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A Screen Showcase & DIY Review - Page 2

post #31 of 244
Tryg,
I really enjoyed reading your review. Thanks for your efforts!

I'm shooting for a 120" diagonal 16:9 screen on my Panny 300 in a completely light-controlled room. Right now, I'm considering the matte white and the Da-lite HCCV. Two questions for you -- (1) do you have a preference of matte white material (EZTheater.com vs. Dazian)? and (2) Do you think the HCCV material would be better than the matte white or other DIY materials?

Best regards,
Chad in Austin
post #32 of 244
Thread Starter 
QQQ, I just did

thebland, Why would Don shake in his boots?

veid 5194 approximately 1 gain

krell69 Yes this took an considerable amount of my free time. I hope people can benefit from it. Also, I can only review what is sent to me.

Rob4x20 Winter Grey...but that's all it did. All three are great products and do very different things. They're all 10's for their own catagories.

Chad A, I think I would go with a matte white. I preferred the CV over the HCCV.
post #33 of 244
Tryg: which would you choose for a dlp projector: Highpower or a DIY paint (aluminum, or liquiscreen)? I have an X1. Thanks and great job! AVS should send you a free projector for your great work!
post #34 of 244
And everyone runs off into their separate corners with the piece of 'truth' that they personally believe to be some sort of "god's own". Not just screens, but in life, period.

Aluminum has a TERRIBLE color balance. This is why it is not used in screens that involve the idea of color balance. Soon as it is in some sort of emulsion, that shifted balance shifts even further. Some of the minor down sides. Long story.....Oh well. To each his own. Until the next truth comes along. Then add the fact that each particle has to be coated to prevent reactive situations from taking place, etc....then the fact that $3 cans of paint can't have much in the way of quality built into them.... hmmm....

I'm not trying to defend or denegrate any product. I'm merely looking at things with a bit less bias. Cheap can be good, but it ain't necessarily better. If it makes you feel good, go for it. have fun! Just remember the risks.

Why am I posting this? Just to be in the contrary position to help make sure this thread does not run into being a mutual 'yes man' kind of thread. Like I've mentioned before.. in the film '2001'..where the Monkeys go.. one after another... to beat onthe guy that is down.. with the stick.... in the mad rush of 'crowd following'. It may be 100k years later, but some things never change. I see it every day.

"Everybody, Everybody....calm down"... Henry Kissinger, in "The Pink Panther Strikes Again'
post #35 of 244
Well I just went out and made 1/2 size screens (one was"aluminium" the other "silver") to place against my matt finish light grey screen. The metallic finish screens were awful. Hotspotting and poor uniformity of finish (very blotchy). At first I didn't even see a difference in brightness until I stood up. You see my projector is on the coffee table, so with me sitting down, Iwas too off axis. I guess this is why the Firehawk should be used with ceiling mounted projectors. When I did stand up the image was way too bright, unnatural, and blotchy (due to my spray painting skill). I guess the metallic finish would be better served by a low lumen pj. My 1700 lumen pj (Mitsu XD200) is definitely too bright for such a high gain screen.
Damn, I thought I was going to be in heaven with my aluminium screen. I wonder if its worth repeating the experiment to try and get a more even finish to the screen.
post #36 of 244
Very interesting read; thanks for your efforts, Tryg!

I did a few experiments with aluminum/silver spraypaints (not the brands you tried, Plastikote in my case), and while the image really jumped off the screen they had severe color shifts. I remember Frodo's eyes turned bright green with one blend. So when the newness of it wears off, it may not be as terrific as it first seemed- then again, maybe you've found a version that doesn't suffer from these problems
post #37 of 244
Actually KBK, looking back at Tryg's photos, I think Goo looks quite good. It looks very similar to Firehawk on axis, but much better off axis. If Goo was easily available in AUstralia, I might give it a go. What puts me off is I'm no "handyman". Very poor skills with anything in the DIY department and seeing how badly I spray painted today, I don't think I'd be very good at applying Goo, given that others have had trouble in the past.
post #38 of 244
Actually KBK, looking back at Tryg's photos, I think Goo looks quite good. It looks very similar to Firehawk on axis, but much better off axis. If Goo was easily available in AUstralia, I might give it a go. What puts me off is I'm no "handyman". Very poor skills with anything in the DIY department and seeing how badly I spray painted today, I don't think I'd be very good at applying Goo, given that others have had trouble in the past.
post #39 of 244
Tryg,

Would a Dazian matte non-perforated white .95 screen mounted on a white wall need black backing?

Tom
post #40 of 244
Thread Starter 
KBK,
Conspiracy theorist? My DIY review isn't designed to be a definative solution to all problems. But if people go out and buy a $2 piece of white foam board and spray it with $4 worth of paint, let it dry, then put it up against their screen. Hmmm, they are gonna learn something for $6. Give it a try.

About color balance...

" Five basic inputs are needed to make a mirror: glass, a tin solution, a silver solution, a copper solution, and mirror backing paint. Most mirrors are made by placing clean pieces of glass flat on a conveyor belt, which moves the glass through the various stations where the solutions and paint are applied to the back of each piece of glass. The first layer applied to the glass is a tin solution, which is an adhesion promoter so that the silver will bond to the glass. After the tin solution, a silver solution is applied, which creates a metal film on the glass surface, giving the mirror its reflective surface. The third step is to apply a copper solution, which helps keep the silver from oxidizing and creates a surface to which the mirror backing paint will adhere. Finally, the mirror backing paint is applied. This adds a hard coating that protects the solutions from becoming scratched or damaged and further protects the silver solution from corrosion."

something to think about....


Tom Jones.
Backing? no. Look at my "preparing for a shootout" thread.
Backing only if theres a light source behind it.
post #41 of 244
My quote's better. So there!. All you get are the 'Bluehairs' throwing panties at you.

To be fair:
Check the spectral balance of the mirror quoted. First surface mirrors are better, but still not perfect. CR they do have though; which counts for alot. That's the charm side of the high reflectivity coatings. The high CR brings the impression of saturation, purely through perceptive conditionals. I'm toying with a 3500:1 (measured) CR DLP unit, and I tell you, the colors look dammed saturated, even though they are not really any better than any other unit. Itis purely due to perception because of the high CR. This is why many prefer the higher gain surfaces of some Screens.

I say: Start with a better projector.
post #42 of 244
Thread Starter 
Speaking of silver...

Here's a picture of the Draper F1500 material. It's very silvery looking. If anyone out there has this screen please tell us more about it and if you like it!




Ken, I totally concur. I think many think you can cure your projector issues with a screen. You must start with a good projector!
post #43 of 244
What surface were the paints applied to for the DIY screens?
post #44 of 244
Arrgghh. Every time I think I've made up my mind I read a review and change my mind. First it was behr perlescent, then parkland plastic, then Goo, then dalite high power, then liquidscreen, then high heat silver, then goo, etc.
post #45 of 244
I'm told that Goo will be displayed at the Melbourne Home Entertainment SHow end of April, so all us Aussies will be able to see it. Heck, I'm in Brisbane and I'm going to fly down to check it out. The airfares and accommodation are going to make it an expensive DIY screen, but who cares, its all fun.

link to the show is http://www.homeentertainmentshow.com
post #46 of 244
Not to sound like a moron, but have been to the Rust-oleum site, and there are many aluminums available. Can you give us their part number?
post #47 of 244
Thread Starter 
cpc,
the smples were just sprayed onto a piece of photopaper I had laying around. The bigger samples in the shootout were white art foamboard. Both have a very smooth surface.

Christer W.,
Go to the hardware store. Metallic Finish "Aluminum". White can, Red writing. Maybe the part number is 7715. Try others too. Just because I pulled that can off the shelf doesn't make it the best.


Did anybody do any Experimenting over the weekend? Results?

Most of my samples were sprayed on somewhat unpenatrable white surfaces. Better results may be acheived using a primer first. I'm thinking mostly for a nice flat surface but even a house paint that get's backrolled with a texture inducing roller could make a surface similar to the F1500 above. Then apply the Aluminum.
post #48 of 244
Tryg,

Have you come across Harkness Hall???

I'm using their High Contrast Grey 0.8 on a side chain driven 8ft roller blind with the weight bar filled with 6-7 kg of lead shot.

http://www.harknesshall.com/ds/high_contrast_grey.pdf
post #49 of 244
tryg,

random request, if you have a blacklight around, can you see if the high power or firehawk are uv reactive?

thanks!

Rob
post #50 of 244
Rob, uv reactive? curious about that one. Are you installing a tanning bed in front of your projector?
post #51 of 244
I just thinkit'd be neat if the screen could glow when not in use.

I love blacklights
post #52 of 244
I think there is a diy screen factor that bears mentioning here: TEXTURE!

As KBK has mentioned in several posts, the final texture of a diy screen plays a very large part in the results. In my opinion, using a roller produces the most consistent results. Not necessarily the best results, merely the most consistent. When two people apply the same product with the same spray equipment, there is often a major difference in texture.

This is really a problem with silver products, since a silver screen is basically a matte finish mirror.

In short, color & texture play nearly equal roles in diy screens, and with most products, only color is easily controlled.

Just my two cents!

Garry
post #53 of 244
so has anyone tried the Rustoleum High Heat Silver or the Aluminum spray paint in more depth yet? the potential for an inconsistent texture worries me... I wonder if those paints are available in 1 gallon containers so you can roll it on?
post #54 of 244
Thread Starter 
I wouldn't worry about anything until you've tried it.

I know there are probably hundreds of sceptics out there. Those that see for themselves will reap the benefits of knowledge.
post #55 of 244
The Rustoleum is an oil based product isn't it? I wonder how it would do sprayed on the vinyl side of blackout cloth, whether the oil would react with the vinyl?
post #56 of 244
based on this review, i bought a few cans of the rustoleum aluminum, and sprayed it on some white laminate stuff i found at lowe's. The results were spectacular, BUT my painting technique leaves a lot to be desired. I'm going to end up scrapping that screen because I couldn't get a good continuous even layer. I think once i screwed up the first coat, it was all over

That aluminum paint makes for REALLY nice colors, whites, and blacks though. I wish i could have gotten a good clean coat on it the first time.
post #57 of 244
I used Tremclad high heat aluminum via spray can (it's the Canadian version of rustoleum). It was very hard to get an even texture and you can definitely see some variance across the screen. I just ordered my projector yesterday so I'll let you know how it looks. If the texture problems do degrade the image I'll be changing to the aluminum rust paint which is available in quart sized cans. I will then try rolling it. It apparently has slightly more sheen which may be a good or bad thing.
post #58 of 244
stipling from rolling will cut a lot of the sheen. I am convinced that texture is as important as the pigment. I just dont know what the right texture is but I do know that some texture is good. lol

For the spray can guys - I didnt spray my screen but know that can aerosol spraying requires some finesse. You need to keep the can pointed straight at target surface and move the can parallel to it as well. You should overlap each pass by at least 50%. Then turn the piece and repeat at 90 degrees to the first one. This makes it easier to get full coverage.

If you have a decent internet connection check this video out It tells you all about spraying. http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/wvt061.asp
The quicktime version was really bad but the Real version worked great.
post #59 of 244
Thread Starter 
The trick is buying the stuff in a can and applying to a consistent factory textured surface like a wallpaper etc. more later

Also I broke out my black light to do some testing but it burned out when I plugged it in. I'll get a new one.
post #60 of 244
Quote:


Originally posted by Tryg
The trick is buying the stuff in a can and applying to a consistent factory textured surface like a wallpaper etc. more later

Also I broke out my black light to do some testing but it burned out when I plugged it in. I'll get a new one.


great to hear you're still working on the diy front, tryg. factory texture...nice.


and thanks for following up on the blacklight!



~rob
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