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Bass Shakers - Page 33

post #961 of 1151
They can be mounted vertically under a car seat and yes they work mounted horizontally but they also wear out quicker that way and it is not recommended. But like so many things you can do it. and yes they are cheap so I guess you don't care if they konk out sooner.
post #962 of 1151
OK.. I'll take your word for it and expect to spend $120 replacing my shakers a little sooner. Thanks for the heads up.
post #963 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by reaper View Post

OK.. I'll take your word for it and expect to spend $120 replacing my shakers a little sooner. Thanks for the heads up.

unless the internal construction has changed I can't think of anything that would wear differently depending on the orientation of the shaker as it is mounted. There is a fairly stiff plastic "spider" that holds the voicecoil assembly. It won't care horiz vs. vert mounting.

So... you can save for when the shakers need replacing, but odds are they fail far more frequently from too much power (and inadequate cooling) than anything else when used in a car to replace/supplement a subwoofer and fed bass heavy music for hours at a time.

You will probably never need to replace them in normal home theater use as they are hardly stressed at all by movies. (even with the worst special effects the duty cycle time is brief).
post #964 of 1151
I build an isolator system for my couch to prevent vibration from getting into the apartment building structure. I snapped a few pics for you guys showing what I did...

I took some scrap MDF and cut two pieces to the same size as my couch feet. I cut up some aluminum angle iron into 6" pieces and screwed it on to each side of isolator foot to hold the MDF square on the couch foot. I drilled a 3/8" hole in each side of the isolator foot to mount the metal plug. I used fender washers to prevent the mdf from blowing out, and lock washer to keep the bolt from backing out. The isolator plug fits in the rubber piece, and the rubber piece fits in the polyethylene shoe.









While I was painting I had some music playing at moderate levels. Without the isolators on there the entire room shakes, and the deck outside shakes. If I turn it up the lights in the room begin to vibrate. Once the couch is suspended up on these rubber mounts the vibration felt in the room is almost non-existant. You can sit on the floor right next to the couch and not realize that the shakers are on. If you put your hand on the couch, the thing is ROCKIN! Not bad... cost me 30 bucks for the isolators, about 10 in hardware and aluminum, and .99 in paint I also picked up a small skillsaw circular handsaw for 30 bucks on sale. I love power tools!

isolators were sourced on e- bay auction 140116111572 - but are also available on amazon for just under 50 bucks for 4- search for "KNC Homeshop HSCB-125/4"


Keep in mind these are virtually the same thing clark synthesis sells as their top of the line isolator for $60 EACH!!! (down to the "kinetics" wording on the rubber). The only thing that is missing is a stupid piece of angle iron with two holes drilled in it.
post #965 of 1151
Hey guys.. I just got my two coaster chairs, and ordered by bass shakers from PExpress. I still need an amp to wire these in serial.... Can someone recommend the best bang for the buck for an amp?
Tnx,
Tex
post #966 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirsloop View Post

I build an isolator system for my couch to prevent vibration from getting into the apartment building structure. I snapped a few pics for you guys showing what I did...

I took some scrap MDF and cut two pieces to the same size as my couch feet. I cut up some aluminum angle iron into 6" pieces and screwed it on to each side of isolator foot to hold the MDF square on the couch foot. I drilled a 3/8" hole in each side of the isolator foot to mount the metal plug. I used fender washers to prevent the mdf from blowing out, and lock washer to keep the bolt from backing out. The isolator plug fits in the rubber piece, and the rubber piece fits in the polyethylene shoe.









While I was painting I had some music playing at moderate levels. Without the isolators on there the entire room shakes, and the deck outside shakes. If I turn it up the lights in the room begin to vibrate. Once the couch is suspended up on these rubber mounts the vibration felt in the room is almost non-existant. You can sit on the floor right next to the couch and not realize that the shakers are on. If you put your hand on the couch, the thing is ROCKIN! Not bad... cost me 30 bucks for the isolators, about 10 in hardware and aluminum, and .99 in paint I also picked up a small skillsaw circular handsaw for 30 bucks on sale. I love power tools!

isolators were sourced on e- bay auction 140116111572 - but are also available on amazon for just under 50 bucks for 4- search for "KNC Homeshop HSCB-125/4"


Keep in mind these are virtually the same thing clark synthesis sells as their top of the line isolator for $60 EACH!!! (down to the "kinetics" wording on the rubber). The only thing that is missing is a stupid piece of angle iron with two holes drilled in it.

this is EXACTLY what i've been looking for. thanks for posting this. Do you have a picture of your couch with these installed?
post #967 of 1151
look it up

I just got 2 and gonna power them from a KLH plate amp 100w. Could somebody show me how to wire these 2 speakers to one lead on the amp? I'm not real familiar on parallel/series wiring. Thanks for any help

Jason
post #968 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_sand View Post

look it up

I just got 2 and gonna power them from a KLH plate amp 100w. Could somebody show me how to wire these 2 speakers to one lead on the amp? I'm not real familiar on parallel/series wiring. Thanks for any help

Jason

You would want them wired parallel. Basically connect all +'s together and all -'s together. Series is more or less like batteries in a flashlight, + to -. HTH

Travis
post #969 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by bass addict View Post

You would want them wired parallel. Basically connect all +'s together and all -'s together. Series is more or less like batteries in a flashlight, + to -. HTH

Travis

I think that is bad advice. Since the shakers are a 4 ohm load putting them in parallel will result in a 2 ohm load to the amplifier.

If your amplifier can handle a 2 ohm load, you will be fine.

If your amplifier is not rated for a 2 ohm load it will either:
  • overheat and shut down if it has overheat protection
  • shut itself down if it has overcurrent (short circuit) protection
  • self destruct quietly if it does not have overheat or overcurrent protection
  • self destruct in a dramatic way (smoke and/or flames) if it does not have overheat or overcurrent protection
  • work until you have guests over and turn up the volume a bit more than normal, then... overheat or self-destruct.

Since I know of no plate amplifier that is ok with a 2 ohm load, I would strongly suggest connecting the two shakers in series. It will be an 8 ohm load and safe for any amplifier.

Joe L.
post #970 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_sand View Post

look it up

I just got 2 and gonna power them from a KLH plate amp 100w. Could somebody show me how to wire these 2 speakers to one lead on the amp? I'm not real familiar on parallel/series wiring. Thanks for any help

Jason

Ok so I have been debating these for a while now. Question though, well a few actually. First, did you get those shakes for 25 each, if so can you PLEASE PM me. Also I have an old 5.1 reciever that I started out with in college before this became an addiction. Could I use that to power 2 shakers? If not whats a nice, but cost effective amp (still in college so money is tight). Thanks for all the help!
post #971 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. L. View Post

I think that is bad advice. Since the shakers are a 4 ohm load putting them in parallel will result in a 2 ohm load to the amplifier.

If your amplifier can handle a 2 ohm load, you will be fine.

Thanks for the clarification. I was assuming the amp could handle a 2 ohm load. There are amps that will, I have used some in the past. Keep in mind the buttkickers can handle a ton of power, and through different setups I have found they operate more efficiently running at a higher wattage.
post #972 of 1151
After reading all these posts and 3 days later I can now say I am a little closer to knowing how I am going to do my setup
post #973 of 1151
Now if I can adjust my output level to the 2nd receiver down to 40-50 hz would I still benefit by adding an fmod? Or would my primary receiver take care of all that?

Thanks
post #974 of 1151
quick question all... after I finished the setup... whenever everything is connected there is an anoyying hum...buzz from each sub. I am not experianced with this, and might have messed something up. I ran the speaker wire from the bass shakers parallel to all of them... is this right? Also do I have to use two audio jack to the amp or just the one subwoofer cable... I have the dayton 240watt amp from parts express.

Thanks!
post #975 of 1151
sounds like you have a ground loop. Try plugging in the amp into another outlet on a different circuit to see if the problem goes away.

Could also be some cables too close to each other behind your receiver.
post #976 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeko View Post

. I ran the speaker wire from the bass shakers parallel to all of them... is this right? Thanks!

If you have two or more bass-shakers connected, all in parallel, to that amplifier, it is wrong.

That amplifier is rated for a 4 ohm load. A single bass-shaker is a 4 ohm load.
Two in parallel would be a 2 ohm load. 4 in parallel would be a 1 ohm load.

Both will eventually cause one of the following to occur:

The amplifier will overheat and shut down.

The amplifier will draw more current than it is designed for and blow a fuse

The amplifier will self destruct.

There are drawings in this thread for many different configurations of shakers. Choose one that is between 4 and 16 ohms load and you will be fine.

The hum is caused by a ground loop. Do a search and you will find solutions.

Joe L.
post #977 of 1151
Thanks for the replies! I changed my wiring pattern to series vs parallel... still the hum..so I need to go try a different outlet and make sure my cables are too close.. (fingures crossed) thanks again.. i'll check back in, in a bit!
post #978 of 1151
ok... just tested on three different outlets... still getting the hum. The only time it stops is when I unplug the a/v cables out from the dayton sub amp. Or the opposite end from the y splitter to the powered sub.

I tried using a mono sub connector, as well as splitting to the a/v cable red and white, still if it was connected from the powered sub to the sub amp, i'd get a hum.

Any other suggestions on what I should try? If you need additional info I can get it to ya.

Thanks!

Luke
post #979 of 1151
where the 3 outlets on a different circuit? 3 outlets in the same room may be on the same circuit (I.e. breaker in your breaker box).

There are 3rd party devices that can eliminate it.
post #980 of 1151
one was in the same room... living room, other was in an adjacent bedroom. I have been reading about a loop isolator, and a cheater plug, to eliminate the use of the ground pin. You think I should try those?
post #981 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeko View Post

one was in the same room... living room, other was in an adjacent bedroom. I have been reading about a loop isolator, and a cheater plug, to eliminate the use of the ground pin. You think I should try those?

A cheater plug would confirm if it is a ground loop. If you use one you lose the safety it provided in case of an electrical malfunction or short in the shaker amplifier.

To get back some of the safety, use one of these in combination with the cheater plug. You can get one at your local big-box hardware store.
http://www.trci.net/products/shock_s...f/14650wht.pdf

Plug the GFCI into a grounded outlet, the cheater plug into it, and the amplifier into the cheater plug. Now, any flow of current through your body should trip the GFCI and save you from possible electrocution.

The other possible solution would be a ground loop isolation transformer. These are made for audio use and available from radio-shack and other places...
http://www.radioshack.com/sm-buy-the...i-2062214.html
I've not tested the RadioShack isolator, it is made for car audio, where ground loops are comon, but I have no idea of how low its low frequency response goes. Odds are good it will work fine in series with the shaker amplifier.

Joe L.
post #982 of 1151
Can someone post a diagram of wiring 6 shakers to a stereo amp with 3 on each channel? I want to make sure I have it right.
post #983 of 1151
J.L. Thank you much for the information... I'll test some of these ways out and see what works best. I think i'll give the isolater a shot first then if that doesnt work go the other route... also thanks for the additional safety measure tips!

I'll let you know what works out!

Luke
post #984 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karman View Post

Can someone post a diagram of wiring 6 shakers to a stereo amp with 3 on each channel? I want to make sure I have it right.

There is only one way to get them to all shake evenly and be a good load for the stereo receiver... three in series on each channel.

It will be a 12 ohm load, so you will get about 2/3rds the power you would available at 8 ohms.

Joe L.
post #985 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. L. View Post

There is only one way to get them to all shake evenly and be a good load for the stereo receiver... three in series on each channel.

Is there a basic wiring diagram that illustrates the series wiring online somewhere?
post #986 of 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karman View Post

Is there a basic wiring diagram that illustrates the series wiring online somewhere?

Each set of three should be wired like this:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/attac...7&d=1096674709
The big rectangle on top is one channel of your receiver.

Joe L.
post #987 of 1151
Thanks again for all your help... the ground loop isolator worked! Wow... these bass shakers are a lot of fun...

Now i'm off to research correct speaker calibration techniques!

Thanks again!
post #988 of 1151
Thanks Joe L. - that's how I thought it should go.

Next question - is MDF the best "wood" to use for mounting the shakers? Would a hardwood work better?
post #989 of 1151
You can also use one of the low cost subwoofer amps (designed with a mounting plate for attaching to the back of DIY subwoofer cabinet but can be used free-standing). Parts Express also sells these in various watt output ratings.
post #990 of 1151
will I get any response out of the shakers if I run just 1 coax to the left or right input from the y adapter on my preout to the old reciever im using to power the shakers?
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