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post #61 of 1226
OK. I have lurked around these forums long enough. Thanks to everyone for all the wonderful advice I have gotten in the various forums here.

I decided to order the Roku HD1000 instead of building an HTPC, mainly due to time constraints. I have wanted to be able to do HD slide shows on my Mitsubishi HD TV ever since I got it. That is the main reason I got the Roku HD1000, although I am hoping to be able to play HD MPEG2 content that I develop on PC's in the future.

My Roku HD1000 arrived the other night. I hooked it up to the HD TV (1080i) and put in a compact flash card with some vacation pictures. The Roku played a slide show with no problems and my wife agreed that it was the next best thing to getting the old slide projector out and looking at slides.

Last night I attempted to get the Roku working on my home network. I have wired my house with Cat5 wiring and have a number of computers networked in a peer-to-peer network. I have a mixture of Windows98SE and WindowsXP Home computers running 100MBit Ethernet through a D-Link switch. I was not able to get the Roku to see any of these computers shared drives or folders. The 100MBit led on the back of the machine comes on and I see the 'activity' led beside it flash and the D-Link switch port for the Roku is on and flashes when I bring up the Roku. The help PDF files on Roku's web site were of no help. Has anyone been successful in hooking their Roku HD1000 to their network? Any additional advice on how to get the Roku to work on my home network will be appreciated.
post #62 of 1226
Sherlock - Your post gives no indication of a wireless setup in your home. If you don't have one, you need it for networking on the Roku. The WiFi adapter plugs into the USB port on the Roku, and then looks for a wireless router/hub.
post #63 of 1226
I thought the Roku had an integrated Ethernet port on it :confused:
post #64 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by dandrewk
Sherlock - Your post gives no indication of a wireless setup in your home. If you don't have one, you need it for networking on the Roku. The WiFi adapter plugs into the USB port on the Roku, and then looks for a wireless router/hub.
That's not accurate. Wireless via USB is one option for connecting the HD1000 to the network. There is also an RJ45 Ethernet Jack on the back of the unit for connecting it to wired 10/100 ethernet networks.


Sherlock, as for your difficulties accessing your shares, I suggest calling or emailing support (http://www.rokulabs.com/support/) so that we can help you get connected.
post #65 of 1226
sherlock.. this is my guess

a mixed network of win98 and whatver requires netbeui to be installed on each machine. I imagine that the roku does not have it.

hopefully tech support can help you out

-Jeff
post #66 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by RokuPatrick
That's not accurate. Wireless via USB is one option for connecting the HD1000 to the network. There is also an RJ45 Ethernet Jack on the back of the unit for connecting it to wired 10/100 ethernet networks.


Sherlock, as for your difficulties accessing your shares, I suggest calling or emailing support so that we can help you get connected.
I am connected to the RJ45 Ethernet Jack on the Roku. I don't have a wireless LAN.

I sent an eMail technical support message to Roku this morning, but have not heard anything back. I am at work and not at home.

As to the mixed Windows version environment, I actually went to the trouble of connecting the Roku HD1000 to a 4-port D-Link switch with just one other computer on the switch. I tried a WindowsXP Home system first, then a Windows98SE system. The Roku found neither systems shared resources. Is there any quick way to verify the ethernet on the Roku is working?
post #67 of 1226
Hi Sherlock!

Sorry you're having difficulties. Two quick things to try. If you go into the "Setup" screen (click the Setup button on the main menu), there should be an IP address displayed at the top of the Setup menu. If there's no IP address, then the HD1000 may not have been able to get an IP address. Are you running a DHCP server on the network that is accessible to the HD1000?

Assuming that you have an IP address, you could "ping" the HD1000, assuming that there's a ping utility on the Windows box, just to be sure that the network between the Windows machine and the HD1000 is good.

Lastly, there is a setup document on the web site detailing the steps for setting up your Windows computer for sharing files. Check out that document and make sure that the Windows machine is all set up.

I use my HD1000 at home with my XP Pro box without difficulty, so I can attest that it's possible. :)
post #68 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by JustMike
Hi Sherlock!

If you go into the "Setup" screen (click the Setup button on the main menu), there should be an IP address displayed at the top of the Setup menu. If there's no IP address, then the HD1000 may not have been able to get an IP address. Are you running a DHCP server on the network that is accessible to the HD1000?

I use my HD1000 at home with my XP Pro box without difficulty, so I can attest that it's possible. :)
I don't remember seeing an IP address last night. I don't connect to the internet from my home network. I doubt my D-Link Switch has DHCP. I am not a networking guru (as you can probably tell). Can Windows provide the DHCP function? I don't doubt that the HD1000 can network and am glad to hear you are having no problems.
post #69 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by SherlockH
I don't remember seeing an IP address last night. I don't connect to the internet from my home network. I doubt my D-Link Switch has DHCP. I am not a networking guru (as you can probably tell). Can Windows provide the DHCP function? I don't doubt that the HD1000 can network and am glad to hear you are having no problems.
If you don't have a DHCP server than your windows machines will assign themselves IP's using APIPA.(Unless you did it)
Just assign your Roku this IP it will probably work.

169.254.100.100
Netmask 255.255.0.0

It is a good idea to check your ip's on your other machines to make sure they didnt automaticly assign themselves this ip.(two machines can't have the same one)

In 98 use the command at the command prompt
winipcfg
In XP it is on the support Tab under the connection properties.
post #70 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by SherlockH
I don't remember seeing an IP address last night. I don't connect to the internet from my home network. I doubt my D-Link Switch has DHCP. I am not a networking guru (as you can probably tell). Can Windows provide the DHCP function? I don't doubt that the HD1000 can network and am glad to hear you are having no problems.
If it's just a switch, then yes, it's doubtful that it has a dhcp server. Do you have TCP/IP set up on your Windows boxes? If so, are you giving them static addresses or just allowing windows to figure out an ip address (169.x.x.x)?
post #71 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by bdraw

Just assign your Roku this IP it will probably work.
In the current release of software, the HD1000 requires a DHCP server nor networking. We don't currently provide an interface for assigning a static IP.
post #72 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by trancer23
a mixed network of win98 and whatver requires netbeui to be installed on each machine. I imagine that the roku does not have it.
Microsoft droped Netbeui with Win 2000.

You have to have Netbios over TCP/IP installed on 98 or insteall Netbeui from the Win XP CD.

Since netbeui isn't use by default in XP or 2k I would go with Netbios over TCP/IP

Starting with windows 2000, Netbios over TCP/IP is the default.
post #73 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by RokuPatrick
In the current release of software, the HD1000 requires a DHCP server nor networking. We don't currently provide an interface for assigning a static IP.
Ok good to know.

If you setup windows XP for "Internet Connection Sharing"
It will act as a DHCP server.
I have never tried this without actually having an Internet connection.
It might work as long as you have either two network connections.(modem, Network card, Firewire card).
post #74 of 1226
Also, Windows XP by default has the firewall activated. With the firewall, you will never be able to see the machine. Go into the advanced tab in the network properties and disable the windows firewall.
post #75 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by slocko
Also, Windows XP by default has the firewall activated. With the firewall, you will never be able to see the machine. Go into the advanced tab in the network properties and disable the windows firewall.
Good suggestion.
The firewall is enabled by default on some windows XP machines.
I do know that here at work the new Machines we get from Dell with XP Pro do not have it enabled by default. It may depend on where you bought your computer from.
post #76 of 1226
I will update the status of my problem getting my Roku HD1000 to see my home network resources.

I noted a message above from 'RokuPatrick' about calling or emailing support at Roku. From Roku's web site, you can only email a problem to support. There is no mention of calling for support. I emailed my problem to Roku Thursday morning at 9:30am. As of 9:30am Friday morning, I have not heard anything from Roku.

I decided to put a message in this forum since they are so active. I am not a networking guru and wanted to make sure it was not some dumb thing I was doing that was causing my problem. Once it became obvious that I needed a DHCP server, I called a friend of mine who is much more knowledgable. He told me I could buy a router with DHCP server function or I could possibly try a software solution. I decided last night to try the software avenue first. I downloaded the 'haneWIN DHCP Server' package (sorry I am not at a level in these forums where I can put in URL's). I installed it on my WinXP-Home system. I was never able to get the HD1000 an IP address or see my WinXP shared resources. I did see messages in the 'ignore' column of the DHCP Server package when I brought up the HD1000, but I was not able to figure out what I needed to do in the DHCP Server package to allow the HD1000 to obtain an IP address. I did verify that the firewall in my WindowsXP system was off.

I guess my problem should serve as a warning to others considering the Roku HD1000 to first make sure you have a DHCP Server on your network. Hopefully at some point, assuming I am not the only person who buys a Roku HD1000 that doesn't have a DHCP Server, Roku technical support will create a document that details step by step how to establish one, both via a hardware solution and a software solution.

My thanks to everyone who helped me establish the reason that I can't network my Roku HD1000. I would ask for your help in solving this problem, but I don't think these forums are the best avenue for doing that.
post #77 of 1226
wow, if it's this complicated to set up this unit to a computer, I'm going to have to pass. I'm not a Joe Six-Pack (I'm Dean Micro-brew, thank you), but this seems like a lot of work beyond my computer skill level.

Until they adopt plug and play for the USB port, I'll wait...
post #78 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by SherlockH
I will update the status of my problem getting my Roku HD1000 to see my home network resources.

I noted a message above from 'RokuPatrick' about calling or emailing support at Roku. From Roku's web site, you can only email a problem to support. There is no mention of calling for support. I emailed my problem to Roku Thursday morning at 9:30am. As of 9:30am Friday morning, I have not heard anything from Roku.
I'm not sure what page you looked at, but at the link I provided, http://www.rokulabs.com/support/ it states:
Quote:
For Customer Support, please contact Roku via email at: support@rokulabs.com.

To speak with a Customer Support representative by phone, please contact Roku at 1-866-400-7658 (ROKU) between the hours of 8:00AM to 5:00PM (Pacific Standard Time), Monday through Friday.

Quote:
Originally posted by SherlockH

My thanks to everyone who helped me establish the reason that I can't network my Roku HD1000. I would ask for your help in solving this problem, but I don't think these forums are the best avenue for doing that.
I'm sorry you've encountered problems. You have a network configuration we clearly didn't forsee: a home network without any kind of DHCP server (they are usually provided by the router/firewall). I've made a note that we need to support this configuration, and I will try and make sure it gets added in a future software release. If you call support or email me (check your Private Messages) I'll help you get up and running.
post #79 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by skoolpsyk
wow, if it's this complicated to set up this unit to a computer, I'm going to have to pass. I'm not a Joe Six-Pack (I'm Dean Micro-brew, thank you), but this seems like a lot of work beyond my computer skill level.

Until they adopt plug and play for the USB port, I'll wait...
It is not difficult to set it up. The issue here was the lack of the required DHCP server. If there had been a DHCP server on the network, as there is with nearly any network with a broadband router, then I suspect that his issues would have been far fewer to nonexistant.

The USB is plug and play for wireless (if you use a tested and approved adpater). Of course, you have to configure it for the security settings of your particular wireless network becauseif we did that for you, we'd be cracking your network. :p
post #80 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by RokuPatrick
If you call support or email me (check your Private Messages) I'll help you get up and running.
My apologies to Roku Support. You are correct. There is a support phone number. I probably forgot about it since I was wrestling with the networking problem outside your telephone support hours.

I also apolgize for not understanding (as a new member to these forums) that there is a 'Personal Message' capability on these forums. Thanks for prompting me to go learn about this and to read your message.
post #81 of 1226
Got a question about using a 1080i situation. Most of my photos are 1600 x 1200, slides 35mm, Toshiba 3.2 mega digital and work from Adobe photoshop 7. While the pictures have a great rendition on the plasma 60", I have to resize everything to utilize in the screen saver where I show them. Anyone know of a quick and dirty way or a software program to do this. I brought webshots screen saver up some time ago in this thread and really didn't get an answer which I could undertstand.
For example. . in the webshot screen saver you drag and drop a photo into it. If it's kodak photo disk, tiff, whatever, it converts it to Jpeg automatically. If it's the wrong size, it automatically resizes it into a 3 x 2 format. Anything around that I can use for a 16 x 9 format?
Hummer
BTW Pat. . .if the two day shipping deal is still on, send me another unit and this time add the bracket. Put it on my card :p
post #82 of 1226
RokuPatrick,
Does HD1000 support shared folders that are password protected? I have Windows 2000 server that share folders that requires user name and password to access.
post #83 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by hummer
Got a question about using a 1080i situation. Most of my photos are 1600 x 1200, slides 35mm, Toshiba 3.2 mega digital and work from Adobe photoshop 7. While the pictures have a great rendition on the plasma 60", I have to resize everything to utilize in the screen saver where I show them. Anyone know of a quick and dirty way or a software program to do this. I brought webshots screen saver up some time ago in this thread and really didn't get an answer which I could undertstand.
For example. . in the webshot screen saver you drag and drop a photo into it. If it's kodak photo disk, tiff, whatever, it converts it to Jpeg automatically. If it's the wrong size, it automatically resizes it into a 3 x 2 format. Anything around that I can use for a 16 x 9 format?
I'm not sure I yet understand why you want/need to resize your photos to display them on the HD1000. THe HD1000 has 3 options for displaying images:
  • Fill -- the image is cropped and zoomed as necessary to fill the entirety of the 16x9 display. For a 1600x1200 image, this would result in a 1600x900 section from the middle of the image being displayed.
  • Fit -- the entire image is displayed in its original aspect ratio. For a 4x3 image, this would mean there would be black bars on the left and right of the image.
  • SmartDisplay -- The HD1000 will automatically choose fit or fill depending on the aspect ratio of the image. If the image is too wide or too tall, it displays the entire image, otherwise it will fill the screen with the image.
Are these options somehow inadequate for what it is you are trying to do?

To what screen saver are you referring when you state "I have to resize everything to utilize in the screen saver where I show them" ?
post #84 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by bton
RokuPatrick,
Does HD1000 support shared folders that are password protected? I have Windows 2000 server that share folders that requires user name and password to access.
In the current software, no. The HD1000 requires the shares to be accessible to the user "Guest" with no password. We are working on a solution for password-protected shares, however.
post #85 of 1226
Picked up my HD1000 earlier today and have been trying out pictures on it all afternoon. In a word, incredible! I've got the HD1000 configured for 1080i output and connected to a 42" HD fujitsu plasma (P42HHA10WS) and the quality from my hi-res digital pictures is awesome. It's like having a 42" picture frame. the handling of picture sizes seems very flexible - the "smartdisplay" mode picks reasonable scaling views of the images making it unnecessary to scale separately (an initial question of mine).

I had no trouble getting the hd1000 to connect to my existing network in my home and see the PCs on the net - just plugged the net cable into the back and it worked.

if you have a hi-res display and want a high quality way to preview your digital pictures, this is a great device to get. short of a htpc (which could output a hi-res image), it sure beats trying to view digital pics in ntsc format (either from dvd or other non-hd device).
post #86 of 1226
Very impressed with the picture file feedback everyone is leaving.

I have two very good libaries of files the Roku may access (pictures and music) on my home network, but having to use a monitor to control audio playback is a adoption BARRIER for a networked device.

We have a HT stereo in the living room (zone 1) connected to a HDTV display. The HT stereo has multiple zone capability to pipe audio sources (i.e., HD1000) into other rooms while allowing zone 1 audio sources to be played back separate frone zone x audio sources. For example, our kitchen is a heavy music playback area (zone 2) while we are watching football or something else in zone 1.

I've trained my wife how to use the Audiotron browser interface to control music for zone 2 (kitchen). It is very simple for her to use. Kind of like the Yahoo website.

Roku needs to address multi-zone audio users who have a home network as a priority to grow adoption. Of course, I understand the browser interface is not trivial, but it is necessary to deal with a networked device IMHO. And wives! Any web interface needs to be have a high WAF (Wife Acceptance Factor).

If the HD1000 had the Audiotron web interface capability, our family would buy two and sell the Audiotrons on eBay. The wife would be thrilled to view digital picture files of the kids, trips, etc. while also viewing home video that I've ripped to a hard drive on the network.

Keep growing the HD1000's capabilities! But most of all, address the networking aspect as a top priority please.

Thanks,
Duffin
post #87 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by RokuPatrick
It is not difficult to set it up. The issue here was the lack of the required DHCP server. If there had been a DHCP server on the network, as there is with nearly any network with a broadband router, then I suspect that his issues would have been far fewer to nonexistant.:p
I will accept the judgement that I don't have a 'typical' home network and hope for Roku's sake they are correct. I attempted to use a software solution to provide the required DHCP server on my network, but was not able to get it working, probably due to my lack of knowledge about all of this networking stuff. Since I needed to add some switch capacity to my home network, I decided to buy a Netgear router / switch that had the required DHCP server function. I swapped the Netgear box in place of my D-Link switch and the HD1000 immediately showed an IP address when I went to the network setup screen. I had no problems after that accessing the shared resources on my WinXP notebook.

Thanks to everyone for their help in quickly figuring out my problem with networking my HD1000. At least I can move on to learning more about my HD1000.
post #88 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by SherlockH
I will accept the judgement that I don't have a 'typical' home network and hope for Roku's sake they are correct.

Thanks to everyone for their help in quickly figuring out my problem with networking my HD1000. At least I can move on to learning more about my HD1000.
I'm very glad to hear that you got your HD1000 up and running on your network.
post #89 of 1226
I understand there are three primary areas of interest with the current HD1000.
1) Audio - improving the capabilities offered here.
2) Video - providing the promised ability to play HD Video through a network connection.
3) Slide Shows.

I want to hopefully address the Slide Show area and how we may be able to create better ways to use the HD1000 in this area. Would it be best to create a new thread specifically for each of these three areas?
post #90 of 1226
Quote:
Originally posted by brente
to prep pics for display at 1080i, should I scale (or crop) them myself down to 1920x1080 to get the best possible quality from the Roku box?
This question really never got answered. I have a number of digital photos that I want to crop down to a specific area. Is 1920x1080 the proper (best) resolution when you are displaying images on a 16:9 format HD TV at 1080i?

Are there any plans to support any additional image formats other than JPEG?
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