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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Top Receivers.....Yamaha RX-AV3030, Pioneer SC-79 or Anthem 710
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Top Receivers.....Yamaha RX-AV3030, Pioneer SC-79 or Anthem 710

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I little bit different comparison here. I am looking for almost exclusively the best receiver for movies, since i have little time for 2 channel music listening anymore. If you have noticed, I do not have any Audyssey XT32 receivers becuase I like to tweak a little after the calibration and Audyssey doesn't allow that. As you can see in my sig i have older Pioneer Elite receivers, but I am willing to branch out now, if I have to.

As I understand, The Anthem has the best setup and possibly sound with ARC, but lacks some features such as a height channel, 9.2 amp and other features. It seems that YPAO on Yamaha's has been improved and now calibrates the sub. Also, Yamaha has great sound modes and great power from their top receivers. Now Pioneer, which i know well has MCACC which I think is good but hasn't been updated in years and still does not calibrate the sub, but they are powerhouses and still do sound great.

I am looking to improve my overall sound first, then features and power comes next, especially since I can always add an amp later. So what are the general thoughts on the receivers listed and tell me if you think I should add another like the Denon 4520 to my list?
post #2 of 22
Thread Starter 
Anyone?
post #3 of 22

Of those three, I would go with Yamaha.  And probably go with last year's model and save some money:

 

http://www.crutchfield.com/p_022RXA3020/Yamaha-RX-A3020.html?showAll=N&search=yamaha_rx-a3020&skipvs=T

 

Judging from online complaints, Yamaha receivers are as reliable as you can get.

 

Most likely, though, changing out your receiver will only affect the sound with different settings (which, of course, is what different calibration will do).  It isn't as if you have cheap junk now.  If you want an improvement in sound, look for better speakers.  Since you do not have cheap junk speakers either, getting much of an improvement in sound will likely cost you plenty.

 

You are already at a pretty high level of quality, and so you might want to just continue to enjoy what you have, until you need a new feature, or come into a huge pile of money that you want to blow.

 

Or, perhaps, consider acoustic treatments in your room, depending on what your room is like.

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice. I figured that since my receiver was several years old that enough improvements in recent years have been made to warrant a new receiver. I am kind of leaning to the Yamaha, especially since i have never tried one. I have never had an Anthem either, but I am wondering if ARC is good enough to offset its lack of features?
post #5 of 22
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mixdoctor View Post

Thanks for the advice. I figured that since my receiver was several years old that enough improvements in recent years have been made to warrant a new receiver. I am kind of leaning to the Yamaha, especially since i have never tried one. I have never had an Anthem either, but I am wondering if ARC is good enough to offset its lack of features?

ARC doesn't have any more post auto-EQ adjustments than Audyssey, so if you want to tweak the "auto" settings you won't be happy.

post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by primetimeguy View Post

ARC doesn't have any more post auto-EQ adjustments than Audyssey, so if you want to tweak the "auto" settings you won't be happy.


The Anthem is indeed "tweakable" post auto eq. The review below states so.

http://hometheaterreview.com/anthem-mrx-710-av-receiver/
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 View Post

The Anthem is indeed "tweakable" post auto eq. The review below states so.

http://hometheaterreview.com/anthem-mrx-710-av-receiver/

The things you can tweak post eq are the same things you can tweak with Audyssey. Neither allows tweaking of the target curve. ARC gives you the flexibility to choose the max eq freq and room gain but not post eq.
post #9 of 22
I guess a better question is what do you want to tweak post auto eq?
post #10 of 22
I just received my RX-A3020. I paid $1,349.99 open box from Crutchfield - currently selling for $1,499.99 NIB. I ran YPAO and then tweaked levels and EQ to get the sound I wanted. I though YPAO was too flat and bright for me. I tested Air Force One on regular DVD and Avatar on Blu-ray tonight.
For these ears, compared to my Yamaha RX-V2090/DDP-2 it replace, absolutely a sonic sound with a level of cleanliness I wasn't expecting. I suppose different speakers may yield different results, but my ADS L1290's screamed.
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
I have to see if i can find the differences between the Yamaha 3020 and the 3030. I seems like YPAO is at least catching or even surpassing MCACC as far as what it can do?
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mixdoctor View Post

I have to see if i can find the differences between the Yamaha 3020 and the 3030. I seems like YPAO is at least catching or even surpassing MCACC as far as what it can do?

THis was my first time using any sort of automatic room correction. I was a little disappointed in YPAO's assumption of what good sound was which is why I'm glad I was able to make adjustments afterwards, right down to individual speaker db levels.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
I does seem like YPAO is similar to MCACC in that you can adjust the parameters after it has run. Wish Audyssey XT32 could do that. Sometimes you want a little more at 16Khz and need to adjust. With Audyssey, as I understand, you have to disable the main functions to use the EQ.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalManCPA View Post

THis was my first time using any sort of automatic room correction. I was a little disappointed in YPAO's assumption of what good sound was which is why I'm glad I was able to make adjustments afterwards, right down to individual speaker db levels.

It seems that with any of these auto EQ solutions, mic placement is pivotal and very sensitive, with poor results more easily attainable than optimal ones. I know that is how it was with Audyssey - there was something of a learning curve in how to position the mic. Not that it's extremely complicated, but it seems more people get poor results the first time or two than not. Audyssey redesigned their mics, which seemed to help too. Yamaha's mic seems to resemble the old mics Audyssey shipped with Denons. I haven't tried YPAO yet, but my general rule with Audyssey supported products has always been: if at first you don't succeed (you don't get pleasing results) try and try again. I'd keep playing with YPAO too. Several reviews I've read seemed to think the version of YPAO in the 3020/3030 to be comparable to Audyssey XT32 - even though they don't seem as evenly matched on paper. So, I'd exhaust all possibilities for improper mic placement and other AVR settings before tempering the EQ manually.
Edited by Chad Varnadore - 2/15/14 at 5:28pm
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad Varnadore View Post
 
It seems that with any of these auto EQ solutions, mic placement is pivotal and very sensitive ...

 

Yes.  One must not only put the microphone in exactly the right place, but it must be oriented correctly.  I suspect that many people fail to read the manual and follow the directions exactly, which, of course, will lead to less than optimal results.  And then, after improperly using the equipment, blame it instead of placing the blame where it belongs.

post #16 of 22
ARC produces the best sound overall IMO so I'd lean in favor of the Anthem, however, the 510 would probably be enough in your setup. Having recently acquired the 310, I can confirm that although you're able to make adjustments to ARC after measurements such as crossover, room gain, etc., you cannot produce your own EQ curve like you can with YPAO or MCACC.
post #17 of 22
Doesn't seem that enough posters have taken into consideration the OP's speakers. Some of the suggestions would have a hard time driving those Ascends. I feel like the only ones on his list that may do it are the Pioneer, Anthem, and maybe add the Denon 4520. May be wrong but don't think so. After using a Yamaha A3000 I felt that it would not have been able to drive speakers like those. It got pretty hot just driving Paradigm Reference speakers on music and movies at moderate levels. The H/K 7550HD on the other hand never even got warm. JMO.
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
It would be nice to have a receiver that can drive my 4 ohm Ascents and incoming Theater center, it's not crucial. I have a Rotel 985 MK II that while not a powerhouse can drive my speakers to a decent level. I do like the concept of the Anthem and ARC is probably the best, but it seems like they are not the best value. Not many features, you have to pay full pop , find a place that sells them and maybe get on a waiting list until stock arrives. Meanwhile, I can get the Yamaha and Pioneer for less than retail and they have more features and are easier to get.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 View Post

Doesn't seem that enough posters have taken into consideration the OP's speakers. Some of the suggestions would have a hard time driving those Ascends. I feel like the only ones on his list that may do it are the Pioneer, Anthem, and maybe add the Denon 4520. May be wrong but don't think so. After using a Yamaha A3000 I felt that it would not have been able to drive speakers like those. It got pretty hot just driving Paradigm Reference speakers on music and movies at moderate levels. The H/K 7550HD on the other hand never even got warm. JMO.

 

He does not say what is hooked up to what, but he has a separate power amp:

 

Rotel RMB 985MKII

 

If that is driving his speakers satisfactorily, he can continue to use it, so what the amplifier section does in his new receiver will be irrelevant.

 

 

However, the Yamaha RX-A3020 has been measured as putting out 275 watts into 4 ohms at clipping with 1 channel:

 

http://www.soundandvision.com/content/yamaha-rx-a3020-av-receiver-page-4

 

And 258 watts into 4 ohms with 2 channels driven.

 

That does not sound like a wimpy amp section to me.

 

And before I hear grumbling about "all channels driven," that is not terribly important, as soundtracks do not demand full power into all channels simultaneously and does not represent real world use.  For more on that, see:

 

http://www.audioholics.com/audio-amplifier/the-all-channels-driven-acd-amplifier-test

post #20 of 22
^^^^^Agreed. Totally overlooked the amp in OP's sig. Any of his choices will do what he needs.
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 View Post

^^^^^Agreed. Totally overlooked the amp in OP's sig. Any of his choices will do what he needs.

No, it's my bad, I actually didn't have the amp in my sig when you posted. After you posted, i figured i should put the amp in as to not make power the focus of a receiver choice for me.
post #22 of 22
Gone right off Onkyo after my Nr905 decided to intermittently die Hdmi wise. Spent $750 on replacement to find now even worse. (Out of warranty of course) Moving in the Anthem 710 this evening.
Pretty excited!!
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