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The Official AVS Antenna and Related Hardware Topic! - Page 505

post #15121 of 16113

I'm familiar with those stations. I assume your main interest is in the Greenville-area stations, not the ones from Charlotte that also appear in your list. Your biggest problem is with WLOS (ABC) and WHNS (FOX) which are way down in the red zone. Many people in Greenville have trouble with WLOS because it tends to be blocked by the front line of mountains on the SC/NC border, even though it's way up high on Mt. Pisgah near Asheville. (I get decent reception with WLOS at 83 miles because I don't have that blockage, and I use the YA-1713 that Calaveras mentioned.) It looks like you have similar blockage problems with WHNS and even with WYFF (NBC) which is near Caesar's Head and has a clear view over most of the area.

Simply raising the antenna might help. Try running TVFool again with an antenna height of 25 or 30 feet.
post #15122 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtbell View Post

Your biggest problem is with WLOS (ABC) and WHNS (FOX) which are way down in the red zone. [...] and even with WYFF (NBC) which is near Caesar's Head and has a clear view over most of the area.

It just dawned on me... the top stations on your list, at 3.3 miles, are on top of Paris Mountain. The stations noted above are in pretty much the same direction and therefore are probably being blocked by Paris Mountain. If that's your problem, you'll have to use a really sensitive antenna, get it up as high as you can, and hope the strong signals from Paris Mountain don't kill your reception of the weaker stations by overloading your tuner.

If you go to TVFool's online coverage map browser

http://tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=80

and enter, say, WHNS, you can see the "shadow" of Paris Mountain clearly, and zoom in on the map to see whether you're in it.
Edited by jtbell - 9/18/12 at 6:03am
post #15123 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

The Jack antenna is a small antenna with a single (short) VHF dipole and a small UHF LPDA array. In general, a low-gain, not very directional antenna usually suitable for short range usage. In all, it's a good compromise for an RV due to its very compact size.
If you're getting stations from 155 miles away, it's not because you have a stellar or magic antenna, it's because you were experiencing exceptional atmospheric propagation of a signal that originated from well beyond the horizon. Google "tropospheric ducting" for details. Those stations won't be around long so have fun with them while they last.
Thanks, I did mount it on the roof and couldn't get the extra channels, so you were right on. I will leave it in place to see how it deals with rain and snow fade. I'm hoping the amplifier helps with that. I noticed turning the amplifier on and off didn't make any difference on the VHF channel 13 station as the signal remained about 80% either way.
post #15124 of 16113
Hello,

I am wondering if there is a difference between

(what I have right now)
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11694069&znt_campaign=Category_CMS&znt_source=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032189

and

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=12349516&znt_campaign=Category_CMS&znt_source=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032189

Additional info:

I currently live in South Brooklyn, in a second floor apartment of a six story brick building facing south. All towers are located directly north (about 9-15 miles). With the Antenacraft, I am able to get CBS, NBC, FOX, and UPN. I am unable to get ABC, CW, or PBS.

All I need are the channels listed before.

Indoor antenna is ideal; I'm not sure if I am able to install an outdoor antenna. Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
post #15125 of 16113
All of your stations come from the Empire State Bldg, so you are a lot closer that 9 miles from there, more like a mile or 2.

Those antenna you posted are amplified, something not needed and probabbly killing your signal. You need something as simple as this indoor budget antenna from Radio Shack:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103077&znt_campaign=Category_CMS&znt_source=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032189

Problem is your Apt faces south with no Line of sight to the ESB, so you have to move the antenna in a sweet spot by a window maybe.The higher you mount the antenna the better.

Also ABC, CW and PBS are VHF stations, which are a litte harder to get with an indoor antenna than the other stations which are UHF. But I bet its because of the amplified antenna you have. Try the budget antenna and test.
post #15126 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikepier View Post

All of your stations come from the Empire State Bldg, so you are a lot closer that 9 miles from there, more like a mile or 2.
Those antenna you posted are amplified, something not needed and probabbly killing your signal. You need something as simple as this indoor budget antenna from Radio Shack:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103077&znt_campaign=Category_CMS&znt_source=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032189
Problem is your Apt faces south with no Line of sight to the ESB, so you have to move the antenna in a sweet spot by a window maybe.The higher you mount the antenna the better.
Also ABC, CW and PBS are VHF stations, which are a litte harder to get with an indoor antenna than the other stations which are UHF. But I bet its because of the amplified antenna you have. Try the budget antenna and test.

Hi Mike, thanks for your helpful answer.

I actually did try that antenna at first but i had two problems

1) I don't have much room in my media center or window sill to place the antenna and make adjustments (signal was okay; I probably should have tried again after the thunderstorms but i returned it)

2) the ugliness doesn't help much with the wife factor
post #15127 of 16113
double post
Edited by Beanturd - 9/21/12 at 12:23pm
post #15128 of 16113
Quote:
2) the ugliness doesn't help much with the wife factor

Better be careful how you say that one! wink.gif
post #15129 of 16113
One thing for sure is you do not need an amplified antenna.

With the budget antenna, the loop is for UHF channels, and the rabbit ears are for VHF channels,in your case 7,11, and 13. Try to aim the ears broadside to the south in hopes the signal will bounce off a bldg. Or if the Verrazanno bridge is within your sight, try aiming for that to maybe capture the bouncing signals. Otherwise your only other option is to put something on the roof. It does not need to be big.
post #15130 of 16113
Hi, Did anyone try these two antennas Phillps MANT940 and Phillips SDV8625T/27. The former (MANT940) is something I tried long time back (borrowed from a friend), and it was great. I am looking for something similar or better, but is not sold anymore locally. I can find this new Phillips SDV8625T/27 locally and looks very similar to MANT940. Any experiences?

Also, I tried the GE Futura Antenna and though it is good, it is flaky on a couple of channels. Is there a way where I can use 2 similar antennas close together to get a better signal? Would it technically work? If so can I just use a splitter to do it (in reverse)?

I am about 23 miles from the stations, but any antenna location would be oriented away from the station direction. These are the only antennas that worked.


Thanks.
post #15131 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by cableuser001 View Post

Is there a way where I can use 2 similar antennas close together to get a better signal? Would it technically work? If so can I just use a splitter to do it (in reverse)?
I am about 23 miles from the stations, but any antenna location would be oriented away from the station direction. These are the only antennas that worked.
Thanks.

I'm probably sounding like a broken record but there is no magic to DTV reception and no magic antennas. For reliable reception the antenna needs to be high enough to clear all the local obstructions. As soon as you no longer have this condition like when the antenna is blocked by trees or buildings or is inside a building, you'll be dealing with multipath and reduced signal strength especially on VHF since it is poor at penetrating buildings. Whether any antenna works under less than optimal placement is just luck of the draw. No can tell you for sure which antenna will work the best in you situation. You're likely to get hugely different results with any antenna simply by moving it around the room.

Stacking indoor antennas is unlikely to improve your results. Antenna stacking in normally reserved for outdoor arrays to achieve specific results. Sounds like you're thinking that if one antenna receives this station and another receives that station then connecting the two together will receive both stations. Don't count on it.
post #15132 of 16113
I am trying to find an antenna for my girlfriend who lives in Middletown, Oh. 45044, woodridge dr, and wondering what strength antenna we need to pick a few local HD channels. Nothing specific in mind, but budget is probably only $35. Its about halfway between dayton and cincinnati, so it's hard to get much (is my guess from an attempt with an FM antenna)

any thoughts?
post #15133 of 16113
According to TV Fool it should be quite easy:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3dcc49a2823be684

If you want a more precise table go to tvfool.com and enter the address and exactly how high the antenna will be. It won't take a very big outside antenna to work.

Chuck
post #15134 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by preludejtstyle View Post

I am trying to find an antenna for my girlfriend who lives in Middletown, Oh. 45044, woodridge dr, and wondering what strength antenna we need to pick a few local HD channels. Nothing specific in mind, but budget is probably only $35. Its about halfway between dayton and cincinnati, so it's hard to get much (is my guess from an attempt with an FM antenna)
any thoughts?

A good antenna that has pretty good gain numbers that I have installed twice now for friends of mine on a budget is the Winegard 7015. Check amazon.com or solidsignal.com
post #15135 of 16113
I have two antennas with separate ChannelMaster 7777 amplifiers, both on a remote and difficult part of the roof to get to.

One of the antennas started returning no signal. Before climbing out, I just felt the inside power supplies and noticed that the one on the failed antenna was cool to the touch, while the still-working one was warm. (Duh.)

But my question is this: If I swap power supplies to diagnose the non-working antenna, is there some potential failure mode out at the amp on the mast that would cause this good power supply to fry itself?

Or, to put it another way, does the cool power supply indicate that it's the inside power supply that failed on that preamp -- and not the part mounted way out on the mast? Thanks!
post #15136 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwillie6 View Post

But my question is this: If I swap power supplies to diagnose the non-working antenna, is there some potential failure mode out at the amp on the mast that would cause this good power supply to fry itself?

I don't suppose you have a voltmeter that you could measure the output voltage on the cool supply?

I believe the risk of what you want to try is very low but not zero. Most power supplies have over current protection and won't burn up if you short them out, especially briefly.
Quote:
Or, to put it another way, does the cool power supply indicate that it's the inside power supply that failed on that preamp -- and not the part mounted way out on the mast? Thanks!

Probably, but even an unloaded power supply can use a little power and cause the supply to be warm.

You could put the working supply on the non-working antenna and see if that combination works. Again, low risk but not zero.

I'd swap supplies before taking down the antenna but I have a multi-meter for troubleshooting.

You assume the risk here.
post #15137 of 16113
I'd swap supplies before taking down the antenna but I have a multi-meter for troubleshooting.

You assume the risk here.


Thanks -- much appreciated . . . always dealing in probabilities. smile.gif
post #15138 of 16113
wildwillie6:

This thread might help you:

CM7777 preamp failure question

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1336632/cm7777-preamp-failure-question
post #15139 of 16113
wildwillie, I assume you have the original 7777 preamp from Channel Master. I think the original power supply may still be available directly from Channel Master, or perhaps Warren Electronics. But probably any replacement power supply may work. Although you don't hear many recommendations regarding the new 7777 version, and the noise figure may be not as good. And no more dual inputs. Winegard is now probably a better preamp choice, and Antennacraft now has dual input models available as well.
post #15140 of 16113
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3dcc4968d1d499da
This is from the Southside of Chicago.

Good day all, I have been running an HD antenna since I moved in my house (six years).

At first I used an indoor antenna I used when I lived downtown. It worked okay, but was very directional, so it didn't work with recording shows.

Then I discovered a rooftop antenna in my attic, and connected that. It was pretty darn good, and could actually tune in every station at once, but anytime the weather shifted (storm/pressure/seasons...) we would lose a station at random. It was extremely picky regarding the exact direction. I had full signals on nearly all stations even after a splitter, so I wondered if the signals were too strong.

I decided to downsize the antenna and bought the Antennas Direct DB2 (not DB2e). I mounted it in the attic on a rod that pokes through my ceiling so I can manually rotate it. I found the right direction and finally reached antenna nirvana.

Then my wife wanted a north facing bay window and as part of that we replaced some siding and soffits. The window had a metallic coating, the siding has foil covered insulation underneath, and of course the soffits replaced wood with aluminum.

Since then we have never been able to get all of the stations at once using any of the antennas. When I point to the direction shown on TV Fool, I get almost everything but CBS and WCIU. CBS works best with the antenna pointed straight east, WCIU is random. However, even when we angle in the right direction, sometimes we lose stations after a day or sometimes we even lose our signal when the computer starts recording. Regardless it always seems way too finicky, a night and day change since they did the work on the house.

If anyone has any advice, it would be appreciated. I just bought a second tuner so I could connect two separate antennas, but even then I have very low confidence. Maybe it would be okay if the computer was smart enough to choose between the two signals and select the best one, but as far as I am aware, that is not possible.

Thank you,
Bob
post #15141 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdcollns View Post

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3dcc4968d1d499da
This is from the Southside of Chicago.
Good day all, I have been running an HD antenna since I moved in my house (six years).
At first I used an indoor antenna I used when I lived downtown. It worked okay, but was very directional, so it didn't work with recording shows.
Then I discovered a rooftop antenna in my attic, and connected that. It was pretty darn good, and could actually tune in every station at once, but anytime the weather shifted (storm/pressure/seasons...) we would lose a station at random. It was extremely picky regarding the exact direction. I had full signals on nearly all stations even after a splitter, so I wondered if the signals were too strong.
I decided to downsize the antenna and bought the Antennas Direct DB2 (not DB2e). I mounted it in the attic on a rod that pokes through my ceiling so I can manually rotate it. I found the right direction and finally reached antenna nirvana.
Then my wife wanted a north facing bay window and as part of that we replaced some siding and soffits. The window had a metallic coating, the siding has foil covered insulation underneath, and of course the soffits replaced wood with aluminum.
Since then we have never been able to get all of the stations at once using any of the antennas. When I point to the direction shown on TV Fool, I get almost everything but CBS and WCIU. CBS works best with the antenna pointed straight east, WCIU is random. However, even when we angle in the right direction, sometimes we lose stations after a day or sometimes we even lose our signal when the computer starts recording. Regardless it always seems way too finicky, a night and day change since they did the work on the house.
If anyone has any advice, it would be appreciated. I just bought a second tuner so I could connect two separate antennas, but even then I have very low confidence. Maybe it would be okay if the computer was smart enough to choose between the two signals and select the best one, but as far as I am aware, that is not possible.
Thank you,
Bob

Well, the good news is, you can directly blame your wife for the antenna snafu and use that to your advantage for some future endevour in which you want to partake... (just kidding).

The best scenario that I can see is to move the antenna outside. That should readily solve your problem. You, I would think, be immediately back in business.
post #15142 of 16113
Has anyone tried the Avermedia HomeFree AVplus tuner? Looks
like an alternative to the HDhomerun Ethernet tuner, with the
addition of analog a/v inputs.

I haven't found any info on what RF front end or demodulator it uses.
Wondering if it would get better reception than the hdhomerun.

The other problem is how to talk to it from Unix.

http://www.avermedia-usa.com//AVerTV/Product/ProductDetail.aspx?Id=497
post #15143 of 16113
Hello All!

We are planning on cutting our Subscription to Dish and want to start using and Antenna to pull in stations to watch.

Here is my location and the stations I have available to me:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3dcc49430c375608

I am quite handy at building things and I would like to build an antenna to put in my large Attic (if that can work) or worst case put it on a mast on top of my house.

If I put an antenna in my Attic it would be about 25' up from the ground.

Two Main questions:
1 - What type(s) of antennas do I need in order to pull in the most stations?
2- Do I need any signal boosters.
extra Credit - Point me to the best DIY Design for your recommended antenna.

I have read several articles and I see several references to Gray-Hoverman Antenna. I am not sure if this will fully meet my needs or not.

http://www.crdahl.com/antennas/sbgh.php

Any and all input is welcome.

Thanks!

Steven
post #15144 of 16113
Steven,

An attic antenna might work but I wouldn't recommend it in your situation. Your 8 stations are in various directions so you're going to need a rotor. I can almost guarantee you that those 2 edge stations won't come in 100% of the time. The bigger and higher the antenna for those stations the better. Your antenna will need to clear all the local obstructions (trees and buildings) for the best chance at those 2 edge stations. You have two high VHF stations and the SGBH is not a VHF antenna although it might work on RF 9 because the signal is strong.

I'd recommend a Winegard HD7698P for a combo antenna or a 91XG and YA-1713 (or equivalent) for separate VHF/UHF antennas.

If this is primarily a DIY project for experimentation then build the SGBH with a reflector and one of my high VHF log periodic antennas.

http://www.aa6g.org/Lp/lp.html

For a rotor I don't recommend the inexpensive TV antenna rotors. I'd go with the Yaesu G-450A for long life and accurate pointing.

Don't get carried away with a high gain preamp. The Winegard HDP269 is good enough and won't get overloaded by your couple of strong stations.

Chuck
post #15145 of 16113
Chuck - I appreciate the input to for my TV situation.

Later this month I will start to do some work and see how things work for me.

Steven B.
post #15146 of 16113
Steven, you need to go to the source on Gray-Hoverman designs at http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=121956. The latest designs offer excellent performance for UHF and VHF-HI.
post #15147 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Loudin View Post

Steven, you need to go to the source on Gray-Hoverman designs at http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=121956. The latest designs offer excellent performance for UHF and VHF-HI.

The source for the designs appears to be here:

http://clients.teksavvy.com/~nickm/index.html

And there's some instructions for actually building them here:

http://www.instructables.com/id/GH10n3-Gray-Hoverman-TV-Antenna/

I could not find the F/R for UHF but I did see the F/R for high VHF and it's not very good. It wouldn't be useable here because of my reflection issues.

Chuck
post #15148 of 16113
post #15149 of 16113
Hello all. I know nothing about antennas, and would like assistance or suggestions on which one might work best in my home. Here are my results from TV Fool: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3dcc498a50830da6

Edit: I guess I should mention that I tried the Mohu Leaf, and while it did pull in about 14 channels, I am wondering if there is something out there that is "better" (indoor). I'm sure I would get better results if I put it in a window, but it creates an eyesore so I am trying to avoid that.
Edited by ROW25 - 12/12/12 at 10:00am
post #15150 of 16113
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROW25 View Post

Hello all. I know nothing about antennas, and would like assistance or suggestions on which one might work best in my home. Here are my results from TV Fool: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3dcc498a50830da6
Edit: I guess I should mention that I tried the Mohu Leaf, and while it did pull in about 14 channels, I am wondering if there is something out there that is "better" (indoor). I'm sure I would get better results if I put it in a window, but it creates an eyesore so I am trying to avoid that.

You're in a location where no indoor antenna is likely to give you satisfactory results. There are no magic antennas. You need an outdoor antenna where you are that is designed to receive both high VHF and UHF. If you're interested in pursuing that we can help you, otherwise there isn't much we can do.

Chuck
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