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post #8581 of 8664
I entered the channel 43 and got 2.1 and 2.2 back
post #8582 of 8664
Got tired of signal dropout so I finally bought an outdoor antenna and put it up on the side of the house (20 feet up) pointing toward the towers (7 miles away). I get every channel great EXCEPT the usual weak suspect, 17.2/27.2/37.2. Just doesn't make sense. I can get it with an indoor rabbit ears but it's very quirky, it has to be positioned just right for it to come in. It's a very basic antenna. Would a better one work?
post #8583 of 8664
It's the station; low-powered signal, not the best xmitting equipment, etc.,...I get it pretty good except in severe weather, it drops out/pixels then, calm and foggy, I get a "70", go figure.... I'd just orient your antenna toward it (as I've done for the best signal and forget it), it'll probably take a large antenna with a significant gain thats high on the UHF band to make enough difference, check connections, maybe raise the antenna, etc., but, I'm a good 14+ miles away LOS and I feel your pain. Since intro of METV and ATV I watch very little RTV anyway...g'luck:) ( I have a Weingard 1080P attic mounted single story house with a single 75+ foot run of RG6 cable to my Toshiba Regza TV, I've got the orientation to about 1" for best capture of 17.2)
Edited by JeffinWesternWA - 5/29/13 at 6:00pm
post #8584 of 8664
7 miles isn't that far for a TV signal, unless you have something
in the way.

If you think that the weak signal is your problem, you can try
a higher gain antenna (try the AntennasDirect XG91, it has the
highest gain at those frequencies), or you can try an amplifier.
Make sure you have any strong non-TV signals (like FM radio)
filtered out.

However, a weak signal isn't their biggest problem!

They doubled the transmitter power on 2011-12-28, but the quality of
the signal went DOWN, so reception is actually worse despite the
increased power.

The loaner half-power transmitter was putting out a HIGHER QUALITY
SIGNAL than their normal transmitter.

I get 100% signal strength and 90% signal quality and still get
bad packets from them.

Maybe they should have a bake sale to raise funds for a better transmitter?
post #8585 of 8664

HD news finally on KPTV.... Will wonders never cease!

 

 

ron

post #8586 of 8664
I guess it's another sign that this "high definition" fad isn't going away any time soon.

I've been reading people complaining of not being able to see stuff on their old 4:3 TV sets. Although everything on ABC is supposed to be 4:3 safe, the scale on Extreme Weight Loss was on the edge of the widescreen so these viewers never got to see out how much weight the person lost.
post #8587 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

I guess it's another sign that this "high definition" fad isn't going away any time soon.

I've been reading people complaining of not being able to see stuff on their old 4:3 TV sets. Although everything on ABC is supposed to be 4:3 safe, the scale on Extreme Weight Loss was on the edge of the widescreen so these viewers never got to see out how much weight the person lost.

I CAN'T WAIT for 4:3 safe crap to go away. It looks so bad. I hate ESPN on ABC games because the graphics are 4:3 safe. Same with most networks and some other channels, too. It's stupid. This is 2013, not 1993.
post #8588 of 8664
Tell that to my Mother.
She's got an HD 16x9 television she feeds from a standard def Comcast box.
"I don't care, don't mess with it! It looks fine!"
post #8589 of 8664
Cable and satellite companies need to start an "outdated equipment" fee. This would raise the money to get rid of SD all together. It would force many subs to get HD equipment and stop wasting bandwidth. Stop charging for HD and start charging for SD.

Nothing is sadder than an incorrectly set up TV. "It's HD cuz my TV is HD." *facepalm.
post #8590 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by ejb1980 View Post

Cable and satellite companies need to start an "outdated equipment" fee. This would raise the money to get rid of SD all together. It would force many subs to get HD equipment and stop wasting bandwidth. Stop charging for HD and start charging for SD.

Nothing is sadder than an incorrectly set up TV. "It's HD cuz my TV is HD." *facepalm.

The problem with this is that these people who are low-information and low-knowledge are the most price sensitive. Piss them off, and the cord cutting revolution begins.

With that said, the changes being made at Time Warner Cable to streamline the channel lineup, have HD and SD numbers the same, and you get whatever your box allows is what I hope we keep seeing in the future. With only 1 edition, bandwidth is saved and idiots can live in the dark ages as long as they want to.
post #8591 of 8664
Ok guys,

I have a question. I am cutting out DirecTV and going OTA with a TiVo Roamio. All the channels come in fine and look great (I'm in Salem) - however, on Fox - 12.1 I think it is.. the one where they show shows like Masterchef... well I am trying to watch it tonight, and it's very strange.

Seems like some commercials are in full HD, and fill the screen fully, then it comes back to Masterchef and it looks like a lower def signal letterboxed on a 4:3 - like it's floating in the middle, black on all sides, but it's being broadcast like that - the signal still stays "HD", and as I said, commercials are in HD and look great. Oh and the sound is very low, only on this channel.

What is going on here? Why would they do this? The only time this happened on DirecTV was when the local station "broke in" to run a ticker of breaking news over the signal - that's what it's like.

Here's DirecTV followed by the TiVo (same issue on another ATSC tuner TV, so it's not the TiVo) Ignore the blur - low shutter speed in the dark...




Thanks,

Brant
post #8592 of 8664
Has KSLM 27.2 been reducing their signal at certain times of the day? Seems like whenever I turn it on to watch something my signal is zero. Other times when I check it's coming in.
post #8593 of 8664
I like that KOIN is giving us the full bandwidth for HD and even giving us DVD quality audio, but I have to admit that football has been looking terrible. The mosquito noise and pixelation doesn't reflect the bandwidth they're using. Even Sunday Night Football on KGW looks better.
post #8594 of 8664
I see a TV station in San Francisco has 11 subchannels (12 total) plus 8 audio channels.
post #8595 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbpdx View Post

I see a TV station in San Francisco has 11 subchannels (12 total) plus 8 audio channels.
Man, I really want to watch that channel. Are they trying to emulate the snow from my childhood?
post #8596 of 8664
I live in NE Portland near 41st and Fremont and am looking to buy an OTA antenna. I think we're around six miles away from the transmitters in the West Hills, and Antennaweb recommends a small multidirectional antenna. Any suggestions given my location? We're up on the Alameda Ridge, but there are some trees and houses between us and the transmitters. It would be nice if an indoor antenna was sufficient, but I'd be willing to mount something outside if that would greatly increase the odds of pulling in a good, consistent signal for the major broadcasters.

The impetus for this is Comcast now scrambling every single channel, even the local ones. I missed their notice in their last bill (my wife tossed it without telling me). I have an Eye TV connected to a Mac Mini that I was using as a DVR to record the local clear QAM channels. I don't want to rent their DVR or a Tivo. I pretty much only record the bigger broadcasters: ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CW, PBS.

I'd like to get something locally if possible.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I've skimmed this thread, but there's a lot to wade through.

Thanks.

Shawn Marshall
post #8597 of 8664
I'm so close to you that I've probably run past your house. I'm using a UHF/VHF Yagi in my attic. I think I got it a Radio Shack. The only problem being this close is that a Yagi may be so directional that you can't receive both clusters of antennas on UHF. To fix that you simply turn the outer elements 90 degrees. That reduces the "directionality" (probably not a word) of the antenna and you point it between the clusters.

This antenna is probably overkill. I set it up almost ten years ago with a first generation ATSC receiver which was extremely sensitive to multipath. Receiver are much MUCH better now. You could easily start with cheap rabbit ears and see if they work well enough (I'm using them with my bedroom TV).

Our distance is ideal. I get all stations at 85 or greater.
post #8598 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

I'm so close to you that I've probably run past your house. I'm using a UHF/VHF Yagi in my attic. I think I got it a Radio Shack. The only problem being this close is that a Yagi may be so directional that you can't receive both clusters of antennas on UHF. To fix that you simply turn the outer elements 90 degrees. That reduces the "directionality" (probably not a word) of the antenna and you point it between the clusters.

This antenna is probably overkill. I set it up almost ten years ago with a first generation ATSC receiver which was extremely sensitive to multipath. Receiver are much MUCH better now. You could easily start with cheap rabbit ears and see if they work well enough (I'm using them with my bedroom TV).

Our distance is ideal. I get all stations at 85 or greater.

Thanks for the quick reply; I appreciate it.

I might be able to put an antenna in the southwest corner of our 2nd floor behind the knee wall. The attic over the ceiling up there isn't accessible. I'd probably have to run the cable down the outside of the house and then back in, at least for the time being.

I was poking around TVFool and generated this report:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46aeaf7555290b

It says I could probably get away with a set-top antenna, so maybe I'll play around with rabbit ears and move up to more sophisticated models if those don't work.

Cheers.

Shawn
post #8599 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by WShawn View Post

I might be able to put an antenna in the southwest corner of our 2nd floor behind the knee wall. The attic over the ceiling up there isn't accessible. I'd probably have to run the cable down the outside of the house and then back in, at least for the time being.

That's what I did. I didn't feel like drilling a hole through the footer of the attic wall and fishing coax down into the living room so I drilled a hole outside and ran it down the exterior wall along the chimney.

You know, just a temporary thing that's still there ten years later.
post #8600 of 8664
Quote:
You know, just a temporary thing that's still there ten years later.
smile.gif

Actually we plan to demo and remodel the room below that space, so it might not be too difficult to run that cable internally.

I played around with this ancient Radio Shack antenna I brought up from the basement:



I am able to pull in a usable signal with this if I put it up high, like on the mantle as shown, but that won't work aesthetically. If I put it on the same table as the TV, around 2 feet off the floor, the signal for some channels drops to unusable levels. I have no idea what the dial does on this thing, either.

Would a newer, more up-to-date indoor antenna deliver better results, or would I probably see poor results with anything placed low?

Cheers.

Shawn
post #8601 of 8664

Hello,

 

New to the forum. Please direct me to the proper place if this should go elsewhere. [EDIT: I posted this in the technical forum as well, ok yes I'm a bit antsy...in case that was a better location for diagnostic/troubleshooting than here]

 

I'm having issues getting the the local OTA channels.

After Comcast encrypted their QAM channels this week we've been left in the lurch. Trying to at least find a way to get channel 43 KATU (2.1) ABC so I can catch a fooskie ball game tomorrow (Saturday).

 

Here is a profile of where I live: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae5e7bc1f5fa

 

Right now I've got this setup:

up on a balcony 20ft up RCA 'pad' antenna with a fixed coax coming out > splitter (to connect the antenna with the next part) > 25ft coax cable to the TV.

 

The TV and antenna are on the south-facing side of our apartment. The picture (link below) showing the antenna closer up is showing directionality back towards the N/NE where the broadcast towers are located.

 

We just got this $30 pad antenna two nights ago to try a first step at getting the OTA channels we want, it can be returned to BB in a heartbeat.

If I need to get a different device to couple whatever antenna with my 25ft coax cable, and get remove the splitter (possibly causing issues)--I'm headed to radio shack after work.

 

 

Results:

Last night and the night before we got OPB 10.1/2/3. And were getting 8.1 (NBC) in really strong/well.  This morning I unplugged tv, let it sit a while. Then went through a full scan again. This time 2.1 (43) ABC KATU came in questionably, along with the OPB group, and FOX. But now 8.1 NBC was nowhere to be seen. Trying to get a 'read' on it manually adding was showing no signal at all.

 

How can it be this flighty? Within 12 hours, get a strong 8.1 and no 2.1 or 12.1 yet the next morning gets a weak 2.1 and 12.1 but no 8.1?

 

Yes, my setup is COMPLETELY jury rigged and not how I plan to keep anything. Seems like I need to remove splitter and get a better antenna. Or could the splitter alone be causing my troubles? At ground level ant>tv was just getting 8.1 and OPB group.

 

At the distance from the transmitters I would have expected better reception..

 

pictures:

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0BxYl3RAqCQBbZmROLWZsYTlyS2c&usp=sharing

 

Suggestions, help?

 

Thanks!


Edited by water- - 11/1/13 at 11:56am
post #8602 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by water- View Post

Hello,

New to the forum. Please direct me to the proper place if this should go elsewhere. I'm having issues getting the the local OTA channels.
After Comcast encrypted their QAM channels this week we've been left in the lurch. Trying to at least find a way to get channel 43 KATU (2.1) ABC so I can catch a fooskie ball game tomorrow (Saturday).

Here is a profile of where I live: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae5e7bc1f5fa

Right now I've got this setup:
up on a balcony 20ft up RCA 'pad' antenna with a fixed coax coming out > splitter (to connect the antenna with the next part) > 25ft coax cable to the TV.

The TV and antenna are on the south-facing side of our apartment. The picture (link below) showing the antenna closer up is showing directionality back towards the N/NE where the broadcast towers are located.

We just got this $30 pad antenna two nights ago to try a first step at getting the OTA channels we want, it can be returned to BB in a heartbeat.
If I need to get a different device to couple whatever antenna with my 25ft coax cable, and get remove the splitter (possibly causing issues)--I'm headed to radio shack after work.


Results:
Last night and the night before we got OPB 10.1/2/3. And were getting 8.1 (NBC) in really strong/well.  This morning I unplugged tv, let it sit a while. Then went through a full scan again. This time 2.1 (43) ABC KATU came in questionably, along with the OPB group, and FOX. But now 8.1 NBC was nowhere to be seen. Trying to get a 'read' on it manually adding was showing no signal at all.

How can it be this flighty? Within 12 hours, get a strong 8.1 and no 2.1 or 12.1 yet the next morning gets a weak 2.1 and 12.1 but no 8.1?

Yes, my setup is COMPLETELY jury rigged and not how I plan to keep anything. Seems like I need to remove splitter and get a better antenna. Or could the splitter alone be causing my troubles? At ground level ant>tv was just getting 8.1 and OPB group.

At the distance from the transmitters I would have expected better reception..

pictures:
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0BxYl3RAqCQBbZmROLWZsYTlyS2c&usp=sharing

Suggestions, help?

Thanks!
Digital TV signals are susceptible to bouncing off static or moving surfaces, and the microprocessor inside your digital receiver has to work very hard to decode a picture when direct signals mix with reflected signals.

Finding the sweet spot for locating and aiming an antenna is difficult because of those reflective surfaces. Sometime much effort is needed to find the sweet spot where all channels are steady and reliable. Moving the antenna can gain a channel and lose another.

The strength your screen displays indicates how the microporcessor is working, and when it concludes decoding is not possible it reports "weak signal" even though it could mean "signal bouncing exceeds ability to decode." The strength indicator is useful when probing for that sweet spot for your antenna.

Also, poor inline connectors between your antenna and receiver could pick up stray signals that could cause reception blackouts.

I agree your reception should be much better so close to the towers. As an experiment, take a paper clip and bend one end outwards. Stick that end into the center hole of the antenna connector on your digital receiver. Initiate a scan to see if results improve.

Also, too much signal can overload an amplifier, generating noise that could interfere with reception, and no amplifier is needed at 1.9 miles from the transmitting tower.
post #8603 of 8664

George,

 

Thanks for some of the clarification--do appreciate it, including making it clear I don't need an amplifier. I didn't know how far down this rabbit hole I was going to go. I've got to assume with the right set of variables I can probably get an effective solution that shouldn't be too complex.

 

Just to clarify your one suggestion, I should put the paper clip just right into the back of the TV where I plug the coax into?? Its possible that could actually be better than having just 6ft of cord and the pad antenna I bought? When I get home I'll absolutely give it a try none the less.

 

The biggest 'factor' I'm going to assume involved is that these towers are very close (2~miles). They're at the top of a big hill, of which I live on the side of, and below. Our TV is open to the south but if you were to keep a level line going towards the towers from the top of the TV, staying at the height of the TV, this line would be underground within 30ft--ie we're living on a slope.

 

I'll keep getting some advice, might try a different antenna as well, and will remove the splitter on the line and just get a type F male-to-male connector instead.

 

Thank you for your help!

post #8604 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by water- View Post

George,

Thanks for some of the clarification--do appreciate it, including making it clear I don't need an amplifier. I didn't know how far down this rabbit hole I was going to go. I've got to assume with the right set of variables I can probably get an effective solution that shouldn't be too complex.

Just to clarify your one suggestion, I should put the paper clip just right into the back of the TV where I plug the coax into?? Its possible that could actually be better than having just 6ft of cord and the pad antenna I bought? When I get home I'll absolutely give it a try none the less.

The biggest 'factor' I'm going to assume involved is that these towers are very close (2~miles). They're at the top of a big hill, of which I live on the side of, and below. Our TV is open to the south but if you were to keep a level line going towards the towers from the top of the TV, staying at the height of the TV, this line would be underground within 30ft--ie we're living on a slope.

I'll keep getting some advice, might try a different antenna as well, and will remove the splitter on the line and just get a type F male-to-male connector instead.

Thank you for your help!
The paperclip suggestion is only a party trick and not intended as a long term reception solution.

The paperclip circumvents wires and connectors and antennas and amplifiers and just indicates receivability at a particular location with all those variables removed.
post #8605 of 8664
i'm in the same bind now that Comcast has encrypted their channels. I'm in a tall apartment complex at 23rd and Burnside. Despite being on the 20th floor, with a Mohu Leaf all I can pull in are 3 PBS channels. I face north and it looks as though most channels are broadcast west of me. Does anyone have any amplified indoor antenna recommendations in the Portland area? Antennaweb suggest a medium directional antenna. Would love to try one of the old fashioned RS Double Bow Tie antenna.
post #8606 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by bennynihon View Post

i'm in the same bind now that Comcast has encrypted their channels. I'm in a tall apartment complex at 23rd and Burnside. Despite being on the 20th floor, with a Mohu Leaf all I can pull in are 3 PBS channels. I face north and it looks as though most channels are broadcast west of me. Does anyone have any amplified indoor antenna recommendations in the Portland area? Antennaweb suggest a medium directional antenna. Would love to try one of the old fashioned RS Double Bow Tie antenna.

Are you guys with the encryption problems using HTPC's or HDHomerun tuners? If that is the case today woot.com has the three tuner cable card device for $99. They are being closed out for the new models which will be shipping soon. No idea how comcast has the copy flags set however...

With the two of you so close to the towers I'm amazed you can't get better signals. I'm ~15 miles out and everything comes in really strong.
post #8607 of 8664

No, I'm not using anything myself.

 

Does a cable card tuner device decrypt the feed thats coming from comcrass...comcast?

 

While a paper clip did zilch for me, removing the splitter I was using to connect the cheapo non-amped antenna up on the roof to 25ft of cord running from the tv, replacing that splitter with just a male-to-male connector did wonders. I basically get everything, though getting KOIN (CBS 6.1 [40]) is difficult, which is crazy when I can get KATU (ABC 2.1 [43]) and they broadcast at the same strength, from the same height, from the same tower set/location. I think there is absolutely some truth about signal overload.  Just a gut feeling but I think in my case it is a little bit like this analogy: From the top of a mountain the most difficult areas to see are those on the flanks immediately below you--ie not the distance, but, immediately below you. Esp a big rounded mountain like Mt. Rainier. Ok so not that the west hills are anything like this exactly but the same principle, that i'm almost right under the dang towers so my line of sight isn't as effective as if I was just a bit further away.

 

I notice this with radio driving on terwilliger curves on I-5, AM/FM always get spotty there, because I think it is right under the broadcast towers and straight down is not the way they are broadcasting.

 

But I'm a layman with all this just conjecture.

 

What type of equipment would one use to remotely test these signal strengths? Not that I'd buy it but is there like some type of portable oscilloscope device (ok not that of course) that can get a read on them? I'd love to see how the signal fluctuates around my property but also say, 1 mile further away.


Edited by water- - 11/5/13 at 12:12pm
post #8608 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Dog View Post

With the two of you so close to the towers I'm amazed you can't get better signals. I'm ~15 miles out and everything comes in really strong.

That's how most broadcast antennas work these days. Most of the signal gets focused 4-20 miles away where most of the audience is. The signal closer to the antenna is much weaker. The signal levels in NW Portland are much weaker than at my house four miles away.
post #8609 of 8664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Dog View Post

Are you guys with the encryption problems using HTPC's or HDHomerun tuners? If that is the case today woot.com has the three tuner cable card device for $99. They are being closed out for the new models which will be shipping soon. No idea how comcast has the copy flags set however...

With the two of you so close to the towers I'm amazed you can't get better signals. I'm ~15 miles out and everything comes in really strong.


I saw that deal. It's a good one, but that means I'd have to sign up for their basic TV service which to me is not worth it. Desperately trying to avoid Comcast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

That's how most broadcast antennas work these days. Most of the signal gets focused 4-20 miles away where most of the audience is. The signal closer to the antenna is much weaker. The signal levels in NW Portland are much weaker than at my house four miles away.

What antenna would you suggest at a close location like NW Portland?
post #8610 of 8664
My coworker who lives close to Montgomery Park is using a UHF loop/rabbit ears antenna from Radio Shack with 100% success.
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