at 8 ohm unless the receiver keeps shutting down. Then and only then lower the ohm setting.

If I was using 6 ohm speakers, and the equipment provided a switch to set it at 8 or 6 ohms, I would set it to 6 ohms, especially if the owners manual suggests the user to do so. If the ohm setting is not for impedence matching, then what is it for?
post #16 of 26
I've owned probably 10 AVR's over the years and none of them have had a 6/8 ohm setting. Those include Denon, Harman Kardon, Marantz, Onkyo, Yamaha and Sherwood Newcastle.

I don't see the point of it.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Espo77 View Post

If I was using 6 ohm speakers, and the equipment provided a switch to set it at 8 or 6 ohms, I would set it to 6 ohms, especially if the owners manual suggests the user to do so. If the ohm setting is not for impedence matching, then what is it for?
The ohm switch in receivers is a cover my ass power limiter. No matter what ohm speaker you connect when the amp is set lower it won't play the speaker as loud and will put less strain (heat) on the amplifier. The only way to know is try it. I forgot to mention. If a receiver keeps going into protection mode unplug the power and check the speaker wire connections at both ends and make sure no little strands of copper are hanging out or touching other metal. That can allow speakers to play somewhat, but still shut down. Lowering the amp ohm may go louder, but not near as loud as 8 ohm should. Happened to me once.

My bold statement is based on owning and using several brands of receivers. I also own several stand alone home theater class a/b and class d amplifiers. I own a few professional class h stereo amps. I own and use 40 bookshelf and center speakers. Most are rated 4 ohm. Is that minimum or nominal? Who cares? Speakers vary their ohms over the full range of sound. Under similar conditions a lower ohm speaker is harder on an amp than a bigger number. I also own all kinds of home and car subwoofers. And I crank it loud. Almost none of my amps even have an ohm switch. Just the gain knob. There may be crappy (Pyle) or super expensive boutique brands where this setting is critical. What equipment are you quoting from?
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkenit2 View Post

The ohm switch in receivers is a cover my ass power limiter. No matter what ohm speaker you connect when the amp is set lower it won't play the speaker as loud and will put less strain (heat) on the amplifier. The only way to know is try it. I forgot to mention. If a receiver keeps going into protection mode unplug the power and check the speaker wire connections at both ends and make sure no little strands of copper are hanging out or touching other metal. That can allow speakers to play somewhat, but still shut down. Lowering the amp ohm may go louder, but not near as loud as 8 ohm should. Happened to me once.

My bold statement is based on owning and using several brands of receivers. I also own several stand alone home theater class a/b and class d amplifiers. I own a few professional class h stereo amps. I own and use 40 bookshelf and center speakers. Most are rated 4 ohm. Is that minimum or nominal? Who cares? Speakers vary their ohms over the full range of sound. Under similar conditions a lower ohm speaker is harder on an amp than a bigger number. I also own all kinds of home and car subwoofers. And I crank it loud. Almost none of my amps even have an ohm switch. Just the gain knob. There may be crappy (Pyle) or super expensive boutique brands where this setting is critical. What equipment are you quoting from?

My new Yamaha RX-A3030 has a switch for 6 ohm or 8 ohm configuration. My older Adcom THX 5 channel amp (not using right now) has 4 ohm capability, and doesn't have a switch for adjusting this...I've always assumed that it simply makes the adjustment to a lower impedence when needed. Why do you think Yamaha puts this option on the receiver?
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Espo77 View Post

My new Yamaha RX-A3030 has a switch for 6 ohm or 8 ohm configuration. My older Adcom THX 5 channel amp (not using right now) has 4 ohm capability, and doesn't have a switch for adjusting this...I've always assumed that it simply makes the adjustment to a lower impedence when needed. Why do you think Yamaha puts this option on the receiver?
I see that on page 135 of the manual. They make that setting pretty hard to find. The fact is almost all mainstream midlevel and up home theater receivers have this setting. Your 9 channel amp only has 1 power supply. And it is not massive. The more speakers you drive the less watts each speaker gets regardless of ohm's rating. Keep connecting huge 4 ohm towers to every channel and play it loud. Eventually the receiver will go into protection and shut down. I don't recommend doing that on purpose, but it shouldn't break the receiver. At that point after checking for shorted speaker wires you can switch the ohm setting to the smaller number and limit the amp output power or start adding standalone amps to take some load/strain off the receiver. I use mostly Yamaha lately, but their internal amps are not that strong. That's why I only buy receivers with full preamp out. I don't buy a receiver to not be able to play it loud at times. I have a lot of 4 ohm speakers with no bass driver. I can put almost any $1000 receiver into protection if I hook up more than 5 speakers and crank it up for a long time. That's why I keep a separate amp around. Piece of mind.

The only other feature I recommend people not try is bi-amping your speakers with the receiver amps. Again almost every midlevel and up receiver has this feature. It won't give your speakers any more power worth noting. That flagship 3030 should be able to drive a lot of speakers pretty darn loud (and stay ultra clean) without getting very hot. Monitor the receiver by touching the top. If it gets real hot then be concerned about limiting the power.
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
I wanted to thank you for everyone sharing your experience in this. I learn a lot from it. I need to do some experience myself.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkenit2 View Post

The fact is almost all mainstream midlevel and up home theater receivers have this setting. .

That is not correct. The fact is most AVR's DO NOT have this setting.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkenit2 View Post

I see that on page 135 of the manual. They make that setting pretty hard to find. The fact is almost all mainstream midlevel and up home theater receivers have this setting. Your 9 channel amp only has 1 power supply. And it is not massive. The more speakers you drive the less watts each speaker gets regardless of ohm's rating. Keep connecting huge 4 ohm towers to every channel and play it loud. Eventually the receiver will go into protection and shut down. I don't recommend doing that on purpose, but it shouldn't break the receiver. At that point after checking for shorted speaker wires you can switch the ohm setting to the smaller number and limit the amp output power or start adding standalone amps to take some load/strain off the receiver. I use mostly Yamaha lately, but their internal amps are not that strong. That's why I only buy receivers with full preamp out. I don't buy a receiver to not be able to play it loud at times. I have a lot of 4 ohm speakers with no bass driver. I can put almost any $1000 receiver into protection if I hook up more than 5 speakers and crank it up for a long time. That's why I keep a separate amp around. Piece of mind.

The only other feature I recommend people not try is bi-amping your speakers with the receiver amps. Again almost every midlevel and up receiver has this feature. It won't give your speakers any more power worth noting. That flagship 3030 should be able to drive a lot of speakers pretty darn loud (and stay ultra clean) without getting very hot. Monitor the receiver by touching the top. If it gets real hot then be concerned about limiting the power.

The setting is not really hard to find. It shows up on the GUI when you are going through the set up menu. I'm only doing 3.1 at the moment. So far the receiver is just warm to the touch after being on for hours.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Espo77 View Post

The setting is not really hard to find. It shows up on the GUI when you are going through the set up menu. I'm only doing 3.1 at the moment. So far the receiver is just warm to the touch after being on for hours.
I now see it called out on page 18 and 21. By hidden I meant you can only get to this setting by having the receiver off and hold down 2 magic buttons to get to that gui. I searched ohm instead of the symbol or imp. Are you saying that option is also in the main gui screens? Even the instructions say that is mainly to play 4 ohm speakers. 6 ohm are no sweat. So what setting do you have it on? Try the other setting and verify if volume stays the same. Try to prove me right or wrong. I do think this setting makes a difference. It will limit the maximum watts output. My Yamaha 733 (820) has it also. I leave it on 8 ohm and run 4 ohm speakers fine. The Onkyo 1007 had it.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkenit2 View Post

I now see it called out on page 18 and 21. By hidden I meant you can only get to this setting by having the receiver off and hold down 2 magic buttons to get to that gui. I searched ohm instead of the symbol or imp. Are you saying that option is also in the main gui screens? Even the instructions say that is mainly to play 4 ohm speakers. 6 ohm are no sweat. So what setting do you have it on? Try the other setting and verify if volume stays the same. Try to prove me right or wrong. I do think this setting makes a difference. It will limit the maximum watts output. My Yamaha 733 (820) has it also. I leave it on 8 ohm and run 4 ohm speakers fine. The Onkyo 1007 had it.

I'll have to check the set up menu again when I'm home. I have 8 ohm spkrs., so I made sure it was set to 8 ohms. I also set up my son in laws 2030 for 8 ohms.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyd View Post

That is not correct. The fact is most AVR's DO NOT have this setting.
Maybe I have been lucky. Never needed to use it. I went from the Onkyo 1007 to the Denon 4311 to Pioneer 1121 to Yamaha 773. They all have a speaker impedance switch. Interesting that the Denon 4520 has 3 settings4/6/8 while the Denon X4000 doesn't. This is getting overblown.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkenit2 View Post

This is getting overblown.

Agreed! smile.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Can't Figure Out How to Change Ohms Setting in Pioneer 522-k