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The Official AVS Antenna and Related Hardware Topic! - Page 520

post #15571 of 16070
thankx for the response.. I'm going to get the RCA flat omi direction one. $29.99 eh.

edit- just read your post ProjectSHO89. I'll see what they have and the price difference.
post #15572 of 16070
I highly recommend the Mohu Leaf antenna. http://www.gomohu.com/ I've got one for use with my laptop tuner and I get some of the South Bay stations with it here in San Francisco. Channels 14, 36 and 54 come in real well from 35 miles away. They have an amplified version, but, as Chuck suggested, don't get it for use here in the city. The Sutro stations will overpower your tuner.

Larry
post #15573 of 16070
Quote:
I highly recommend the Mohu Leaf antenna

That's pretty much who I was referring to when I said 'slick marketing". After having seen what was sandwiched between those two pieces of plastic ( a pic was posted last year), I've become convinced that they've just overwhelming the market with buzz and hype and there isn't much technical expertise in the antennas themselves. From the photo, it just appears to be a mediocre UHF antenna.
post #15574 of 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

From the photo, it just appears to be a mediocre UHF antenna.

Went to their site and did not see a single technical specification for this thing. The following probably work as good or better at a fraction of the cost (< $10.00 at Amazon).

post #15575 of 16070
A little better than the one on the right. I've got one of those that I got with a USB stick tuner a few years back. Very convenient for laptop or backpack portability, but very short range UHF only.

The one on the left at least has VHF elements, something completely lacking from the Leaf.
post #15576 of 16070
The Leaf is a little better than the one on the right. I've got one of those that I got with a USB stick tuner a few years back. Very convenient for laptop or backpack portability, but very short range and UHF only.

The one on the left at least has VHF elements, something completely lacking from the Leaf.
post #15577 of 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

The Leaf is a little better than the one on the right.

The Leaf is a little better than the one on the right.

You're starting to sound like Jimmy Two Times from Goodfellas wink.gif
post #15578 of 16070
Lol. I don't think I've ever seen that one even thought it's been around a long time.
post #15579 of 16070

Thank you everyone for the assistance in getting my antennae set-up working.  In the end I used both antennaes, the ClearStream 2V and the crappy "all channel" antennae.  The pre-amp has ports for a VHF antennae and a UHF/Combo port, so I used the combo port for the 2V and the UHF port for the other one.  In the end, I get the channels I desire on both TVs.  Props to you all.

 

-Dylan

post #15580 of 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

That's pretty much who I was referring to when I said 'slick marketing". After having seen what was sandwiched between those two pieces of plastic ( a pic was posted last year), I've become convinced that they've just overwhelming the market with buzz and hype and there isn't much technical expertise in the antennas themselves. From the photo, it just appears to be a mediocre UHF antenna.

I've got an RCA "rabbit ears" antenna with a UHF loop and I've got the Leaf. I can tell you from actual experience that the Leaf works A LOT better than the rabbit ears/loop antenna, by far. The leaf might not look like much and you might think it's all "buzz and hype", but it sure works well for me. Solid signals from 35 miles away on the other side of a hill is nothing to scoff at!

Larry
SF
post #15581 of 16070
The Mohu Leaf appears to be a basic 2-bay UHF antenna inside a thin sheet of plastic. So not necessarily mediocre, just a basic design that is overhyped and overpriced due to the thin and discreet design. Perhaps they did something revolutionary with the wiring, but that has yet to be determined. And the similar Winegard Flatwave and the Walltenna reportedly have a bit better VHF performance.
post #15582 of 16070
storytime, i guess. I have a 2008 Toshiba 32" 1080p 60Hz tv. i live in a small apartment that has a cable jack connected to the rooftop antenna. I get lots of decent channels (and tons of junk too) but it isnt some kind of cable service that was never disconnected. it is just the free stuff (abc, nbc, cbs, fox, tbs, wgn, a weather channel, discovery, MeTV, ion, CW and 3 local public broadcasting channels). I just got a 2008 40" upgrade from my mom who moved out of her house and doesnt need it. It is a 2008 Mitsubishi LT-40148 (1080p 120Hz) that looks a lot better. My tv has been used a LOT since 08 and the colors are less vibrant at the brightest settings and mom's wasnt used much at all since then. Really crisp and plays my xbox and dvds much better.

BUT the kicker is that when i run the cable into it for access to rooftop antenna absolutely no channels are found. It only scans to 69 when all of my channels I get are above that (72 and higher). I quickly tested with a paperclip and got about 6 digital channel, 2 of which were poor quality duplicates. I have since connected a longer line to the paper clip and gotten better quality reception but compared to my access from the same connection on my other tv it is really disappointing. I hardly watch the 4 main stations and watch more of my local fair (PBS and state channels) and TBS/WGN, the channels the new TV wont get. I have yet to plop down for a tv antenna in hopes of finding a solution but after checking other forums hoping someone else had a similar issue with this particular TV and getting no tech support for a longtime discontinued tv I decided to give it a go.

Some non-affiliated/non-sponsored sites have listed a few decent and cheap antennas as options and I have checked with tvloop and similar websites for what channels I can expect to get but none of them listed the channels I regularly use, particularly the local ones (for PBS programming). A radioshack $20 antenna as well as the RCA rabbit ears were reviewed best followed by the Mohu Leaf at maybe 4th or 5th best. But they all cited a fair amount of luck due to location being the real issue. My apt complex in the middle of a decent sized city (Lexington, Ky) and has no particularly tall buildings or terrain around it except for some trees directly next to my building.

Any suggestions on how to possibly connect to the rooftop before deciding on either the rabbit ears or radioshack antenna? The thread has already given some good options but based on my tv info got any other options/suggestions? Thanks!
post #15583 of 16070

My initial thoughts are that this coax outlet behind your TV is actually basic cable.  I don't believe TBS\Discovery are available over the air.  Your old TV may have just scanned for whatever channel it could get regardless of AIR vs CABLE while your new TV needs you to specify which type of signal it is.  There may even be different coax inputs for each one.  There's my $0.02

post #15584 of 16070
thanks, but one of the cool things about the Mitsubishi is it has 2 cable jacks. I have tried both Air and Cable search for both jacks on it. And I have lived in my apt complex for 10 years and have cable internet but no basic cable on my bill. and service techs have come out over the years and gotten on the pole a few times for repairs. I doubt they just let it go untouched but I guess it is possible. but if it was I would suspect my cable channel search would have resulted in some results but they never did. Our old cable provider was recently bought by Time Warner Cable (just 3 months ago) and so far nothing has changed regarding any of my connections.

edit: also, I've seen Discovery and TBS on other antenna tvs before. I'm pretty sure they are a part of it but maybe that is regional. Particularly, Discovery's free channel isnt the same programming as the one paid for through cable services. Its all rerun programming from what I watch.
post #15585 of 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabberjaw View Post

thanks, but one of the cool things about the Mitsubishi is it has 2 cable jacks. I have tried both Air and Cable search for both jacks on it. And I have lived in my apt complex for 10 years and have cable internet but no basic cable on my bill. and service techs have come out over the years and gotten on the pole a few times for repairs. I doubt they just let it go untouched but I guess it is possible. but if it was I would suspect my cable channel search would have resulted in some results but they never did. Our old cable provider was recently bought by Time Warner Cable (just 3 months ago) and so far nothing has changed regarding any of my connections.

edit: also, I've seen Discovery and TBS on other antenna tvs before. I'm pretty sure they are a part of it but maybe that is regional. Particularly, Discovery's free channel isnt the same programming as the one paid for through cable services. Its all rerun programming from what I watch.

Well then you got me.  No clue.

post #15586 of 16070
TBS is on antenna in Atlanta only. Discovery has never been free over the air with an antenna.

If you were picking them up with an antenna, that means that somewhere nearby is a defect that is allowing the signal to be radiated.
Quote:
It only scans to 69 when all of my channels I get are above that (72 and higher).

Channels above 70 are being distributed by a cable company, meant for a sealed distribution system.
post #15587 of 16070
If your scan stops at ch 69, you are scanning for OTA (antenna) channels. TVs made in the 80s or earlier could pick up OTA UHF up to channel 83, but tvs made since then only scan to the highest UHF OTA channel available, which was 69. Now the highest UHF OTA channel is 51. If your 2008 Toshiba is picking up channels 72 or higher, you are finding these by doing a scan for cable channels. So I think you need to find out which input to use on the Mit and scan for cable channels.
post #15588 of 16070
Hi,

Looking to pick out a good antenna for OTA. The most important stations I need to get are WCIU, WPWR, Fox, and NBC. My tvfool report is:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae6692df8ece

My house has aluminum siding and a shingle roof. My viewing location is the basement, but I can place the antenna on the main level, second level, or attic easily enough. I'd prefer not to do an outdoor install.

I tried a RCA ANT1050, and it hasn't worked great. If I place it on the first floor, I can get some stations intermittently, but not all and not enough of the time.

I'd appreciate any suggestions you can give. I'm considering an ANT751 placed in the attic.
post #15589 of 16070
Ghostee:

Since you have two VHF-low stations in your market (WOCK-4 and WKQX-6), you'd need an antenna designed to also receive VHF-low (real channels 2-6), in addition to VHF-high (channels 7-13) and UHF (channels 14-51). At only 18 miles distance and with your strong signal strengths, I'd try the Antennacraft AC9 and mount it as high as possible in your attic (within an inch of touching the rafters) and aimed toward 94 degrees true. Keep in mind that the wide 98" rear element is required to receive VHF-low, such that your attic should be able to handle that width (even if it ends up being fairly low in your attic, that's probably okay). If you are careful about unfolding the antenna and with the packaging, you could return it if performance were not satisfactory, but I'd be surprised if it didn't work well for you, especially if the aimed direction does not aim right into any aluminum siding on your attic ends, but instead aims through plywood/shingles.

http://www.amazon.com/AntennaCraft-12-Element-HDTV-VHF-Antenna/dp/B007Z7L6F4
http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?mc=03&p=AC9
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11113388

Hope this is helpful - good luck...
post #15590 of 16070
WKQX is a "Franken FM" station. WOCK "might" be of interest.

Usually a small 7-51 antenna like a C2V, HBU22, 7694p, or an ANT751R is what most people would get unless you want to include the low-V station(s) mentioned. You'll have to get whatever antenna you pick above the aluminum siding.
post #15591 of 16070
jabberjaw,
As others have said it appears you're pulling in basic cable.
There is something called clear QAM, I thought it no longer existed but maybe in your area it still does.
Alot of cable compnay's used to have clear QAM for basic.
Apartment complex's would pipe the clear QAM signal to each apartment thus elimenating the need for an antenna on the roof.
So I would say your old TV had a QAM tuner and your new one doesn't.
Try looking in the new TV's manual for QAM tuning, it can't hurt to look.

This is why you actually received stations with a paper clip and nothing when hooked into the wall outlet.
Because the outlet is not actually hooked up to an antenna.
Edited by The Hound - 10/13/13 at 8:04pm
post #15592 of 16070

Since you all did such an amazing job helping me with my antennae situation, I hope you can do the same for a friend of mine.  He was over this weekend and was impressed by the video quality I was getting from my antennae set-up and he wants to cut his cable too.  His problem is that he lives quite a long ways away from the major broadcast antennae in LA.  Here's his TVFool report.

 

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46aebc45a3490c

 

Any suggestions on which hardware to buy, how to mount it and any other tricks of the trade?  He's almost 95 miles from the major broadcast so it's going to be tough.

post #15593 of 16070
Hi Everyone!
I'm hoping to get some advice about choosing an antenna. I am attaching this to my roof, over 30 feet above the ground with no significant trees or hills nearby. I'm interested in mostly the major US channels, ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, etc. My tvfool report is here:
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae7fae39776a
It seems that I should be covered with a decent UHF antenna, if I am reading the channels/signals properly.

I've tried wading through several threads for recommendations and these are a few that kept popping up:
Antennas Direct 91XG Uni-Directional Antenna $63
Winegard HD7694P $64
Winegard HD7698P $124
Winegard HD8200U $123

I'm leaning towards the 91XG since it has favorable reviews, appears to suit my needs and is the cheapest of the options I found so far. But because I can install on the roof, size is not an issue and I'm thinking I should just go for the biggest possible one like the 8200U (everyone says bigger, taller, etc is better). I'd like to do it once correctly rather than find out I should have gone bigger later. So I'm open to any comments, what would you do in my shoes? Which antenna should I get? and please feel free to suggest another antenna you like. Thanks for your help.
post #15594 of 16070
A Winegard 7694, Antenna Craft HBU22, RCA ANT751R, or an Antennas Direct C2V should all work for your local stations. You don't need any of those big guys, you're only 6 miles from the local broadcast towers on Sutro and San Bruno.

You have your ABC and NBC stations on VHF.
post #15595 of 16070
CatsDogs... You have the same situation that I have here, except that I'm on the other side of Twin Peaks. You have Sutro and Mt. Diablo to the east (104 degrees) but Mt. San Bruno is off to the south at 152º. The 91XG has too much of a limited pick up area to work here. It's great for picking up stations from a distance, but it has to be pointed right at the stations. It won't work well for picking up BOTh Sutro and Mt. San Bruno stations without use of a rotor.

What you need is something with a more general coverage area. I use the Channel Master 4228 for UHF and a Antennas Direct C5 for VHF. Pointing the antennas between Sutro and Mt. San Bruno gives me good reception of all the channels. For you, it will also help receive the stations that transmit from the hills above Fremont (1, 14, 36, 48 and 54).

The Winegard HD7694P would be another good choice since it covers both VHF (7 and 11) and UHF (all the other stations).

Once you get the antenna up you'll need to find that sweet spot for positioning the antenna to get the best reception of all stations. Something around 120º should be about right.

You can take a look at http://www.larrykenney.com/tvantennas.html to see my antennas along with a list of the stations received.

Good luck!

Larry
SF
post #15596 of 16070

Anyone have a recommendation for my post above?  Anyone?  Bueller?  Bueller?

post #15597 of 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorddylan View Post

Anyone have a recommendation for my post above?


95 miles to LA and not clear line of site. Chances are slim and none, and I'm betting on none. He might start by seeing if any of his neighbors are using rooftop antennas and if so, asking them if they get any Los Angeles recepption.
Edited by AntAltMike - 11/29/13 at 7:58pm
post #15598 of 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorddylan View Post

Anyone have a recommendation for my post above?  Anyone?  Bueller?  Bueller?

I offered some advice under the Santa Barbara locals thread several years ago. As I recall and from looking at the above TV Fool chart, only the VHF from LA is worth a try and that takes major effort. It would be better to concentrate on the nearby transmitters which take some work themselves due to being both UHF and VHF as well as different directions. For a list of what is available in the Santa Barbara area visit rabbitears.info
post #15599 of 16070
Antenna1.jpg 109k .jpg file

Here is my TV Fool: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae2cec647d7e

I have good luck with LA Stations using the antenna system shown mounted on the peak of our two story house. Using about 100 feet of coax with a preamp.

I can usually get all the LA/Riverside public TV stations: KCET, KOCE, KLCS, KPBS, KVCR. KCBS, KNBC and KTTV come in most of the time also.

The top UHF is a Winegard 9095P. It was put up first, before I needed a VHF antenna. The lower VHF is a Winegard YA1713 modified for rear mounting. The preamp is a Winegard AP-8275. The rotator is a Yaesu big unit that was used for rotating a large ham antenna previously installed there. I should mention that the preamp has inputs for both the VHF and UHF antennas.

FYI.
Edited by Ennui - 10/23/13 at 9:17am
post #15600 of 16070
Sorry for not replying sooner but I just wanted to thank both ProjectSHO89 and Larry Kenney for taking the time to read and reply to my post. I had read that bigger=better but from reading the tvfool and antennaweb reports for my location it seemed that a smaller antenna would work. I guess I just needed some experts to tell me it was ok and the Antenna Craft HBU22 sounds like a winner. I'll put in the order today! I'll update and edit this post when I get everything all setup. Thanks again for your help and suggestions.

For reference I decided to buy the Antenna Craft HBU22 from

$33.57 shipped from SignalSignal via Amazon

RadioShack $37.99 with free shipping. It was slightly more expensive at RadioShack but if there's a problem with missing parts or anything I'm assuming I could do an exchange/refund at my local store. I don't think I'll need this though and went with saving the $4
Edited by CatsDogs - 10/23/13 at 10:03am
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