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Pioneer Elite Pro-510 problem - Page 75

post #2221 of 2919
@johnla
can you comment on getting pc VGA output to RGB/HV using NVIDIA or ATI in their current generation?
post #2222 of 2919
As per Pioneer

http://208.220.235.52:7001/eSupportJ...tion_id=F12078



"PRO610HD, PRO510HD: RGB Connection
Hooking up a personal computer to RGB terminal

The RGB input jack is designed for use in connecting a digital tuner with RGB signal output
It should never be used for connecting to personal computer or other device."


http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PU.../Knowledgebase
post #2223 of 2919
I don't understand. I am confused by your use of quotation. Is that Rhetorical?

Do you mean to say that it is not supported by Pioneer, or definitively; that no use of powerstrip, HDFURY or other means will allow anything other than a "digital tuner" to connect and provide desirable viewing signal? And thus, specifically, that a PC connected via HDfury or with appropriate ??????? (i dunno WTF I am asking here, if I knew I wouldn't be asking) martian, reverse-amplified, over-thrusted oxygen boosted flux capacitor signal cable wont output just great?

I get the feeling that no matter wtf Pioneer says, many people have had success delivering a 1080i correctly synced cable to the pioneer and I want to know how and if its cheaper via component, or DVI or hdmiwith an HDFury or something else......

But thx.....anyway I already read all that in the manual.
post #2224 of 2919
That is what Pioneer says, and if you want to do anything else with the RGB input, then Pioneer is kind of telling you are on your own. And for how cut and dried they worded it, that pretty much means Pioneer officially does not support the use of a computer. And yes, the HDFury works on them, but no matter what you use, external tuners, satellite TV, cable TV, HDFury, DVD players, video game systems, or a computer. You can only send the TV itself the types of signals that the TV natively can accept, which is 480i, 480p, or 1080i. Whatever type of device you use to feed a signal to the TV, it must output in at least one of those formats in order to show a picture.

Now if you want to know what to try a set a HTPC video card to output at in HD, in order to feed the sets RGB input jack. The spec is, 1080i 33.75 kHz 60Hz, and it's the same spec if you want to use a component input for 1080i.

These are not like old CRT multisync analog CRT computer monitors, which often times could take a wide variation of input signals and show a great picture. If you try and feed this TV with something other than one of it's very limited range of native input rates, it will not know what to do with them and it will not give you a viewable picture.
post #2225 of 2919
My latest-ever-gen 73" Mit does exactly the same thing. Nada on 720p.

This is regardless of which input or input format is used. It's all in the decoding process, well beyond the input selector. Just was not designed to do anything with 720p, leaves it absolutely blank.


b
post #2226 of 2919
I'll let you know what I find. It's going to take a while though. The set is in Fla. and I live in Va. so I can only work on the set when I get down there.

I checked the ICs for shorts/whisker and didn't find anything. I'm going to try and replace the ICs first and see what happens.

I didn't see a light on the deflection board, just on the power supply board and board with the ICs

Thanks for all the help.
Ken T
post #2227 of 2919
Make sure all 4 fuses are a go. If one is blown, the LED on the conv bd could still light up and the set still not work.

Had that happen recently and replacing the blown fuse cured it. Works fine now.

b
post #2228 of 2919
That was the first thing I looked at. I even replaced them to make sure. I'm hoping to get back down there in April or May.

Ken T
post #2229 of 2919
My story is a little different than most on here. I was tolling my local freecycle page and someone was giving away a 510. I looked it up...found this forum. Asked the guy about it's history and why he wanted to get rid of it. Well, typical PS problem. He bought an LCD to replace it after 6 months. So I took a chance, picked it up... it was working when I got there. He wwas running it at 1080i via RGB from his DirectTV. Picture was a little dark and fuzzy.

Took it home, turned it on...still working. Last night... took it all apart. Label says 2001 on it, so this must have been near the end of the run. Took out the PS, found a bunch of cold solder joints...resoldered the entire board. Put it in...worked! Noticed the convergence appeared much better...was surprised by that. Recalibrated, dusted off the lenses, cleaned the screens.

Sat down to watch a movie. Wow...this is a great TV...Especially for free. The guy told me I saved it from the local recycle. That wouldn't have happened if I didn't find this forum. Thanks guys...especially Bob. I am tickled with my new toy.

Joe
post #2230 of 2919
Great, another one lives on!
post #2231 of 2919
Great that you could save another one! Yeah, the conv regulators that provide the voltage rails to the conv sys were probably getting their conn's really hinky in there, and are solid again now.

Next order of biz is to clean the optics, and that means all 10 surfaces that will need cleaning by now, of the 28 total optical surfaces in there (9 per gun plus the mirror, of which only 3 per gun need cleaning). Believe me, you'll be amazed all over again, check out my website for why...



b
post #2232 of 2919
Same prob. here as most everyone else. Has been going on for 3 or 4 years now. CRAP! I should have looked around for a solution on the web a LONG time ago! Anyway, I'm just trying to get a updated, condenced fix on my prob. I believe I need to remove my power supply & re-solder it? Is that correct? I'm pretty handy but soldering circut boards is not on my resume so I will just take it out & bring it to a local elec. geek I guess. Still not sure where board is or how to access it... any pics or general assistance would be greatly appreciated! THX!!! Also, Mr. Bob, I've been curious about cleaning the optics as the unit is 10 yrs. old and I'm SURE they are dirty... 2 dogs in the house... again, thx in advance for any help!
post #2233 of 2919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitie View Post

I believe I need to remove my power supply & re-solder it? Is that correct? I'm pretty handy but soldering circut boards is not on my resume so I will just take it out & bring it to a local elec. geek I guess. Still not sure where board is or how to access it... any pics or general assistance would be greatly appreciated! THX!!!

Links to some pictures are in this post.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showp...postcount=2167


Yes, the blue flash is the classic result/symptom of poor/failing solder connections. However, make sure whoever solders the board is good and is also experienced at soldering printed circuit boards, if he is not, get someone else to do the board, these boards are really NOT the place to try and learn how to solder printed circuit boards! And make sure that he also re-solders each and every solder joint on the board!
post #2234 of 2919
You've been playing with fire for 3 or 4 years here. You are extremely lucky you have not caused damage downline because of this. Eventually enough conn's go bad that the one that causes a giant spike - a lightning bolt, essentially - to go down into the rest of your set happens, and then it starts getting really expensive, many times totalling the unit. If it still turns on properly from dead cold as we speak and shows the regular coherent picture, keep it cold - on for no longer than 40 seconds - unplug it, and get it fixed.

Whatever you do, do not allow it back up to normal operating temperature again - even once - until restored to 100% efficacy. Completely fixed. Not just partially, but completely.

And no you don't have to do every joint on the board. Just 99% of them. Anything less and you're playing Russian Roulette with it again.

And no, don't just use a local tech. Most local techs will resolder the joints now needing attention and call it good. This will fix your set for now. Your set will work perfectly for the time of their warranty period and the tech will be allowed to keep his money, but sooner or later the rest of the joints on that board will start to go bad and you'll be right back where you started. I and one other tech I know do it right - solder everything in there that truly needs it, which is 99% of the conn's in there, with only very specific and highly limited exceptions. Hundreds of them, many of them very very small, where an unintentional solder bridge is very easy to do. Don't even think about trying it yourself if you are not a professional in the field, doing soldering every day as either a repair tech or a circuit board assembler working in a plant, like I did at Tektronix years ago. Way too much is riding on it.

I am available if you want to send it my way, contact me off board please, not by pm. I am readily accessible by Googling Mr Bob or checking out my website.


Advice and live, on the phone coaching on optics cleaning is also available, from my over 20 years of experience at that and all things related to calibration. Thanks for asking -


b
post #2235 of 2919
i have an 8 year RPTV and about a year ago it started doing sudden intensity jumps to a darker level, I tried turning off the RLS feature but saw not difference. It quit doing it recently, but the intensity of the set is lower than in the past. Is this pointing to a PS issue or does it just needs cleaned (never has) or both. I have been loking for instruciotns on how to clean the guns (i understand you have to go thru the front screen) Does anyone have a manual or recommend where to get one for this purpose.
post #2236 of 2919
Both. Probably. As a x20 series we really don't know yet.

Your set may be from the first half of that model year or the second. The first half used the same defectively soldered board as the year before, the one this thread is all about. Or it could be from the second half of that model year, where they used a completely different, redesigned PS board, where cold solder joints were never a problem.

If your PS board - the one at the end of your power cord from the wall power outlet - is vertically mounted, we can help you here. If it's floor mounted it's from the second half of that model year, and you'll probably need local service repair help.

In either case part of the dimness you're seeing on your images is due to your optics definitely needing a thorough and professional grade cleaning, which I am glad to coach you on over the phone. The static charge built up in your set due to the 30 KV used in its operation definitely does a number on your optics. They literally suck all the airborn particulates in the air down onto them - or up against, in the case of the mirror - every minute the set is on. This keeps the air extremely clean, and your optics extremely dirty. Go to my website for more on this.

Don't take doing that op lightly, your set's optics are very fragile and extremely scratchable, which is permanent. I am not talking big scratches here, I am talking small ones. Thousands of them. If you do things wrong, they form a "scuff", which is thousands of tiny scratches at a time, and this is worse than one big scratch, tho not by much. Neither is good. So be extremely careful when doing your optics cleaning, you only get one shot at it each time you do it, and what you get is what you get. Permanently.

And - almost needless to say - they are irreplaceable. Not much is left to buy from Pioneer anymore, and lenses have never been easy to get ahold of if damaged as it is.

If you want to do it from my 20 plus years of experience in such things, contact me directly, no pms please. There is a lot of bad info out there on optics cleaning of plastic lenses and front surface mirrors, some of it erroneously attributed to Mr Bob. I cringe every time I see the words, "Mr Bob says to use microfibre towels", and other such tripe. Please don't believe everything you see out there. Much of it is bunk, and for info you want from me, it's best to get it from the horse's mouth...

Mine!



Let us know about that vertically vs. floor mounted thing, on the PS board -

b
post #2237 of 2919
I have the 710 now that I'm trying to do some trouble shooting on. I want to pick up another set that I could use to test some of the boards on, like the power board. I would keep the original boards with the original set.

I have found a couple of sets on Craigs List for cheap but I don't know if I can use them for what I want. The sets are a Elite Pro 700 HD and a Elite Pro 75. Are the boards from the 710 interchangeable with either if theses?

Thanks for the help.
post #2238 of 2919
Not that I know of. All boards in the 510/610/710 series are interchangeable with each other, other than that I have no idea. I know the info about the PS board above makes those in the x20 series affected by that info have the same power board, and I would suspect all the other boards in those 2 series are the same.

But DK what happened in the final half of the x20 model year. I know the PS board was changed, DK what else.

I'd avoid the 700 like the plague, tho. Its convergence sys is guaranteed to make your brain blow up - or melt down, probably both - after about 5 hours of dicking with it...




b
post #2239 of 2919
Thanks Bob, that's what I was afraid of. I just keep looking until I find what I need,it's just a matter of time.
post #2240 of 2919
Too bad you don't live around here. Out in the garage I have a fully functional 610, and in the sun room a fully functional Panny 65", both CRTs.

b
post #2241 of 2919
I finally got my Flashing Screen straightened out. A guy named Bill Covert in Monroe Michigan that works at a Durochers Appliance/Service Center resoldered the power board for $65.00. Now the Pioneer SD582HD5 looks good again with no blue/white flashing. I went there armed with the info I got here and told him what it was doing and what people discovered as being the problem. He was the only person out of all but one service techs I talked to that was even interested in looking at it. The other one was Mr. Bob

Bill said he would let people send in their boards if they wanted and he would resolder them. So if anyone in here is from the Michigan area or surrounding states, keep him in mind.

Mr. Bob Thank You for your help as well. Your input was Priceless!!!
post #2242 of 2919
Just hope he listened to us here on this thread and didn't take the path of least resistance. It's easy to make the set work again, properly but not necessarily reliably, which can only be proven out over time.

The challenge is to make it stay that way. Permanently. Like all the other perfectly efficacious boards in there, that never fail even many years down the line. Like all good electronics.

If it/he took one minute less than 2 full hours on the resoldering process, plus one minute less than a minimum of another half hour on the inspection process - which takes a major amount of time as well, at least 1/4 of the time taken soldering - I would still be suspicious as to whether it will last for you. If he only did the joints that are bad now, as most local repair techs do, be ready for a whole new crop of them to go bad soon, with the expansion and contraction of the heat and cold on all those hinky joints continuing, at least 45 minutes per off/on cycle at least once per day, average.

If he did only enough to make it work OK now and didn't do the necessary amount of overkill it, the next time it goes down it could go down hard, from a joint going down early, that would not have gone bad at all if all the required ones needing it - even tho they didn't look like they need it now - had been done first time around. Not doing all those joints affected now and in the future could very well take your set down permanently, or make it go over the price of what you want to pay to get it going again.

This of course does not happen when I do things, as I apply the necessary overkill, every time. I don't play Russian Roulette with anybody's boards.

Without enough of the joints being resoldered, even if it has been made to work successfully now, you're much more likely to have a catastrophic event that will take your set down hard, than you will if it's still in the beginning stages. That's because a lot of intermediate joints that woulda taken longer to go, will now be exposed and thus susceptible to damaging your set now, a lot sooner than they would have otherwise. Doing a partial job of the resoldering takes out a lot of very effective decoys, leaving a lot of the really important joints exposed - and much more damaging when they go than the earlier ones are.

If he truly did all that needed to be done to restore your board completely, my hat's off to him. Len over at Home Theater Shack does this I am sure, and I am confident of others who read what I say here and know it to be true also, and practice what I preach.

For the rest, I hope you enjoy Russian Roulette!



b
post #2243 of 2919
Mr Bob,

Got to the 620 this weekend and pulled the back cover. Power supply is vertically mounted on the right side of the set. Guess this means it can have the same bad solder joints as the x10 series Elites. What are the specifics on what I would be seeing if the solder joints were going bad? Also was able to look up and see the color guns. I was suprised to see very litlle dust on the top lenses. I see more dust on my tube TV's after 2 weeks.
post #2244 of 2919
You have to know how to look for the dust. Believe me after 10 years of regular operation under HV statically charged conditions, it's there.

Shine a very strong flashlight at a steep angle from the side, at each lens. That will show you. Lick your finger and draw a happy face in one of them if you don't believe me. Just don't do this dry! Lick your finger first.

Being vertically mounted to the bulkhead of the unit, your model is definitely one of the earlier ones, that still used the PS board from the x10 series. Send it to me and I'll take care of it for you.

The tests are what it does once warmed up. If the intermittent conns and the brightness fluctuations only happen after warm up, that's all you need to know. Shut your set down and unplug it before it gets worse.

Do not allow it to warm up to operating/cruising temp - for any space of time longer than 40 seconds after turn-on - even once until fixed completely and permanently. Doing so is playing Russian Roulette with it. Don't know about you, but I don't do such things with instruments - or their potential replacements - costing thousands and thousands of dollars.


b
post #2245 of 2919
At the suggestion of Mr. Bob, I thought I would add this to this thread, in addition to some other avenues.

Quite some time back I came into possesion of a Pioneer Elite Pro710-HD. After some time it came into some problems (from my e-mail to Bob):

"Anyhow, as the subject suggests, I came by a used Pioneer Elite PRO710-HD 64" unit. Since I bought it some 6 months ago, it has developed a number of problems. Initially, the blue projector would start to go very bright, flash a few times and then go 'POP' back to normal display. Occasionally the unit would stop functioning until it was turned off for a half hour or so and allowed to cool down (presumably). Finally, the spin cycle of our washing machine killed it - that is to say, our washing machine started shaking to house while the TV was on and suddenly the image got wavy and something in the TV started to audibly whine."

I ran through some quick tests at Bob's suggestion, and confirmed that the unit operates correctly and that the issue should only occur at full temperature, indicating, in his opinion, that the set needs a traditional full resolder of the PS board.

I have kept the set for quite some time in the hopes that I'd be able to set aside enough savings to afford the repair and even a calibration of the TV. However, I have since quit my job in order to focus more fully on school work. Now, I've been informed that I will need to be moving out of my house by the end of July.

For that reason, I'd like to offer up my set for free. Being what it is, and knowing that it is repairable for somebody with a little more money that myself, I see no reason to throw it away. The unit is located in Bellingham, Washington and is truly free on the condition that the 'purchaser' pays for all the related costs of removing it from my house and getting it to its final destination. I'm generally at school 12-16 hours a day, so this will include movers, crating and freight if you are not in the Bellingham region. If you are in the Bellingham region, you'll need to bring your own trailer, etc etc.

As a note, the unit does weigh 400lbs and is not on a ground level access. It must be taken down an eight-set of stairs to reach the front door of the house. You can contact me via reply or by PM if you're interested in the unit.

I thought I'd post this here for a while before I start advertising the set on more local channels in the hopes that somebody who understands what they're getting into might be interested in picking it up.

Regards,
Matt
post #2246 of 2919
Seems to have been established that the set turns on properly from dead cold, and only malfunctions after warming up. Classic symptoms this thread began with, where the resoldering op should do it. Under these conditions there has rarely been any deviation from that.

Hopefully someone will snag this great offer, and skedaddle home with it.



Contact me if you want me to do the soldering for you...


b
post #2247 of 2919
Quote:
Originally Posted by GLCII View Post

I finally got my Flashing Screen straightened out. A guy named Bill Covert in Monroe Michigan that works at a Durochers Appliance/Service Center resoldered the power board for $65.00. Now the Pioneer SD582HD5 looks good again with no blue/white flashing. I went there armed with the info I got here and told him what it was doing and what people discovered as being the problem. He was the only person out of all but one service techs I talked to that was even interested in looking at it. The other one was Mr. Bob

Bill said he would let people send in their boards if they wanted and he would resolder them. So if anyone in here is from the Michigan area or surrounding states, keep him in mind.

Mr. Bob Thank You for your help as well. Your input was Priceless!!!

Like you, last year I pulled my Pro-510 PS Board out and took it to a local expert in the Washington D.C. area to be re-soldered. My cost was similar to what you paid. Almost a year later, I've had no problems.

Mr Bob provides the "Gold Standard" for this service and has singlehandedly added years of great viewing life to these fine Pioneer RPTVs. His prices reflect that "Gold Standard". His promise that your Power Supply Board will work or he will fix it warrants consideration. My repair shop would not make that promise without having the entire TV for inspection.

If you decide to shop around due to price sensitivities or other reasons be sure to do your research. In addition to Mr Bob's suggestions, you should provide the following directions, as a minimim, to your repair shop:

--------------------------------------------------
From: Name and Contact Information

RE: Pioneer Elite, Pro-510 HD (Ser #.................) Power Supply Board. This board was originally poorly engineered at factory, with thin solder at many points.

Work: Inspect board under good light and magnification and resolder as required.

1. Check entire PS Board for cold solder joints, joints that appear dull, dry, ring fractures, haloed. Remove old solder (if required), reapply new solder.

2. Potential bad/cracked/fractured joints and connectors which require resolder as a minimum:

a. IC202, IC204, E2, E3, E5
b. T101 (the large transformer in the middle of the board)
c. Copper Coils
d. Large Filter Capacitor
e. Check for broken solder joints on connector E3 (especially 12+ supply and GND, Pin 13) and the joints for and around IC204 and IC202 …"cold solder" with possible ring fractures.
f. Check regulator, rectifier, transformer leg joints for cracked solder joints.

3. When complete, please closely inspect for solder bridges and stray solder dots which may cause shorting when power is applied.

-----------------------------------------

These directions come from a review of the many potential PS board fault points noted by members of this forum. I'm not claiming it is all inclusive or that it will correct every PS board problem. It worked in my situation with my repair shop at a price I considered reasonable. With these directions they could assess the time involved and provide a cost estimate. I welcome additional inputs to this list.

Dave
post #2248 of 2919
I don't agree. I think you'll be seeing problems again within a year.

The entire board was badly soldered at the factory, and those points that are not bad yet will go bad in the future. Pinpointing like you have done there will only set you up for a more serious problem later. A point source solution is not the answer. Only a shotgun approach will permanently cure the situation.

With very few and very limited exceptions, which I have elaborated upon many times here in this thread, the entire board has to be resoldered. Some techs would do that for $65, but it takes hours, and the finer, more seasoned and experienced techs simply would not. I would not, not for only that much.

Your info is from the start of this thread. That was literally years ago and we have come a long way since then, and no, you can't just do what you said and prevail, on a permanent basis. Doing what you said is NOT the answer. Parts of it are good, but all due respect, the critical stuff is flawed.

If your tech spends a minute less than an hour and a half with the actual soldering of your board, plus between 20-45 minutes inspecting it later, the job that needs to be done will not have been done. Many techs will need to take a lot longer than that, to do it right. Takes me a couple of hours just for the soldering. Most simply won't have the patience. They will see all those super small conn's, very prone to solder bridges, and not even try on those, lest something get improperly connected between them.

The "Gold Standard" you speak of in not just reputation. It's based on results, results that have been hard fought for and hard won, and sometimes very expensively.

But the information I put out stays the same. You can't do it halfway and expect reliable, repeatable and 100% efficacious results. To do so is actually dangerous, why is explained a few posts or pages back from here.

This end of the thread has all the good info. The start of this thread is by now hopelessly outdated.


b
post #2249 of 2919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bob View Post

I don't agree. I think you'll be seeing problems again within a year.

The entire board was badly soldered at the factory, and those points that are not bad yet will go bad in the future. Pinpointing like you have done there will only set you up for a more serious problem later. A point source solution is not the answer. Only a shotgun approach will permanently cure the situation.

With very few and very limited exceptions, which I have elaborated upon many times here in this thread, the entire board has to be resoldered. Some techs would do that for $65, but it takes hours, and the finer, more seasoned and experienced techs simply would not. I would not, not for only that much.

Your info is from the start of this thread. That was literally years ago and we have come a long way since then, and no, you can't just do what you said and prevail, on a permanent basis. Doing what you said is NOT the answer. Parts of it are good, but all due respect, the critical stuff is flawed.

If your tech spends a minute less than an hour and a half with the actual soldering of your board, plus between 20-45 minutes inspecting it later, the job that needs to be done will not have been done. Many techs will need to take a lot longer than that, to do it right. Takes me a couple of hours just for the soldering. Most simply won't have the patience. They will see all those super small conn's, very prone to solder bridges, and not even try on those, lest something get improperly connected between them.

The "Gold Standard" you speak of in not just reputation. It's based on results, results that have been hard fought for and hard won, and sometimes very expensively.

But the information I put out stays the same. You can't do it halfway and expect reliable, repeatable and 100% efficacious results. To do so is actually dangerous, why is explained a few posts or pages back from here.

This end of the thread has all the good info. The start of this thread is by now hopelessly outdated.


b

Thanks for responding. I keep coming back to this thread because of the civility of the posters. I defer to your expertise and experience in disagreeing and thinking I will see problems within a year. I'll let you know what happens...so far not a single symptom of impending failure.

My objective for repair was to eek one more year or two of life out of my fine 11 year old Pro-510 while assessing and moving to another display technology. I wasn't seeking permanent solutions, wanted a repair at a cost which seemed reasonable to me (while accepting the risk), and decided I wasn't going to spend more money should other failures occur. Other people's objectives might dictate a different repair approach.

There are qualified technicians in my area who can resolder these PS boards. If we decide to give them to someone other than you to repair, I believe we should provide them both general and specific instructions (which I do). Clearly, a point source solution is not the sole answer to repairing these boards. I will thoroughly review the last few pages of the thread to ensure I'm up-to-date and to find flaws in my "critical stuff" as you say.

Here are my take-aways from your response:

1. Ensure the tech is fully qualified to do the work. If they say it will take less than two hours be skeptical and ask more questions.

2. Resolder the entire PS board. Post-soldering inspection must be thorough and detailed. This is critical.

Dave
post #2250 of 2919
Thanks for the respect you have shown me on these issues, Dave. Appreciate it.


Much as I need the business of resoldering these boards on my own, since very few CRT RPTVs are getting calibrated anymore while being swamped with the continuous flow of fixed pixel, the more that actually get saved by somebody's resoldering process the better. CRT is still the best medium out there, as evidenced by the Screenshot War!!!!!!!! thread,

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...00831&page=148

and there are still enough of us CRT afficianados around for CRT to still be the best for years to come, emminently worthy of the finest calibration attention. Flat panel may look sexy, but it still does not have the maturity CRT has gained thru many years of use and renovation and fine tuning. With floor standing front speakers on either side of your Elite CRT unit you need its depth anyway, and that same depth puts your screen 2 feet closer to your eyes than flat panel does. 2' is a huge percentage of the eyes to screen viewing distance most home viewers have in their viewing rooms, and when you compromise that with getting a flat panel, you have to get a commensurately bigger flat panel - with commensurately huge cost increases - to compensate and wind up where you started, as far as size of viewed picture goes.

So I have no problem with my CRT set being thicker than a flat panel. I actually like that. Puts it that much closer to me.


So I am going to repeat something you'll find in this thread if you look, but it could take you awhile.


What does NOT need to be resoldered are the test points, the heat sinks, and anything else that has already been soldered correctly.

Test points go nowhere during operation. The only thing connected to the heat sinks is a cap - which means the heat sinks are directly connected nowhere in there, as such needing no resoldering. And many of the joints were resoldered later and are still glossy and gleaming, like good/well soldered joints should be. This would include the big resistors, the horizontal output transistor - THE main power supply part - and the 4 leg diode bridge, among others.

Everything else - 99% of the board - still needs to be resoldered, including many super small joints that are really close to each other and very prone to a "solder bridge" happening between them. Which of course is a dead short, and NO circuit design can sustain misconnections like those without a high risk of damage, both to the board itself and to boards and other circuits downline from it, since this board - the power supply board - directly powers up the entire unit.

That's why the inspection process afterwards is so critical and cannot be skimped on, timewise. It takes what it takes, and I always triple inspect my boards before sending them out, make sure I haven't missed anything.

Those of you who have seasoned, exprienced techs or assemblers closeby might want to print out these messages here - including my last post, which also contains critical info for any tech wanting to actually take this task on - and take them with you when you interview your local tech.

Those of you who simply want the tried and true Image Perfection resoldering job done on your PS board and don't want to take any chances, do the Gold Standard and send your boards to me. The Gold Standard is well within reach of anybody who paid $5000/6000/7000 for these units back when they were new. Some I've heard of paid over $12,000 for their 710 back then. Doesn't matter how much - or how little - you may pay for a new HDTV today. What matters is that to not keep your set going, you'd be throwing away that original $6000/6000/7000/12000. That means whatever you pay for a new set today, add that to what you originally paid back then, and that's your actual total expenditure, deal done, today.

Thanks again, Dave, between us maybe we can continue to save these boards and the Elite CRT units they power up. I have already saved tons of Elite and non-Elite CRT units so far, and intend to continue to keep saving them for years to come. For optimum performance each one saved will need cleaning and calibration, and to be brought back to new condition, which is also very affordable. And better than new status if desired. I intend to be here for that as well.

With your help here, maybe even more of them can be saved.



Mr Bob
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