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My ported UXL-18 in 9.9cf (x2) - Page 2

post #31 of 126
Thread Starter 
Still cold, but I took advantage of the sunshine to cut the baffles today. I made my own circle jig out of some scrap wood. Countersunk the router screws into the wood so I did not leave any scratches. Things went pretty smoothly except for my first attempt. As I got towards the end of the circle, the jig, which was no longer attached to anything, moved outwards, and I shaved a little too much off the baffle at that one spot. Someone even warned me about that possibility, and I did not pay enough attention...rolleyes.gif Of course it is on the outer baffle as well. I was even warned not to do that one first!!!! It is not bad at all. It sanded pretty smooth, but I may apply a little bondo or wood putty to get it back to perfectly round. Maybe start gluing tonight...

post #32 of 126
Thread Starter 
Dry fit the pieces. All looks good...smile.gif Only have 4 clamps, so this will take a few days since I have two enclosures.




post #33 of 126
Looking good Nick! You’re not messing around, coming along really nice.. great pics!
post #34 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by fr8doggr View Post

All looks good...smile.gif

WOW...it sure does!

I WANT ONE!!!!biggrin.gif
post #35 of 126
Very sweet nick.:beer:
post #36 of 126
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I read somewhere that everyone likes pictures....biggrin.gif
post #37 of 126


Separated at birth!!!!!
post #38 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebuckaman View Post



Separated at birth!!!!!

Haha. Now that's funny! biggrin.gif
post #39 of 126
Man if you don't have a marty your not one of the cool kids biggrin.gif
post #40 of 126
"Dry fit the pieces. All looks good..."

+1 looks pretty awesome.
post #41 of 126
Awesome fr8dogg! Congrats!
post #42 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by chalugadp View Post

Man if you don't have a marty your not one of the cool kids biggrin.gif

Looks like thebuckaman is making himself a








(wait for it)












ANDYSUB!







(Sorry for the off topic and general silliness, fr8doggr. Great looking build smile.gif )
post #43 of 126
Or billysub
da2yvyjy.jpg
post #44 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by antisuck View Post

Looks like thebuckaman is making himself a








(wait for it)












ANDYSUB!







(Sorry for the off topic and general silliness, fr8doggr. Great looking build smile.gif )

Quote:
Originally Posted by chalugadp View Post

Or billysub
da2yvyjy.jpg

Haha. You guys are funny! I'm calling it the Machtsub (powerful in German). Sorry for the OT. Im going back to viewing!
post #45 of 126
Great looking build!!
post #46 of 126
Thread Starter 
I have some questions for those experienced in using Duratex.

1. Can I use any short-nap or sponge roller to apply it, or should I buy the ones being sold as Duratex rollers?

2. I have read that Duratex needs a porous substrate for adhesion, and many people have stated that Duratex does not bond well to Loctite PL 3X. I'm not using PL 3x, but does anyone know if it will bond with Titebond wood glue? I ask this because I may have glue squeeze-out along the front slots. I will wipe it off with a damp sponge, but if there is a small bead along the joint, will the Duratex bong there? I'd hate to skimp on the glue, but I don't want the Duratex flaking off either.

3. Do you recommend multiple coats of Duratex?

Thanks.
post #47 of 126
1 : use any foam roller you want, add a small amount of water for a finer finish
2: Just sand down any extra glue with some 80 grit paper, a little bit won't cause any problems
3: You'll need 2 coats for sure, possibly 3. I generally just do 3 when using a roller and sand my second coat so the 3rd looks really smooth but you don't have to.
post #48 of 126
Thread Starter 
Cross-bracing question. I am planning on cross-bracing panel-to-panel like buckaman did in this picture:



I went and bought 1" poplar dowel rods, but they cost $65. I have a ton of scrap MDF left over from my build. I am considering ripping the scrap MDF down to the size of the poplar dowels and using them as bracing instead. Has anyone ever cross-braced with MDF ripped that narrow (about 1.5" x .75")? My concern is that it is not as strong as the poplar hardwood at that size. Seems like it has more flex than the dowels. Would that not be as strong over time? If the .75" MDF is ok for cross-bracing, what would you recommend for a minimum width?
post #49 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by fr8doggr View Post

Cross-bracing question. I am planning on cross-bracing panel-to-panel like buckaman did in this picture:



I went and bought 1" poplar dowel rods, but they cost $65. I have a ton of scrap MDF left over from my build. I am considering ripping the scrap MDF down to the size of the poplar dowels and using them as bracing instead. Has anyone ever cross-braced with MDF ripped that narrow (about 1.5" x .75")? My concern is that it is not as strong as the poplar hardwood at that size. Seems like it has more flex than the dowels. Would that not be as strong over time?

I'm not sure on the rip width of the mdf with regards to overall strength. Me thinks it would be a bit less rigid than the dowels, but still far better than most bracing strategies. I will let others with more experience chime in.
post #50 of 126
Thread Starter 
Less rigid... That was what I was trying to describe. Thanks Buck.
post #51 of 126
notnyt used scrap plywood...

Quote:
Originally Posted by notnyt View Post

progress...

bracing
PLyIlXPl.jpg
post #52 of 126
Using dowels as pictured above, I'd be concerned with the surface area where the dowels are mated with each other. There isn't that much room there for glue to hold. If one of those ever comes loose, you're in for some awful noise. If you used that same bracing scheme with MDF, you'd probably be fine as well. Gluing them where they intersect adds a great deal of strength as there is less unsupported length.

However, if you use strips of wood like pictured above, it would generally be a good idea to add some pieces, as pictured, to provide additional mating surface area on the walls. This also gives you something inside the box to nail to.

You can see hi-res here:

http://i.imgur.com/PLyIlXP.jpg
post #53 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by notnyt View Post

Using dowels as pictured above, I'd be concerned with the surface area where the dowels are mated with each other. There isn't that much room there for glue to hold. If one of those ever comes loose, you're in for some awful noise.

Then I'd use gorilla glue (or other foaming polyurethane glue) to give tons of "new" contact area :-D
post #54 of 126
Thread Starter 
Not,

I wasn't actually thinking of mating the dowels with each other where they crossed. Bill F. has said that the bracing was more for mating opposite panels of the enclosure. But I suppose mating the bracing would only make it stronger as a whole. If I did go with the MDF strips, what would you recommend for a minimum size?
post #55 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony_Gomez View Post

Then I'd use gorilla glue (or other foaming polyurethane glue) to give tons of "new" contact area :-D

Lol, that's not "contact" area, and glue by itself isn't going to be very strong.
post #56 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by fr8doggr View Post

Not,

I wasn't actually thinking of mating the dowels with each other where they crossed. Bill F. has said that the bracing was more for mating opposite panels of the enclosure. But I suppose mating the bracing would only make it stronger as a whole. If I did go with the MDF strips, what would you recommend for a minimum size?

Good idea if you go dowels then. If you go with wood strips, I just went with 3/4" so I could easily nail through it whichever way it ended up oriented. If you use wood strips, you'll need to join them for the extra support, as they're not as strong as a large dowel.

I used titebond and 1 1/4" brad nails to put mine together.

When assembling the top/front, I globbed PL on the end of the strips so it squeezed out in all directions. After that, I reached into the box and added more of the little wood supports and glued/nailed as the rest were. Fortunately, this box is large, so it made it easy. Even without doing that, I don't think it would have been an issue with the amount of PL I put on there and the tight tolerances.
Edited by notnyt - 2/19/14 at 8:12am
post #57 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by notnyt View Post

Using dowels as pictured above, I'd be concerned with the surface area where the dowels are mated with each other. There isn't that much room there for glue to hold. If one of those ever comes loose, you're in for some awful noise. If you used that same bracing scheme with MDF, you'd probably be fine as well. Gluing them where they intersect adds a great deal of strength as there is less unsupported length.

However, if you use strips of wood like pictured above, it would generally be a good idea to add some pieces, as pictured, to provide additional mating surface area on the walls. This also gives you something inside the box to nail to.

You can see hi-res here:

http://i.imgur.com/PLyIlXP.jpg

I agree with Not if you were using wood glue or something less durable. I did use PL on all joints and did notch them for more surface area (think link'n logs). I should not have any issue as we did test fits and the wood snapped before the joint.
post #58 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebuckaman View Post

I agree with Not if you were using wood glue or something less durable. I did use PL on all joints and did notch them for more surface area (think link'n logs). I should not have any issue as we did test fits and the wood snapped before the joint.

Notching it solves the problem entirely as long as all the surfaces line up flush.
post #59 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by notnyt View Post

Lol, that's not "contact" area, and glue by itself isn't going to be very strong.

moderately foamed urethane glue is very strong!
post #60 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by fr8doggr View Post

Not,

I wasn't actually thinking of mating the dowels with each other where they crossed. Bill F. has said that the bracing was more for mating opposite panels of the enclosure. But I suppose mating the bracing would only make it stronger as a whole. If I did go with the MDF strips, what would you recommend for a minimum size?

Hey Nick.. Incorporating both will work just fine. The main thing about bracing is that it keeps your enclosure from flexing. I like to incorporate splines now with mating them panel to panel but it's certainly not called for.
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