or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Screens › DIY Screen Section › DIY Aluminum paint rolls well. . . but. . .
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

DIY Aluminum paint rolls well. . . but. . . - Page 3  

post #61 of 514
Can anyone post screen shots of the "before" and "after" with this method - I would love to see how it preserves the whites and blackens the blacks. For me - I wasn't happy with my gesso silver,grey mixture. It did improve the blacks and overall contrast - but the whites took on a "dirty" look- so before I make the investment and "play" again - could someone posts some screenshots of the before and after - Please !
post #62 of 514
Ok here are some quick pic's of my last weekend screen; my first pass at making this screen. There are flaws but maybe you will get some idea how well it looks. Notice on right a window that is sun out there.
LL
post #63 of 514
Another pic
LL
post #64 of 514
One more
LL
post #65 of 514
Again
LL
post #66 of 514
Hey Rew452 - pics of the screen look awesome!

Here's a few shots of my theater and my DIY screen until I can get my web site updated.

Here's a picture of my new theater and screen.

P.S. My wife needs to clean her camera so ignore the spots!

No my room is not warped it the wide angel lens I had to use to get the hole front wall in!
LL
post #67 of 514
This one shows the contrast between the white fabric and the metallic on the screen.

P.S. Again the spots.... Again the wide angel lens!
LL
post #68 of 514
And here's an image taken from Dogs & Cats.
LL
post #69 of 514
I'd love to see a shootout between digital grey goo and ddog's magic mixture!

Eric.
post #70 of 514
Ddog
Very Impressive System!!

As I said earlier will be be doing a second version this weekend; You had said spraying a 45 deg angle will help to get metallic more even; did you mean at a up/down or a left/right angle??

Thanks
post #71 of 514
Very nice jobs ! Just one more question, what does the silver/glaze/white mix look like when mixed together ? Just so I can make sure I used the right ratio of ingredients. Maybe someone has a picture of the stuff after it's been mixed ?
post #72 of 514
tbusquet

If you check page 3 of this thread I gave formula converted to oz. It will make just over 16 oz. The just over is I added additional white to silver/glaze mix to get better whites. Should be about 17 oz. total.

Remember to thin with distilled water for spraying (30%) I don't know about rolling the metallic.
post #73 of 514
Rew452,
Try Spraying "Kitty corner" in a cross hashing motion from bottom left to upper right to even things out.

Ddog!!
post #74 of 514
Quote:
Originally posted by Rew452
tbusquet

If you check page 3 of this thread I gave formula converted to oz. It will make just over 16 oz. The just over is I added additional white to silver/glaze mix to get better whites. Should be about 17 oz. total.

Remember to thin with distilled water for spraying (30%) I don't know about rolling the metallic.
Yeah, I understand and your explaination is perfect. But here is why I asked.

Since I live in Holland the products you guys are using aren't available here, so I found some substitute products which will hopefully match the ones you've used. We're on the metricsystem overhere, and I was able to convert the units, so that's no problem. But still the thing is, every product (brand) has a different combination of ingredients, so the silverpaint that I bought might be thinner than the one you used, so I would have to use a different mixing ratio. If I would have a reference (picture or someone could describe the mix) I would be able to match it as close as possible.

Hope someone can help me with this.

Thanks !

btw. I have to roll the paint on since I don't have any spraying gear and no room to spray in.
post #75 of 514
tbusquet,

If your going to roll it I would try doing a small sample first that was unreduced and see how that works for you. If that dosen't work well then try reducing it a little until you get the right mixture.
You'll know when you've got it right because you get that "I've got it right feeling inside"

Ddog!!

PS. Just remember that this is not Rocket Science!
post #76 of 514
Quote:
Originally posted by ddog
tbusquet,

If your going to roll it I would try doing a small sample first that was unreduced and see how that works for you. If that dosen't work well then try reducing it a little until you get the right mixture.
You'll know when you've got it right because you get that "I've got it right feeling inside"

Ddog!!

PS. Just remember that this is not Rocket Science!
Yeah, you're totally right there. I understand that it's not excat science and that I have to experiment. Thanks for all your help !
I'm going to do some tests on a piece of MDF (my screen is MDF) and see what works best. Thanks again !

Tbusquet in desperate search for the magic recipe ;)
post #77 of 514
If your going to use MFD then I would Primer it really good let dry and then block sand it smooth with 320 grit sand paper. By doing this, this will give you a beautiful surface to paint on!!

Ddog!!
post #78 of 514
tbusquet

Sorry!
I forgot your earlier post about being in Holland. I am not sure how to help, since I believe it really revolves around the Behr Silver metallic. All other parts I am pretty sure could be subbed.
post #79 of 514
Hey Rew452,

I think tbusquet just wants to eyeball the tint/color of the mixture you have so he can reverse engineer a similar mixture. Before exato-machine color mixing doo-hickeys in your local Lowe's and Home Depot, artists used to do that by intuition and reflex (and many still do it today). :2)

Welp, I'm off to finish my final touches on my own DIY experimentation. I should be able to give you all my results in the next couple days.

I think I found a way to make a silver screen on the s00p3r ch34p (pardon the l33t), but I'll know for sure tomorrow, as my inaugural HT 'break-in' party puts it to the test. Stay tuned.

that's my 3 yen.

--- DanekJovax
post #80 of 514
Rew and Ddog - thanks so much for the pics - Ddog - could you take just one more pic - with the raw blackout cloth up infront of your screen like before- but this time with a projected image on it - so we can get a good idea of the difference between the raw and painted blackout cloth. Thanks Again!
post #81 of 514
Here are a few pics with the image projected on it showing the difference between the two fabrics.
LL
post #82 of 514
here's another one
LL
post #83 of 514
last one
LL
post #84 of 514
This may be just plain crazy...
but I notice that a lot of people are having a lot of problems with evenness of application. (Specifically those who don't have/can't afford an HVLP rig.)

What if you bought extra paint, thinned it a bit more than normal, poured it directly onto the screen, then tilted the screen in all different directions (in much the same way that you tilt a frying pan around to coat the bottom with cooking oil) so that the paint runs to all edges and the entire surface is covered.

When done, set the screen down so that it's as level as possible and let gravity and the laws of physics do the rest. Of course, you'd have to put down a drop cloth and/or a lot of cardboard to catch all the runoff, but in the end, liquid should seek its own level and you should get a very, very smooth surface (right?)

Drying time would, of course, be considerably longer, so you may want to suspend a large cloth over the screen to act as a dust shield while it dries. You could reapply as necessary if you need to thin it out too much to make this work. This would be a bit wasteful with regard to the paint, but even if you bought twice as much paint, it's still cheaper than an HVLP rig, and should, I think, produce smoother results than rollers.

Just a thought...
post #85 of 514
In short, I'd have to mostly agree with ElvisIncognito, that HPLV is the way to go for evenness of coating.

I've already found that rolling paint can cause evennes problems, though I'll state that evenness depends on several application variables:

- The amount of paint put onto the roller.
- The distribution of the paint on the roller.
- The general consistency of the paint being applied.
- The porosity of the material being painted (vinyl/plastics are less porous than cotton/polyester cloth/canvas).
- The way the paint is being rolled onto the screen.
- The reflectivity (gloss) of the paint.
- One's own level of klutziness (read: to not step on the screen, or into the paint pan THEN step onto the screen).
- The ambient dust level of the application room.

There may be more than what I've listed here, but I think my point is made. There are many methods to minimize these variables and come up with a generally good and even application of paint, but I'll stick to a few here to keep things short:

1) Use a paint that is even in its consistency and will not dry too quickly. I would recommend oil-based paints for this, even though they're a lot messier than other types of paints. If you can execute a good coat in short time, then work with the water-based latexes and enamels, though I don't think that you can get good reflective paints in other than oil-based mediums.

2) Make sure the roller used is EVEN all around. The use of a foam rollerhead will help this a lot, as foam holds its shape a lot better than the fuzzy-head rollers.

3) Putting the paint onto the roller should be in slow motions from within the paint pan. Move once from in the 'pool' of paint at the bottom of the pan, giving the roller a good soaking all around, pulling the roller slowly out of the pool and up onto the ribbed area (I forgot the term for this part of the pan). Be careful not to 'push' too much paint onto the rolling area or you'll slop paint out of the pan. Moving towards the paint pool slowly, pressing lightly on the roller to remove any excess paint and leaving an even saturation of paint on the roller. The roller SHOULD NOT DRIP when you pick it up from the pan! If it's dripping, run it a few more times on the ribbed area to squeeze off excess paint until it no longer drips.

4) As others have mentioned in avsforum, painting a screen with a roller involves moving from edge to edge in one fluid motion, preferably along the horizontal of the screen. An initial coat can be applied along the vertical, but make sure the final coats are along the horizontal dimension.

5) In general, flat and matte coat paints need fewer coats, where enamels and glosses need more. Especially for FT projection systems, avoid the super gloss surface and 'mirror' effects. This is where hotspotting the projected image comes from. Use glosses and enamels either as a base for flats/matte overcoats, or use a more textured substrate cloth/paneling material to break up the gloss surface. The use of a fine sand paper after gloss application can help break up the smooth surface and reduce hotspotting as well, though be REAL careful not to sand through the all-critical projection coating.

6) Use a non-porous substrate material to ensure an even coat and use less paint. Cloth is a good choice for 'transparent' screen systems (to put speakers behind), but a more difficult choice to apply a good even coating of paint, as these cloth screens have a habit of absorbing the paint without really allowing the same reflective advantages as if the same paint was painted on a vinyl or plastic substrate. To compensate, use a thicker paint, or apply more coats. Just know that with the pores between the cloth weave can unevenly 'fill' and cause blotching, and no number of coats of paint will totally remove this blotching effect. If you require an absolutely FLAT surface for viewing your movies, cloth should be used either as UNPAINTED (use the natural tone of the cloth) or painted WITH MUCH CARE, preferably before it is stretched onto a frame.

7) Dust. The bane of painters. It is impossible to remove all dust from a good coating of paint, but you can minimize its damaging effects to an otherwise even, unblemished screen:
- Clean and dust the painting room prior to painting the screen, including dusting the tables, doors, windows, and vacuuming the floor with a HEPA-equipped filter vacuum cleaner. Then wait a couple hours to let the remainint ambient dust settle.
- Lay a non-lint drop cloth as a painting base. Plastic drop cloths are preferred here, though don't touch any electronics while doing this, since many plastics and static electricity are bedfellows.
- Arrange your paint, rollers, and screen in a way where you only need to stand in place as you apply the coat(s) of paint. Less movement means less dust being kicked up or 'generated' from your movement.
- Wear clothing that's freshly cleaned, and if you have longer hair, pin it up or tuck it under a shirt. Hair getting into a screen coat is a real eyesore once it's discovered on a screen, and nigh unto impossible to remove without blemishing the even surfacecoat. Not to mention that getting paint in the hair is a b!@t$h.
- If you have pets, absolutely keep them OUT of the room during this whole process! I'm sure we all have a couple stories we could tell about our pets getting where they should be at that 'critical moment'. ;2)


Well, I've used about 50% of these suggestions in my screen last weekend (current living conditions simply cannot warrant all of them being followed), and I still need a few more coats of paint on my screen as it is still a little too reflective and is hotspotting a little too much, but I should be able to give all the juicy details when I get it done. Stay tuned.

That's my 3 yen.

--- DanekJovax
post #86 of 514
Rew452,
Did you get a chance to work on your screen?

I finally got the automation all hooked up to mine.
I made my fixed screen so that the screen will slide up the wall(with electric motors) to mask the bottom of a 235:1/240:1 image and I have top masking that comes down from the valance(with an electric motor)for the top of a 235:1/240:1 image.

I call this my Automated Fixed Screen Masking System!

Take a close look at the Pics that I posted earlier in this thread and you'll see the screen masked to a 185:1 screen. Now with a touch of a button the screen will mask it's self to 235:1 or 240:1.........Kool!!!

Ddog!!

PS. I hope to have my Wed Site up dated either tonight or tomorrow
post #87 of 514
ddog, you're my idol!

I'm confused though, should a screen be painted (with an HVLP gun) before or after it's stretched on a frame? BTW, you can guy a wagner finecoat HVLP rig for about $100, that's the one I have.

Eric.
post #88 of 514
So Dose that make me the next American Idol? He Heeeeeeeeee (You should hear me sing) Ha Ha

Now on a more searest note, the screen should be stretched onto the frame before it's painted.

Ddog!!
post #89 of 514
hey ddog,

I'm wondering that since you're using an HPLV gun to paint a screen, it's better to have that screen framed before painting, as opposed to rolling a non-framed screen? I just know it's troublesome to roll paint on a framed screen as to roller tends to bend the screen material (if cloth/vinyl) near the frame in such a way as to make streaks in the coating.

Hence my previous comment on pre-painting a screen before framing if using a roller, to prevent this streaking. Is this something you'd agree with?

that's my 3 yen.

--- DanekJovax
post #90 of 514
Yes, I would agree, but I would probobly (like I did on my screen) router the inside edges of the frame and resiese( about 1/2 - 3/4 of an inch depending on how thick your frame is) and router both sides of all cross supports (I took mine off while I painted mine). I also ripped the cross supports down on a tablesaw so the frame still lays flat up against the wall.

Ddog!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: DIY Screen Section
This thread is locked  
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Screens › DIY Screen Section › DIY Aluminum paint rolls well. . . but. . .