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The Official AVS Antenna and Related Hardware Topic! - Page 512

post #15331 of 16114
This is my attic setup. I actually moved it back towards the peak, and over a bit. Once we get done knocking the chimney down farther, I will not have that in the way anymore. Just got it knocked down below the roof, and the hole patched today. My roofer did a great job, and you cannot even see where the chimney came up through the front of the house on the roof. It actually was starting to leak worse through the mortar joints, especially after the Earthquake in 2008.

We finally got the new Power Vent water heater this year to replace the old Draft water heater that was 14 years old, it gave me the reason to go with a OTA finally, especially after we got Cozi-TV in our area. With the Current setup and the Channel Master 7778 pre-amp, I am getting 17.x (UHF 18 at around 49 miles away) at 92% signal, 49.x (VHF 13 at around 13 miles away) at 100%. The UHF/VHF Splitter/Combiner is hidden in the photo, due to it is on the other side of the pole.

post #15332 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOLiu View Post

I totally understand that you are all simply providing educated guesses as to what "might" work in my situation, and I appreciate all of your help in this regard

The biggest thing that my wife has emphasized is that she does not want an unsightly (i.e., large) antenna up on the roof. In checking out solidsignal.com, I came across the Wineguard and AntennaCraft line of antennas, which look much more discrete than your traditional antennas. Does anyone have any experience or opinions regarding these options?

Winegard has been a long time favorite of mine since I put the first one up in 1969. The current HD769xP series seem like decent performers. Many people are happy with AntennaCraft too. Most of the "largeness" of older TV antennas is the low VHF elements which are left off of most new designs including the HD769xP antennas so they look much smaller.

The house my parents moved to in Anaheim (close to Irvine for those not familiar with SoCal) came with an attic antenna. It did not work very well. I put them up an outdoor antenna which was a dramatic improvement.

The antenna required to receive the stations you want will be dictated by your situation. There are no magic antennas. There is no little indoor antenna that will work as well as a large outdoor antenna. You may very well be able to use an attic antenna to receive what you want but if that proves to be inadequate then you'll need an outdoor antenna. If the required antenna doesn't meet the wife acceptance factor then it's back to cable.

Chuck
post #15333 of 16114
gregzoll when I saw your picture I had to post.
I have almost the exact same setup in my attic.
I have a db4 pointing at 90% of our tv channels about 7 miles away, including the channel I am having problems with.
one old tv uses a digital converter box and shows this channel but every once in a while it will pause for a second, but not break up.
my other tv is thru a HD homerun box and into an windows media center.
Now for my question. (ABOUT DAMN TIME) smile.gif

I put in some surveillance cameras in my back yard and the cables run pretty close to the antennas. The bnc/power cables that these things run on are not the super shielded stuff I am sure of that LOL
the only problem I see if on one channel that is the most powerfull channel in our area and I get break up's on the lower part of the picture (pixilizartion blocks or about an inch sq.) happens about every 5 minutes and last for 10-30 seconds. no sound.

could these cables cause this or since its not continuous they are not?

I ask before getting new longer cables and re routing them.
I thought of putting foil around the cables but a friend said NO that will really screw up your reception.

ideas and thoughts very welcome.
Edited by etrin - 3/29/13 at 5:44am
post #15334 of 16114
I think that if they are unsheilded, or the jacket is broken, they could cause egrees & ingress issues, depending on the power due to length of run. This is why most people are starting to go with wireless cameras for long runs, due to you do not have a lightening path. I hope you have a gas discharge at each camera, and grounding to earth ground, so you do not have a ungrounded system.

Most times, people will run the camera wires through conduit, when buried in the ground, so if you ever update the system, or the cables start to degrade, you can pull them back out, while pulling the new cables through.
post #15335 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by etrin View Post

I put in some surveillance cameras in my back yard and the cables run pretty close to the antennas. The bnc/power cables that these things run on are not the super shielded stuff I am sure of that LOL
the only problem I see if on one channel that is the most powerfull channel in our area and I get break up's on the lower part of the picture (pixilizartion blocks or about an inch sq.) happens about every 5 minutes and last for 10-30 seconds. no sound.

could these cables cause this or since its not continuous they are not?

This is easy to test. Did the problem start when you installed the cameras? Does the problem go away if you power down the cameras? If not, then something else is causing the problem.

Chuck
post #15336 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOLiu View Post

The biggest thing that my wife has emphasized is that she does not want an unsightly (i.e., large) antenna up on the roof. In checking out solidsignal.com, I came across the Wineguard and AntennaCraft line of antennas, which look much more discrete than your traditional antennas. Does anyone have any experience or opinions regarding these options?

I've been using a Winegard FV-HD30 in my attic for over two years. My local stations (VHF-High and UHF) range from 15 to 37 miles and are spread about 50 degrees apart (I have the antenna aimed toward the mid-point of that spread). I get excellent signal strength on all of these stations, split to two TVs, even during rain and with snow on the roof during winter.

http://www.amazon.com/Winegard-FV-HD30-FreeVision-HDTV-Antenna/dp/B002TIELEM/ref=pd_sim_e_4

A nice thing about this type antenna is that it is very compact and would be easy to dismantle, box up, and return for refund if it doesn't work out for you.

I did find that I had to move the antenna around the attic quite a bit, while my better half checked results on the TV, until I located the "sweet spot" for best reception. I was amazed that a couple feet one way or the other made such a huge difference. I mounted the antenna, with it's provided clamp, to an old camera tripod I picked up at a Goodwill store.
post #15337 of 16114
I recently had the amplified Winegard Sensar TV Antenna (GS-2200) installed on my roof. Attached is a picture of the ground wire that was spliced in. Should I create some type of cover to protect this connection? The picture is on the outside rear wall of my home. Thanks in advance for any advise, Josea
BTW the antenna works great, I am getting 50 stations in SE Pennsylvania.


Thanks for the advise Gregzoll


vvvvvvvvvvvv
Edited by Josea - 3/31/13 at 12:30pm
post #15338 of 16114
You could. Really by the NEC, it states that it must be a ground distribution block, not that item for attachment of grounds, but hey it works, and as long as it goes to common ground for your electrical system, I personally would say that you are covered. Just make sure though that you still have a whole house surge, gas discharge block on downlead coax for the antenna, and surge strips at each tv center.

Never can be too safe, since static discharge from a lightening strike can wreck havoc on equipment.
post #15339 of 16114
Under NEC, splicing of ground wires is not permitted. The ground wire must be continuous from the grounded equipment to its termination at the permitted ground attachment point.

Yours will certainly probably work, at least until the connections oxidize and corrode, it just won't pass muster with a code official (AHJ).
post #15340 of 16114
I appreciate the well educated responses... Right now my FIOS Ont is grounded to a bracket attached to the electric meter, (that is where the spliced green wire in my recent picture terminates)... should I get an electrician in to redo the entire grounding for both? I can supply a pic if needed but it is pouring rain now mad.gif
post #15341 of 16114
They are allowed to do that, but without the installer knowing if the conduit or meter is properly grounded to earth ground, you end up creating a situation, that is nothing more than cosmetic. I would suggest finding your earth ground, run a #8 to a bonding block, that is attached inside a outside casing like they use for A/C disconnects, and then run #10 from the FiOS & Antenna, and if you have any other CATV or telephone even though they may not be currently in use at the house, still connect them to the bonding block with #10 wire to the grounding block.
post #15342 of 16114
The split bolt is an approved way to make a connection. The main grounding wire from the house electrical system to its ground rod must not be disconnected even for a moment, and the split bolt allows a grounding connection to that wire.

A grounding connection to the metal meter base can be OK, but it might not be done correctly in your case.
https://www.electricmotioncompany.com/emc.php?type=ibonding

The coax for your antenna should be connected to a grounding block. The antenna mast and the grounding block both should be connected to the house electrical ground with no. 10 copper wires. The NEC calls the grounding block an ADU----Antenna Discharge Unit.

Grounding Antenna and Dish
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1333059
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1333059/grounding-antenna-and-dish#post_20408273

The latest approved device is an Intersystem Bonding Termination:
http://www.erico.com/products/ERITECHIntersystemBondingTermination.asp

The lay-in clamp allows connection to the main grounding electrode without breaking its connection. I recently saw one being used by an electrician on PBS This Old House:
http://www.erico.com/public/library/fep/LT1476.pdf
http://www.erico.com/public/library/fep/LT19313.pdf
http://www.erico.com/public/library/Engineering/CFS380_F.pdf
Edited by rabbit73 - 3/31/13 at 10:22pm
post #15343 of 16114
Sorry to go a little off topic, but I was just wondering if this would be a good choice for whole house electrical protection (as well as coax and phone) http://www.amazon.com/Your-One-Source-SDSB1175C-Protector/dp/B002FYIHAO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1364861485&sr=8-3&keywords=whole+house+surge+protector . I have 100 AMP service and circut breakers.
Edited by Josea - 4/1/13 at 5:38pm
post #15344 of 16114
I have the older version of this http://www.amazon.com/Intermatic-IG1240RC3-Type-2-Protection-Device/dp/B003NVLWN2/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hi_1 Only difference between the two, is that the older one had three LED's (2 Green LED's (1 per leg), 1 Red for tripped breaker, or non-functioning). The one you linked is a pretty robust unit. Depending on the panel you have for your house, you may be able to find a in panel type protection, which takes the place of two breaker slots.

I chose the Intermatic at the time, due to it was available at our local Menard's, and the price could not be beat at the time (was $89, now up around $145).
post #15345 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

Under NEC, splicing of ground wires is not permitted. The ground wire must be continuous from the grounded equipment to its termination at the permitted ground attachment point.

Yours will certainly probably work, at least until the connections oxidize and corrode, it just won't pass muster with a code official (AHJ).
He is not splicing the grounds, he is using it to create a common ground block, to feed all com's (catv, antenna, telco, etc.), to his Earth ground bond for the meter pan or main panel.
post #15346 of 16114
Channel Scan with a RCA DTA800B1 using an RCA ANT751R (mounted in the attic of a one-story home in Irving), about 19 miles from Cedar Hill:

66 total channels registered = 25 Primary channels and 41 sub-channels.
Edited by See The Light - 4/7/13 at 2:46pm
post #15347 of 16114
Cutting the cord and need help.

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...1dda9ad4dbc72b

I have 3 Panasonic HD tv's. Master Bedroom 1, bedroom 2, basement rec room for entertaining 3. Do I need a converter? I was thinking of going with 2-3 Roku's. Master bedroom, we watch most of the tv shows here. Bedroom 2,-my son's bedroom, he loves watching cartoons and nba games. Basement rec room-entertaining area for guests.

I tried using an antenna like this in the past, but the reception was very spotty on a cloudy day.
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/RCA+-+Am...&skuId=8280843

I was thinking of going with this antenna.
http://www.amazon.com/Terk-Amplified...pr_product_top

or this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Paper-Thin-Lea...s=hdtv+antenna

Anything else I need to know that would help us out?
post #15348 of 16114

Hi,

 

Bad TVFool link!

 

And the rest also.

 

Or is it just me?

 

Try right click and and select "Copy shortcut", not copy.

 

SHF


Edited by SFischer1 - 4/11/13 at 8:50pm
post #15349 of 16114
Yeah, I can't get the links either. But to answer your first question, if your Panasonics were purchased in the last 4-5 years , chances are they already have a tuner built-in, so you would not need a converter.
post #15350 of 16114
Those are incomplete links and have "..." where there should be more numbers and letters. Please repost complete links.
post #15351 of 16114
post #15352 of 16114
Your situation is about as easy as it gets, strong signals not far away and all in the same direction. The only issue is you have one low VHF station on channel 5 and one high VHF station on 8. Do you care about those? If not you could get a UHF only antenna.

You don't need nor should you try any amplified antennas. Your signals are too strong for that. If you can't get an indoor antenna to work it would be because of multipath. The weather should not affect your reception with transmitters so close. If indoor is a problem then the simplest outdoor antenna should work.
post #15353 of 16114

I see the RCA comes with a 6 foot cable. If you haven't done so already, you might want to try using a longer cable in order to attempt to find a sweet spot in the room. I'd also try the RCA without the rabbit ears if possible. Location is critical for indoor reception. If you decide to go with the Leaf, this is also true. Amazon shows the Leaf with a 6 foot cable. However, if you buy from Mohu, they are now offering the Leaf without the cable attached. Mohu offers 10 and 25 foot cables that are not attached. If that extra distance would get the antenna near an east-facing window, that could make all of the difference. Good Luck.
post #15354 of 16114
I just read that Roku is partnering with Vox to offer broadcast TV. Worth waiting for?

I have Uverse now and its great, but I just can't justify paying $50/month for TV. Its crazy.
post #15355 of 16114

I have the Winegard version of that antenna. Very good antenna. It didn't pick up all my channels, but then they are not all coming from one direction and are 20 miles out. The ones off to the side weren't picked up. Yours are all LOS and ~16miles out!

This is the one that I have
http://www.amazon.com/Winegard-FlatWave-Indoor-Digital-Antenna/dp/B008WVM6FG/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1365869879&sr=1-4&keywords=winegard+antenna


When you held it up it is very sensitive to the direction. Millimeters actually matter in picture or no picture. So next to the window it had to be spot on to get anything. Actually had easier success with it laying down and it was less sensitive to how it was directed.
post #15356 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddog007 View Post

I have the Winegard version of that antenna. Very good antenna. It didn't pick up all my channels, but then they are not all coming from one direction and are 20 miles out. The ones off to the side weren't picked up. Yours are all LOS and ~16miles out!

This is the one that I have
http://www.amazon.com/Winegard-FlatWave-Indoor-Digital-Antenna/dp/B008WVM6FG/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1365869879&sr=1-4&keywords=winegard+antenna


When you held it up it is very sensitive to the direction. Millimeters actually matter in picture or no picture. So next to the window it had to be spot on to get anything. Actually had easier success with it laying down and it was less sensitive to how it was directed.

So you recommend this over the Mohu?
post #15357 of 16114
Both Mohu and Winegard have new amped versions of these flat antennas as well, which may or may not help depending upon location.
post #15358 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddog007 View Post

When you held it up it is very sensitive to the direction. Millimeters actually matter in picture or no picture. So next to the window it had to be spot on to get anything. Actually had easier success with it laying down and it was less sensitive to how it was directed.

This is because multipath is virtually impossible to avoid with an indoor antenna which is why I always recommend an outdoor antenna if at all possible. That will greatly reduce multipath issues.
post #15359 of 16114
Quote:
Originally Posted by dinosaur1 View Post

I just read that Roku is partnering with Vox to offer broadcast TV. Worth waiting for?

I have Uverse now and its great, but I just can't justify paying $50/month for TV. Its crazy.

What exactly do mean by "broadcast TV". OTA local channels ? ?
post #15360 of 16114
This is what I got up a week ago or so.

Still have a little tinkering to do with it, accessories and cables I need to install/run. In a months time I should maybe have a second UHF antenna up there pointing the opposite direction. See about getting eight more channels, two in HD.
Antenna went where our old DirectTV dish you to be.

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