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How to record via IEEE 1394 (Firewire) to Windows XP - Page 191

post #5701 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSperber View Post

through TV/ATSC tuner cards and Ceton/cablecard cards on an HTPC.

Ah that's right. Couldn't you rent a cablecard from your cable provider? Then how would that work?
post #5702 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty588 View Post

Couldn't you rent a cablecard from your cable provider? Then how would that work?

Yes, that's exactly how the Ceton 4-tuner card works.

You rent an M-Card from your cable company and insert it into the Ceton card which is installed in a PCI-e slot of your Win7 PC, where Windows Media Center has total control of the Ceton card and acts as a true DVR (recording to hard drive on your PC). This is an HTPC setup that replaces a cable company DVR.

After some configuration and coordination with your cable company (who will have to come out to activate the M-Card), you're in business. Your Win7 PC is now also a DVR with full access to your cable service (except for pay-per-view, since cablecards don't support 2-way communication).

And you can watch/record/playback all channels you subscribe to. You can also deliver the same live/recorded content to other HDTV's around your house (via Ethernet cable), through a Media Center Extender device located at those other HDTVs. You can use an XBox as such an Extender, or you can find "passive" extenders such as the Linksys DMA2100 (which is no longer made, but which you can still find for sale).

The recordings from WMC are in "WTV" form, which is a HIGHLY SECURE form that for a copy-once program is encrypted and tightly locked down with DRM. There are serious restrictions about when/how you can watch it (although there are no restrictions if you simply use the same PC you recorded it on originally, to watch it back at a later time), what happens if you reinstall Win7, etc.

Anyway, if the programs recorded to WTV through this WMC/Ceton/M-Card arrangement are "copy freely", then it's 100% perfectly ok to produce BluRay versions (retaining 100% perfect video quality). But if the programs are "copy once" then you have the same set of impossible obstacles to doing anything with it other than just watching in on THAT particular PC running the very installed Win7 that did the recording.

Note that player/editing programs (e.g. VideoRedo TV Suite) can handle copy-freely WTV files without a problem. But no program other than Windows Media Center on THE SAME MACHINE THAT DID THE RECORDING can read/de-crypt copy-once WTV files.

(Note: I have one of these WMC/Ceton/M-Card setups on my own HTPC, which allowed me to return my DCX3400 to TWC/LA and instead simply rent an M-Card from them).
post #5703 of 6013
Couldn't you simply use a screen capture program like Camtasia to record whatever WMC is showing you?

Also, how much do you pay to rent that the M-Card from your cable company?
post #5704 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty588 View Post

Couldn't you simply use a screen capture program like Camtasia to record whatever WMC is showing you?

They try to make that tough with x64 video drivers...screen cap programs won't record properly in a lot of situations. And you'd get better results using the analog Component Video capture method discussed earlier, and even better if you use the Mux-HD and capture digitally from the HDMI (though it still isn't lossless b/c it applies MPEG4 AVC compression).

Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty588 View Post

Also, how much do you pay to rent that the M-Card from your cable company?

I think the cable cards are about $5 a month to rent.
post #5705 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty588 View Post

Also, how much do you pay to rent that the M-Card from your cable company?

$3.50 here in TWC/LA.

The Ceton card is about $300 now, and includes 4-tuners (as opposed to the 2-tuners available on DVRs.) And of course since the HTPC is the DVR, you can obviously install your own 1-2TB internal hard drive for huge recording capacity.

Note that the WMC recording folder can only be on a single drive, and cannot be specified as a "pool of folders" spread out on one or more drives. Also, the WMC Guide provides about 11-days into the future of Guide cells. Finally, the WMC series-recording scheduling mechanism is ABSOLUTELY BRILLIANT! You simply will NOT get any duplicates (regardless of whether "new" or "repeat" is present in the Info). Even if you set "anytime" you will not get repeats for any individual recording (due to the "original air date/time" information provided in the Zap2it provider details for the Guide). So this allows you to, say, catch up on episodes of a series you'd missed the start of if they have a "marathon" and show all previously aired episodes on a single day, even more than once on that day. No repeats will be recorded. It's SIMPLY BRILLIANT!

Also, if it's of any relevance to you, the Ceton 4-tuners can be "network shared" among multiple Win7 machines on your home LAN. Obviously you can't use a tuner on more than one PC at a time, so sharing it this way would reduce the number of tuners available on individual PCs at a given time. But it is a way to conceptually have more than one HTPC in your house by allocating the Ceton tuners to specific Win7 PCs around the house.

This means you don't have to use Windows Media Center Extenders to support multiple HDTVs, but only if you do have a Win7 PC near each HDTV, and you only need to have one single Ceton 4-tuner card installed in one of your PCs. This will allow you to watch/record copy-once content all around the house and not require an Extender, but again only from the particular PC on which that copy-once content was recorded.

Me... in addition to the HDTV at my one single HTPC with the Ceton tuner card in it (well, to be honest it's my second computer monitor, an Eizo HD2441W which I use either as my extended desktop monitor or to watch HDTV in a window or full-screen), I also have two DMA2100 extenders at my two other HDTVs around the house so that I can watch ALL content (both copy-once and copy-always) at ANY HDTV with no restrictions or considerations. HDTV through extenders can watch anything at all... live or recorded, copy-once or copy-freely, with no restrictions. And each extender has its own Windows Media Center remote, so it's really just like watching your cable company's DVR at any HDTV, with a "whole house" implementation. Record once... watch anywhere.
post #5706 of 6013
I agree that the Windows Media Center on Windows 7 rocks! The guide is very good (and free) and it is extremely good with series recordings. Microsoft really did a great job with it.
post #5707 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty588 View Post


Meanwhile HD rips of TV shows pop up online 15 minutes (if that) after airing. No idea what their capture method is though.

Well, the best way to record over the air TV shows is well over the air, there are no copy flags that block OTA recording. The only channels that I cannot record by firewire to my computer from Comcast cable here is the premium movie channels.

You can also get all the PBS channels by satellite as they are not encrypted and you get the full HD bandwidth and bit rate with no logos, takes about a 1 meter dish.

Mike T
post #5708 of 6013
well I happened across as DCX-3400-M today. And the FireWire appears to work!! At least for the 1 minute test that I've performed thus far.

Provider: Comcast in the south SF Bay area
Firmware Ver: 22.65
S/W Ver: 78.54 - a28p4.1005.r-6

I'll keep everybody posted.
post #5709 of 6013
False alarm. The DCX still can't capture FireWire. I got lucky on my first capture, but now it's doing the weird stuttering/fast-forwarding crap that other people have complained about.

I'll try and narrow in on how I was able to get a good 10 minute 1080i capture (and I presume I could have let it continue a lot longer, had I been patient). The unit had not been powered on for long and one of the tuners was tuned to an SD channel and I was recording from the live tuner.
post #5710 of 6013
So it appears that the DCX-3400-M can properly capture from the live tuner, but any attempt to capture a DVR recording causes the stuttering fast-forwarding bug.

As long as I stick to capturing live tv, things seem fine. This bug is very much like one that briefly impacted the DCT/DCH DVR cable boxes back in 2007.
post #5711 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSperber View Post

From the Hauppauge description of the product:[indent]Colossus also has an HDMI input port, so you can record HD video at up to 1080i from a un-encrypted HDMI source.

They make an external box with analog HD component recording and remote blasting: http://www.amazon.com/Hauppauge-1212.../dp/B0018LX0DY

Sure, it records to AVCHD, but that's still a nice trade-off to get around the copy protection flags.
post #5712 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmortal03 View Post

They make an external box with analog HD component recording and remote blasting: http://www.amazon.com/Hauppauge-1212.../dp/B0018LX0DY

Sure, it records to AVCHD, but that's still a nice trade-off to get around the copy protection flags.

It records to MPEG-4. You have several options for the format: .TS, .M2TS, and .MP4 (though the .MP4 stuff seems to be buggy and is best avoided). What you choose to do with the MPEG-4 video file is up to you. I tend to use the .TS format and copy it to a USB thumbdrive for playback with my Sony BDP-S570 Blu-ray player. Sometimes I create a BD (Blu-ray disc) or AVCHD disc (which is almost the same as a BD except it uses a regular DVD, limiting you to only 4.3 GB or 8.5 GB for dual layer).

I own both the Hauppauge Colossus and the Hauppauge HD-PVR 1212. They're both great, but I prefer the Colossus b/c it doesn't use USB; the USB can be picky, especially if you have USB filter drivers installed by Apple iTunes or VMware, etc. The Colossus is a PCI-Express card and is thus more stable (though obviously less portable...I can take my HD-PVR 1212 and use it on any of my computers very easily).

It is very important to understand that the Colossus can record from both unprotected HDMI *and* from Component Video. The Colossus also has the IR-blaster. In fact, the only thing the Colossus can't do that the HD-PVR 1212 does is record from S-Video and Composite Video. So basically you won't be able to transfer VHS tapes to BD or AVCHD. And, frankly, that's no loss at all being that the software it uses is not able to capture properly from a VCR without buying an ungodly expensive Time Base Corrector to work around the bug (without a TBC, video captured from a VCR looks really awful).

So really the only advantage that the HD-PVR has is easy portability, because it uses USB. But that brings with it some baggage...I have had good luck with it because I treat my OS *very* carefully and don't allow much software on the computer that I use the HD-PVR 1212 with, so there are no destabilizing USB filter drivers to contend with. But if you hop on over to the Hauppauge UK support forum, you'll see that a lot of people have issues (and probably also have horribly maintained operating systems with waaayy to much trash installed on it...ultimately, most of those problems are likely not the fault of the HD-PVR 1212 and realistically will require a reinstall of the OS to overcome).

The biggest advantage that the Colossus has over the HD-PVR 1212 is the ability to record from uprotected HDMI (used by most customers to record from the xbox 360, which has unprotected HDMI output). With the HD-PVR 1212, your only option for HD recording is to use Component Video.

One theoretical advantage that the Colossus has over the HD-PVR 1212 is the ability to record to MPEG-2 (instead of MPEG-4). I say theoretical because the included software only allows you to use MPEG-4, but the Colossus hardware would be perfectly happy to record to MPEG-2 if compatible software would allow for that (and I'm not aware of any Colossus-compatible software that will let you record to MPEG-2). I would like to be able to do this because there are a lot of apps that work better with MPEG-2 than MPEG-4. For example, I'm mostly unable to get Nero 10 to burn the MPEG-4 files to BD without Nero insisting on re-encoding the entire file, which is unacceptable because it noticeably drops the video quality. Nero is far more lenient with MPEG-2 video and would likely not see a need to re-encode those. Currently when I need to create a BD (and Nero's being a pain in the ass about re-encoding), I use the freeware MultiAVCHD utility. It's a little harder to work with, but it won't force a re-encode, and thus it produces nicer looking BD's (although making attractive menu's can be a pain).

Anyways, unless portability is really important to you, I highly recommend the Hauppauge Colossus over the Hauppauge HD-PVR 1212.
post #5713 of 6013
Thanks for all the info, TNO821. So what they're doing is creating H.264 (MPEG-4 AVC) transport streams that you can then burn in the AVCHD or Blu-ray disc formats?
post #5714 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmortal03 View Post

Thanks for all the info, TNO821. So what they're doing is creating H.264 (MPEG-4 AVC) transport streams that you can then burn in the AVCHD or Blu-ray disc formats?

Exactly. It can only create MPEG-4 AVC H.264 files. You can pick one of three containers: .TS, .M2TS, or .MP4 (which, as mentioned above, appears to be buggy...you should pick either .TS or .M2TS and then use other software to re-mux it to .MP4 if that's the container you desire).
post #5715 of 6013
For those having trouble recording from firewire, an act which is legally mandated, due to a problem with the device, you have the right to explore other options of recording. Thus I can suggest a few; for those that are really bugged by this (warning, some awkward techniques I developed here):

-Firewire glitches can be automatically corrected if you have three copies, just need a program to take a majority vote byte-by-byte. Any programmer could write this in a few minutes. Only two copies are needed if you parse the log file from a TS analyzer like xport, tsdoctor, mpeg2repair etc. It could probably be done with programs like "diff".
-automatically patch glitched digital copies with portions of analog
-patch glitched audio with spdif recording (need ac3 in wav tool)
-note that you can record spdif audio, analog video, and firewire video at the same time, no problem
-record through s-video. Record through letterbox setting. If you want, record again through panscan setting and merge the two. I didn't see a big difference but it should be slightly less blurry in the middle portion of the screen.
-Record through component, but with a normal (not Colossus) tv card. The way to do this requires recording svideo once, then a y splitter merging Y+Pb to the composite input, and again with Y+Pr. These 3 recordings can be subracted to get true component video.
-Record true 480p through a normal TV card, but setting output to 480p and using the above method to record 480p component. The timings are about double the speed therefore you get two images side-by-side (assuming you get a picture). By some manipulations you can recover the 480p component video. One side of one frame gets cropped, but if you record *even more* copies in panscan, you can recover everything. Except there's probably a widescreen option for 480p? Depends on your box.
-Play in extreme slow motion, and take high megapixel continuous pictures of your screen. This requires using an HD calibration video first, then some programs can sort it all out later. Can probably reach nearly digital quality, theoretically.
-If you have zoom and/or pan options, you can piece those together too.
-Combine analog video with digital audio for 5.1
-combine *airings* of digital captures for much better quality. Certain frames (like the 2nd P after an I) have better quality, you can mix and match them. 720p movies with one airing, by picking the best copies of the movie frames (unless they are flagged frame repeats). This also applies to selecting frames from analog recordings!
post #5716 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

For those having trouble recording from firewire, an act which is legally mandated, due to a problem with the device, you have the right to explore other options of recording. Thus I can suggest a few; for those that are really bugged by this (warning, some awkward techniques I developed here):

-Firewire glitches can be automatically corrected if you have three copies, just need a program to take a majority vote byte-by-byte. Any programmer could write this in a few minutes. Only two copies are needed if you parse the log file from a TS analyzer like xport, tsdoctor, mpeg2repair etc. It could probably be done with programs like "diff".
-automatically patch glitched digital copies with portions of analog
-patch glitched audio with spdif recording (need ac3 in wav tool)
-note that you can record spdif audio, analog video, and firewire video at the same time, no problem
-record through s-video. Record through letterbox setting. If you want, record again through panscan setting and merge the two. I didn't see a big difference but it should be slightly less blurry in the middle portion of the screen.
-Record through component, but with a normal (not Colossus) tv card. The way to do this requires recording svideo once, then a y splitter merging Y+Pb to the composite input, and again with Y+Pr. These 3 recordings can be subracted to get true component video.
-Record true 480p through a normal TV card, but setting output to 480p and using the above method to record 480p component. The timings are about double the speed therefore you get two images side-by-side (assuming you get a picture). By some manipulations you can recover the 480p component video. One side of one frame gets cropped, but if you record *even more* copies in panscan, you can recover everything. Except there's probably a widescreen option for 480p? Depends on your box.
-Play in extreme slow motion, and take high megapixel continuous pictures of your screen. This requires using an HD calibration video first, then some programs can sort it all out later. Can probably reach nearly digital quality, theoretically.
-If you have zoom and/or pan options, you can piece those together too.
-Combine analog video with digital audio for 5.1
-combine *airings* of digital captures for much better quality. Certain frames (like the 2nd P after an I) have better quality, you can mix and match them. 720p movies with one airing, by picking the best copies of the movie frames (unless they are flagged frame repeats). This also applies to selecting frames from analog recordings!

That's some hardcore shiz
post #5717 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

For those having trouble recording from firewire, an act which is legally mandated, due to a problem with the device, you have the right to explore other options of recording. Thus I can suggest a few; for those that are really bugged by this (warning, some awkward techniques I developed here):

Any of your suggested solutions involving anything analog (i.e. S-video or component video) miss the point entirely. There is NO PROBLEM TODAY recording using these analog techniques, if all that was wanted was "some kind of recording".

The issue is to record DIGITALLY, via firewire, to preserve the original digital HD video and digital audio, exactly as-is.

Although nobody's yet done an actual analysis of the flawed datastream coming out of the firewire port on the DCX boxes, it's clear there is something seriously flawed in the stream that is much more than just a bit or two here or there that three robot/judges can vote on and decide which stream to use. Anything bad enough to produce the kind of bizarre audio and video artifacts, stuttering, echoes, freezes, etc., in both DVHS VCRs that have been around and working solidly for more than a decade as well as PC recordings of copy-freely content (all of which used to work essentially flawlessly for a decade, since the release of the original DCT* units) must truly be off by more than a bit or two here or there. Seriously flawed in some way.

Again, recording TODAY using the ANALOG outputs of the DCX (and all earlier models as well) is NOT a problem, and not THE problem discussed so much here on this thread. If all you want is a SD-DVD or analog tape recording, you CAN do that today with no problem. Upconvert letterboxed 480i all you want and falsely believe you have an "acceptable" result. You probably do, if that's satisfying to you.

But it's DIGITAL recording we are all after, and which simply still does not work using firewire output from the DCX product family of boxes (including the FIOS/Verizon flavor).
post #5718 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

For those having trouble recording from firewire, an act which is legally mandated, due to a problem with the device, you have the right to explore other options of recording. Thus I can suggest a few; for those that are really bugged by this (warning, some awkward techniques I developed here):

-Firewire glitches can be automatically corrected if you have three copies, just need a program to take a majority vote byte-by-byte. Any programmer could write this in a few minutes. Only two copies are needed if you parse the log file from a TS analyzer like xport, tsdoctor, mpeg2repair etc. It could probably be done with programs like "diff".
-automatically patch glitched digital copies with portions of analog
-patch glitched audio with spdif recording (need ac3 in wav tool)
-note that you can record spdif audio, analog video, and firewire video at the same time, no problem
-record through s-video. Record through letterbox setting. If you want, record again through panscan setting and merge the two. I didn't see a big difference but it should be slightly less blurry in the middle portion of the screen.
-Record through component, but with a normal (not Colossus) tv card. The way to do this requires recording svideo once, then a y splitter merging Y+Pb to the composite input, and again with Y+Pr. These 3 recordings can be subracted to get true component video.
-Record true 480p through a normal TV card, but setting output to 480p and using the above method to record 480p component. The timings are about double the speed therefore you get two images side-by-side (assuming you get a picture). By some manipulations you can recover the 480p component video. One side of one frame gets cropped, but if you record *even more* copies in panscan, you can recover everything. Except there's probably a widescreen option for 480p? Depends on your box.
-Play in extreme slow motion, and take high megapixel continuous pictures of your screen. This requires using an HD calibration video first, then some programs can sort it all out later. Can probably reach nearly digital quality, theoretically.
-If you have zoom and/or pan options, you can piece those together too.
-Combine analog video with digital audio for 5.1
-combine *airings* of digital captures for much better quality. Certain frames (like the 2nd P after an I) have better quality, you can mix and match them. 720p movies with one airing, by picking the best copies of the movie frames (unless they are flagged frame repeats). This also applies to selecting frames from analog recordings!

WOW what a mess, my guess is that you have never really done most of these methods. "then some programs can sort it all out later". Combining letterbox and pan-scan together is going to look "better" than a digital glitch in the data-WOW.

The cable boxes do reduce the visible glitches in the analog outputs by some error correction methods, so if you have problems with glitches in the data stream then just record from analog component outputs as it does not look "too bad".

I capture from the firewire out and make multiple recordings of the same program from the same channel to try to get a error free recording. I then edit the recordings with VideoREDO and then scan using the logging mode in mepg2repair. I then look at the logs and try to find recordings with no errors or low errors. I then take the recording with the longest error free start and load into VideoREDO and find a "cut scene" that I can remember and stop the first recording on the frame just before the cut scene and save that piece with a 0000 at the end of the file name. I then take the second recording and start at the next frame after the same cut scene and look for another cut scene just before any glitches in that recording, then save with 0001 at the end of the name. If there have been glitches before the part you save from the recording then you need to check the audio-video sync as the glitches can sometimes cause an error here. I do this until I have the complete program saved in pieces, hopefully without glitches present. I then load all the pieces into VideoREDO and select "join" when VideoREDO asks how to handle the multiple files. I then go to the "joiner" tab and make sure they are in the correct order and then select" make video from joiner list" and save the complete program. You cannot see where the cuts are made as they are frame accurate and there are no missing frames. It takes longer to explain the method than it usually takes me to do it. I usually only have about 3-7 program segments to join. I have done this many times and have gotten error free firewire recordings from an error prone cable system.

Mike T
post #5719 of 6013
Yes, I've tried tests on most of these methods.

It's up to you, but these are your choices:
-Firewire doesn't work for you, but you want digital, you have to buy two devices and spend several hundred $USD->Buy HDMI box and Colossus, or hope someone finds a workaround
-You'll take analog in the best quality, for less $USD->buy Colossus
-You don't want to spend any money, but have a capture card. You can use any of my methods.

Is a file patched with analog better than a glitch? That's up to you. I've seen this done by patching video of a (non-released) HD version with a DVD, I couldn't notice it. A glitch in audio is going to be more noticeable; I would definitely patch with a spdif/analog version.

As far the method of fixing with VideoRedo, I just made a tool to do all that for you automatically. Does someone want to test it? Prepare 3 short captures with glitches in different spots, next drag those files onto my tool, and a fixed version is automatically created. I'll release it soon.
post #5720 of 6013
Deglitchm ver 0.1 released
Fixes glitched transport streams
You need to prepare 3 captures of the same stream, starting close to the same point, and covering the full video, then drag them onto this program. The result is automatically output. For problems check the log file.
post #5721 of 6013
http://www.mediafire.com/?k54j8v8bpk7czir

ps it's probably quite slow! If it works I can improve that, but it'll take a day of effort.
post #5722 of 6013
To be fair to jmac698, I don't think his utility is meant to fix the type of devastating FireWire problems that plague the DCX DVR units. I think it is for the far milder "FireWire glitching" that was a hot topic of discussion at the latter part of last year...the type where you might have 5, 10, or 30 seconds of glitches for a half hour capture; so 98+% of the capture is fine.

I'm probably not going to be able to help test this utility, as I no longer seem to be able to get glitches (I know, it's a hard knock life).

I do agree with the comments about analog. The most I'd be willing to do is capture from HDMI, where at least everything stays digital the whole way through.
post #5723 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNO821 View Post
So it appears that the DCX-3400-M can properly capture from the live tuner, but any attempt to capture a DVR recording causes the stuttering fast-forwarding bug.
I have successfully captured a recorded HD program but my DCX-3400M (Shaw Cable) has since received a firmware update and I haven't tested with this.

I need to spend some time to carefully document the steps I took and update this thread but IIRC it went like this (and I don't know which of these steps are critical... I was trying a bit of everything):

- set both tuners to non encrypted (cable company encrypted not 5c) signals (I used Ch. 2 and 3... I've read of another user with success using two unauthorized channels).
- using the Swap button and LiveTV buttons, flip back and forth a couple of times and ensure both tuners are "live" and not caching
- (this is where I forget what worked) I believe I hit play on the DCX's recording then REC in CapDVHS but it could be the reverse. You'll know if it's right when the playback isn't stuttering while the PC is recording.

I captured a program with no more errors than I get with the DCT-3416. The resulting capture was mostly usable with one error luckily during a commercial.

My PC install is the exact same Vista 32-bit (with either ExDeus or Tim Moore package... I forget) as the day I built it in 2007. Anyway, it's the exact same setup that worked for years with a DCT-3146... the only change was my updating of the package's INF file to recognize the DCX by adding the strings with the box's model ID.
post #5724 of 6013
Quote:
The most I'd be willing to do is capture from HDMI, where at least everything stays digital the whole way through.
Just to point out, digital isn't the cure for everything - the only way to keep the quality would be to record uncompressed. If you compress the already compressed stream it may look quite bad. (There's actually a way to do that properly, in a paper I read. It was concerning the design of broadcast equipment for recompression of live streams.)
Overall it would be a tradeoff for more blockiness "to keep it digital" compared to slightly blurry (HD) analog.

Well, I got a dcx for myself, and live tv works great on all channels except 1, and any type of dvr playback fails, even pausing analog channels, and it stays that way until you turn it off or change channels. You can even be capping live and then start playback, and the live shows up perfectly then the recording shows up garbage. I'll be able to compare the two to see what's going on. It's probably possible to fix it, but it would take too many passes.

None of the tricks mentioned here worked for me.
post #5725 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

Just to point out, digital isn't the cure for everything - the only way to keep the quality would be to record uncompressed. If you compress the already compressed stream it may look quite bad. (There's actually a way to do that properly, in a paper I read. It was concerning the design of broadcast equipment for recompression of live streams.)

I understand that the re-compression theoretically should look worse. I myself expected to be able to easily spot differences (when using the Hauppauge Colossus to capture from HDMI). But that turned out to not be the case. In fact, there was only one time I thought I could see a difference...turns out I was wrong, the original just looked crappy and the capture exhibited the same level of crappiness. So I've become a lot less critical of HDMI captures, at least from the Colossus.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

Overall it would be a tradeoff for more blockiness "to keep it digital" compared to slightly blurry (HD) analog.

Yeah and, given a choice, I prefer slight blurring to MPEG blocks...but I haven't been seeing additional MPEG blocks in my HDMI captures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

Well, I got a dcx for myself, and live tv works great on all channels except 1, and any type of dvr playback fails, even pausing analog channels, and it stays that way until you turn it off or change channels.

I've performed tests where I can still get the FireWire capture to work after using the 15-second skip back button (but only 1 skip-back. If I hit that button 2 or more times, it would flake out just like when attempting to record a DVR playback).

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

You can even be capping live and then start playback, and the live shows up perfectly then the recording shows up garbage. I'll be able to compare the two to see what's going on. It's probably possible to fix it, but it would take too many passes.

I like the positive outlook, but I'm not sure that it'd be possible to fix up a FireWire stream that's that screwed up. I mean, it doesn't even seem to be at the correct speed (it's like in a goofy, stuttering slow motion).

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post

None of the tricks mentioned here worked for me.

Tricks for what?
post #5726 of 6013
I used to use capDVHS to transfer shows from my motorola DVR to my PC, but now I have direcTV

I still have basic cable included with my internet package from charter communications, so I want to use my hauppauge HVR-1250 to record shows from network channels.

Unfortunately the included software WinTV7 is quite bad, there are many errors in the recorded shows, and it seems VideoRedo TV suite can't even properly remove commercials and re encode the .ts file due to these errors

What program do people use to record shows with their hauppauge 1250?
Is there a newer/better program than VideoRedo TV Suite 4 to remove commercials?

Thanks in advance
post #5727 of 6013
Tricks for getting firewire to work, for example setting both tuners to an analog channel, turn it off, set to analog channels again, press livetv, then capping.
Haven't tried the 15s skip, what button is that?
And you're confusing the symptoms of bad packets..
Anyhow, that doesn't really tell you how bad the steam is, because a small error can mess up a whole bunch of pictures. Mpeg has mechanisms to resync the stream after errors, every once in a while.
So put it this way, even if one byte is in the wrong place and somewhat often you would still get something that looks really messed up, when in fact it's 99% good.
I can only prove this by comparing good and bad packets of the same thing and see exactly how they changed.
Besides, I can tell that a few pictures come through every few seconds, I really only need 1 picture to come through to recover the whole thing perfectly - as long as I can use many passes to get a good picture in a different spot.

The fast forward motion I don't think means anything, it's just skipping over parts that it can't decode so it looks fast forward. You should realize that up to 15 pictures all rely on one picture, so if that first one picture was messed up, all 15 are messed up - in other words a very small damage can make playback look horrible. And a very small damage is easily fixable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Group_of_pictures
post #5728 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffD33 View Post

I used to use capDVHS to transfer shows from my motorola DVR to my PC, but now I have direcTV

I still have basic cable included with my internet package from charter communications, so I want to use my hauppauge HVR-1250 to record shows from network channels.

Unfortunately the included software WinTV7 is quite bad, there are many errors in the recorded shows, and it seems VideoRedo TV suite can't even properly remove commercials and re encode the .ts file due to these errors

What program do people use to record shows with their hauppauge 1250?
Is there a newer/better program than VideoRedo TV Suite 4 to remove commercials?

Thanks in advance

Probably better to ask over on the HTPC forum, there are a number of threads there on the Hauppauge devices.
post #5729 of 6013
So I switched over to FiOS and have received a cisco 435HDC DVR. Has firewire, not sure if it's active or not. Any idea how I might be able to modify the INF file for installation to get it working?
post #5730 of 6013
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLIVE View Post

So I switched over to FiOS and have received a cisco 435HDC DVR. Has firewire, not sure if it's active or not. Any idea how I might be able to modify the INF file for installation to get it working?

Connect the FireWire to a Windows 7 or Vista machine. Go to the Start Menu and type "Device Manager" in the search box (without the quotes). This will bring up the Device Manager, where you'll be able to get the Hardware ID string.

In the Device Manager, find the entry for your FIOS device (it'll probably be listed under Unknown Devices or maybe Imaging Devices) and double-click on it. That'll bring up a Properties dialog. Go to the Details tab and use the drop-down listbox to select Hardware Id's

That'll display the needed info, which will look something like this:
AVC\\MOTOROLA&DCX-34xx&TYP_5&ID_0

If you can get me that string, I can alter the .inf for you.
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