or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Direct View (single tube) CRT Displays › The Official Kd-34xbr960 Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Kd-34xbr960 Thread - Page 248

post #7411 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ennui View Post

Best HD CRT...the 4:3 XBR100 (1997) was a very good CRT equaling the 960 in my opinion.

Of course this is one of those subjects there will likely never be an answer to, but I would probably dispute this claim.

My cousin has an XBR800, and I have an XBR960... and these are not equivalent in picture quality. They're just not. Is the XBR800 very good? Yes. Is its picture quality equal to that of my XBR960 when watching HD content? I say definitely not. The SFP picture tube in the 960 is just better, and the resulting image (presumably also the result of improved internal electronics and firmware to match, based on the enhanced service menu capabilities in the 960) is correspondingly better.

And that's the 16:9 XBR800, which I have to assume has a superior picture to the 4:3 XBR100 (though I've never seen one).

I suppose only a technical ISF-like objective comparison would truly settle this. Otherwise, it's really just a subjective discussion.

As for me, I will keep using my 960 until it dies.
post #7412 of 8134
Yeah, I'd be a little skeptical of a TV from 1997 equalling the 960 in any respect. I'm sure it was a fine set, but the SFP tubes were pretty much the pinnacle for consumer 1080i displays...and the reason why this thread keeps on going year after year.
post #7413 of 8134
My 34XBR2 from 2001 is still going strong. Recently I started using my HTPC's Nvidia color setting controls which offers greater flexibility than the Sony's picture control. I can afford a new HDTV but I can't come with a valid excuse.
post #7414 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by salty View Post

Yeah, I'd be a little skeptical of a TV from 1997 equalling the 960 in any respect. I'm sure it was a fine set, but the SFP tubes were pretty much the pinnacle for consumer 1080i displays...and the reason why this thread keeps on going year after year.

We bought ours new for $3000 in 1997 from Circuit City. This is the only model I have seen that had a separate tuner box. It had a "Super Trinitron" picture tube with 800 lines of horizontal resolution. It was still working well when we turned it in for our 46XBR8. The exact model is KV-32XBR100 and there are specs still at Sony's esupport site: http://esupport.sony.com/US/perl/mod...mdl=KV32XBR100. (We still have our 960 and are very pleased with it.)

I remember fighting with Cox to get good signal strength into the house in the 90's. HGTV had the best cameras in 1997 and had a noticeably better picture than the other channels.
post #7415 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by JA Fant View Post

CCordes01-

this is the best CRT ever. The only rival was a Pioneer Elite 60 inch Plasma.

Since I have owned, and still own, three HD crts I do note the SFP SONY's are slightly, but not markedly, superior to my RCA 36MM100.

As far as the SONY's, go I like the 36kd955xs picture better than my 960's so the latter is in the basement and little used and the 4:3 is primary viewing - but the 960 has the firewire capability advantage so I wouldn't part with it.

The bottom line is that they are all performing admirably with two of the three still in daily use after all these years. I know the NEC poster didn't like the reliability of the SONY's and RCAs but you could have (and they did) fool me
post #7416 of 8134
Hey guys. I have the 34XS955 (same tubes) equivalent of the 960 and I also agree that the set is absolutely stunning. As some of you know, hi there DSperber and thanks again for all your hard work along with Kentech and ADR for the Sony Service Code thread, I use my CRT for gaming, which is actually a bit different that watching movies.

Game textures use different types of compression, shaders, lighting, and all sorts of things are done differently and in real time. They all simply act a bit different than compressed video. I just re-visited my set and re-worked everything from the geometry to the manual focus adjustment on the back of the set. I went through nearly everything and read up on more "stuff" about the codes and, although 99% of it is still Greek to me, I did end up copying a set of codes for the 3DNR and DRCV groups that appear to be "almost" universal for the majority of 34XS955's.

Other than some typical geometry and horizontal convergence issues the set looks pretty phenomenal. It's as if the processing used in these sets, when tweaked to taste, can offer the same benefits graphics cards in PC's have. Things like texture filtering and anti-aliasing can be, in a sense, pulled out of these sets. I plan on picking up an XBR960 if I can find one in decent shape. There are a lot of things I wish I knew when I first tinkered with my set but, you live and learn, I was just dumb about things back then. I'll consider my 955 a testbed and take the knowledge I gained and use it on the 960 when I get a few dollars to hunt one down.

It's too bad SED didn't come around or that CRT manufacturers pushed the tech a bit further.
post #7417 of 8134
Purchased one locally on craigslist last Tues. Paid $220 with matching stand, shelf, remote, and manuals.

What is the best way to set up and program the following components:

1.) AT&T U-Verse Cisco TV. box

2.) Sony DVP-NS575P DVD player

3.) Sony SLV-679HF VHS player

4.) Sony AV Cordless IR receiver IFT-R10 (so videos from Sony CCD-TRV43 NTSC camcorder can be viewed without cords), if possible

5.) Sony E Series Laptop VPCEB, if possible

Is it still possible to use the integrated tuner, or do I have to use the new ones that were offered during the government transition in the event I want to use over -the-air signal instead of paid viewing?

Any recommendations for altering audio and visual settings for best sound and picture, as I have read that the spec. settings are not optimal

All comments appreciated![/size][/font]
post #7418 of 8134
Well, notice that the coating is starting to come off more along the left edge of the screen. It's noticable when the set is off (no big deal) and can only be viewed when all the lights are on and one sits from toward the right of the set. With the lights on low, it is only slightly noticable (if one looks for it) at a certain angle only.

But it does bother me.

I've read where others have removed the coating. Is it difficult to do and can it leave the screen in even worse condition that before? Or is there some sort of liquid that can actually cover up the blotches and return it closely resembling the orginal?

And without any anti-glare coating, is the picture quality affected in any way by being too bright, etc. which cannot be compensated with user adjustments.

Thanks as always,
Joe
post #7419 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by RalphArch View Post

The bottom line is that they are all performing admirably with two of the three still in daily use after all these years. I know the NEC poster didn't like the reliability of the SONY's and RCAs but you could have (and they did) fool me

If you're talking about the post for a TV to consider, he wanted a SD TV, not a high-end HD CRT.
The reliabilty of the XBR sets is not to be compared with the usual Sony's. The construction quality of the circuit, picture tube and soldering quality is on a complete different class than the FS series(KV-32FS120 esp.) and all the S and V series from 1997 on. I have repaired so much of these TV's (like more than 40-60 per year) for supply, tube, vertical, bad solders, the awesome blinking issue where the TV won't come on but you can open it with the service menu (32fs120) and even tube failures and all. I even saw one of the WEGA sets that the resistor INSIDE the tube had burned up. Why they put a resistor inside the vacuum is a question to ask Sony, since it had to be scrapped.
The only repairs I made on XBR 34" are picture tube problems (blue cathode had shorted, tube was shot) but as for circuitry, everything was perfect and very well constructed.
I would buy oe
post #7420 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by RalphArch View Post

The bottom line is that they are all performing admirably with two of the three still in daily use after all these years. I know the NEC poster didn't like the reliability of the SONY's and RCAs but you could have (and they did) fool me

If you're talking about the post for a TV to consider, he wanted a SD TV, not a high-end HD CRT.
The reliabilty of the XBR sets is not to be compared with the usual Sony's. The construction quality of the circuit, picture tube and soldering quality is on a complete different class than the FS series(KV-32FS120 esp.) and all the S and V series from 1997 on. I have repaired so much of these TV's (like more than 40-60 per year) for supply, tube, vertical, bad solders, the awesome blinking issue where the TV won't come on but you can open it with the service menu (32fs120) and even tube failures and all. I even saw one of the WEGA sets that the resistor INSIDE the tube had burned up. Why they put a resistor inside the vacuum is a question to ask Sony, since it had to be scrapped.
The only repairs I made on XBR 34" 's are picture tube problems (the blue cathodes had shorted, tube was shot) but as for circuitry, everything was perfect and very well constructed.
post #7421 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv View Post

The reliabilty of the XBR sets is not to be compared with the usual Sony's. The construction quality of the circuit, picture tube and soldering quality is on a complete different class than the FS series(KV-32FS120 esp.) and all the S and V series from 1997 on. I have repaired so much of these TV's (like more than 40-60 per year) for supply, tube, vertical, bad solders, the awesome blinking issue where the TV won't come on but you can open it with the service menu (32fs120) and even tube failures and all. I even saw one of the WEGA sets that the resistor INSIDE the tube had burned up. Why they put a resistor inside the vacuum is a question to ask Sony, since it had to be scrapped.
The only repairs I made on XBR 34" 's are picture tube problems (the blue cathodes had shorted, tube was shot) but as for circuitry, everything was perfect and very well constructed.

The '97 TV I had was an XBR2 (XBR squared). FYI.
post #7422 of 8134
how much is this tv worth? Buddy of mine is upgrading to a 60 inch 6020 kuro and he is selling this tv with the sony stand that was made for it. He wants 400 dollars for it, including the stand, which seems a little steep. He did baby the hell out of the tv I dont think I ever saw a spec of dust on it ever the past 6 years hes owned it. It does look like it just got opened out the box. But it was used heavily he says he would average out the use of it to 16 hours a day everyday (some days not used sometimes left on 24 hours while sleeping) this comes out to 35,000 hours of use on the tv. Whats the expect life of this tv?

I already own a Samsung un55b8500 and un46b8500 the 46 inch in the basement and 55 inch in the family room. Just thinking of getting something cheap to put in the guest bedroom and I guess this crt is supposed to have superior PQ to everything else (but the full array local dimming samsung b8500 series I think looks crisper and has pure deep blacks plus its massively bigger. Just the viewing angle sucks[but i always get the sweet spot for viewing])

So is 400 a good price for this tv (including the stand sony made for it) with 35k hours on it or is it about to poop out?
post #7423 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by laststop311 View Post

how much is this tv worth? Buddy of mine is upgrading to a 60 inch 6020 kuro and he is selling this tv with the sony stand that was made for it. He wants 400 dollars for it, including the stand, which seems a little steep. He did baby the hell out of the tv I dont think I ever saw a spec of dust on it ever the past 6 years hes owned it. It does look like it just got opened out the box. But it was used heavily he says he would average out the use of it to 16 hours a day everyday (some days not used sometimes left on 24 hours while sleeping) this comes out to 35,000 hours of use on the tv. Whats the expect life of this tv?

I already own a Samsung un55b8500 and un46b8500 the 46 inch in the basement and 55 inch in the family room. Just thinking of getting something cheap to put in the guest bedroom and I guess this crt is supposed to have superior PQ to everything else (but the full array local dimming samsung b8500 series I think looks crisper and has pure deep blacks plus its massively bigger. Just the viewing angle sucks[but i always get the sweet spot for viewing])

So is 400 a good price for this tv (including the stand sony made for it) with 35k hours on it or is it about to poop out?

I would say that's too high, especially if it has 35k hours on the tube. That's a lot of use and I do think that it's probably getting to the end of it's service life if it was left on all the time like that.

Sounds like he's already gotten his money's worth out of it :-). I'd pay no more than 200 bucks.
post #7424 of 8134
Like the previous poster said, 400$ is too much. But 35k hours is nothing for a crt. If the tube seems still strong - whites are white, black and white is black and white - 200-250$ is a very good price for a 34XBR960 and it should have a lot of hours left in it. Also, do check if it ever had any problems or shut-down with the self-check menu (Display, 5 , vol - , power).
post #7425 of 8134
The picture on it looks perfect. I still think my un55b8500 looks better. Everyone in here is talking like lcd and plasma is garbage compared to this set. Look at the blacks and whites of a b8500 with full array led local dimming. the blacks are as black as black can be. Sure in extreme situations like credits scrolling u can notice a slight brighter black halo around the letters but other than that the b8500 does an amazing job.

neccrttv what exactly am i looking for in the service menu? does it show the hours the tube has on it because he kinda guessed at 35k? What is the average life expectancy of the tube on this set? I guess tubes do last pretty long my grandma has a 1950's black and white tv that still works the same as when she bought it 60 freakin years ago.


The picture definately looks good on this set. But to say it is superior to every lcd and plasma is just so false. The pioneer kuro 9g has black levels that are barely even readable almost pure black and pioneer had the tech to make zero black level panels i think they called it fuga but they got out the game before it came to market.

Just help me out with the service menu thing ill try to get him to drop the price ill tell him to come look at this thread

also remember crt's went through like what 100 generations. Look what pioneer did with just 9 generations. Imagine how good plasmas will look if there were 100 generations of them.
post #7426 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by laststop311 View Post

The picture on it looks perfect. I still think my un55b8500 looks better. Everyone in here is talking like lcd and plasma is garbage compared to this set. Look at the blacks and whites of a b8500 with full array led local dimming. the blacks are as black as black can be. Sure in extreme situations like credits scrolling u can notice a slight brighter black halo around the letters but other than that the b8500 does an amazing job.

neccrttv what exactly am i looking for in the service menu? does it show the hours the tube has on it because he kinda guessed at 35k? What is the average life expectancy of the tube on this set? I guess tubes do last pretty long my grandma has a 1950's black and white tv that still works the same as when she bought it 60 freakin years ago.


The picture definately looks good on this set. But to say it is superior to every lcd and plasma is just so false. The pioneer kuro 9g has black levels that are barely even readable almost pure black and pioneer had the tech to make zero black level panels i think they called it fuga but they got out the game before it came to market.

Just help me out with the service menu thing ill try to get him to drop the price ill tell him to come look at this thread

also remember crt's went through like what 100 generations. Look what pioneer did with just 9 generations. Imagine how good plasmas will look if there were 100 generations of them.

CRT have a very high life expentency, I have seen myself some from the 70's that are used every day for 8-10 hours and that no color has shifted.
XBR sets have better tubes usually than the lower end models. Usually they have tubes made for crt monitors (M tubes instead of A tubes for example A68ADT27X01(27" RCA) and M90AHL50X like my XP37 Xtra (36" NEC)) that outlast most tubes. Remember that after about 1995, most companies shifted to Mexico for their factory's and tube quality(geometry, convergence), and life expentency suffered a lot. Life expentency shifted from 15-25 years to 5-10 years in low end V and S series of Sony. Try using the circuit of a 2001 Panasonic in a broken GAOO of 1994. It looked better than the 2001 and the 2001 was almost unused while the 1994's tube had been used for over 10 years at 2-4 hours daily.
Tube quality is so much lower than before... I've seen 1990's XBR (SD) with better quality in S-Video than most plasmas and lcd's in HD...

The XBR960 and the DA4 chassis is a chassis that has many digital filters and all and picture would have been 10 times better had it been analog multisync instead of digital. It's only a HDTV, like all LCD's and plasmas.
CRT and LCD (not LED LCD mind you) are not to be compared really, they are two completely different ways of showing an image. One is using additive coloring and the other one, subtractive (filtering) coloring.
I have to admit, Samsung makes by far some of the best LCD's and with the advent of select Led backlight control, LCD has surpassed any recent CRT HDTV (not monitors) since tube quality control is so low.
Only high end CRT and CRT monitors surpass LCD and plasma but since like 99% of the population has ugly low-end CRT's, of course lcd and plasma have taken over. Size and cost of construction was too much.

For all Sony's that are recent (1990 + and even older). the service menu can be attained by pressing, while the TV is closed, on the remote, Display, 5 then Volume up and then Power . I'll have to check if the da4 can tell you it's running hours. Pressing Display , 5 , then Vol down and then Power will enter self-check mode and tell you if the Tv has ever had a shutdown or some flashing lights in the past, advising you that the problem could come back.
post #7427 of 8134
neccrttv - my 960 is one that was assembled here, not in Mexico. Do you know if the sfp tubes in these were made here as well or south of the border?

Also had my first blinking and no display at power-on experience; 11 blinks then nothing. Unplugged it for ~ 30 mins and was its working again. So far, several days of on-off and no reoccurance. I know of the IC issues on these sets, but those are indicated with less blinks. Any ideas?
post #7428 of 8134
Even though it is assembled in PA and not mexico, most parts come from mexico. The tubes are all made at the same plant as far as I know....

As for the 11 blinks, if it ever does occur again, be sure to try to see if it starts up when you get in the service menu (display, 5, vol + and power). If it does, the problem is with the High voltage protect circuit. I have already encountered that 11 blinks many times and the TV works perfectly when in selfcheck or in the SM. A drop of solder on the HV protect transistor solved that in the KV-32FS120 CRT's that had that 11 blinks.
Of course, I'm not sure how that will work on the DA4 chassis since the circuit is a bit different.
What I can say for sure is that usually, 11 blinks means no IC's and parts to change. The TV shouldn't even be able to signal 11 blinks lol.
post #7429 of 8134
Neccrttv,

Any safe way of removing the coating on the 960 (non-N model)? It's starting to get splotchy in spots and though with the lights low they cannot be seen, it's still annoying. Or is it better to be safe and sorry and just don't start looking for them when the lights are bright?
post #7430 of 8134
I tried once on a HP monitor. Believe me, nothing will ever make it go away in some monitors. On some (and I say some) TV's it's only a small film on the CRT. But in the case of some CRT'S, like my HP monitor and very probably the XBR960, the anti-glare is a coating that was treated and cooked onto the glass. It cannot be removed unless you sand the whole thing down, and then it would ruin the glass. Tried that, the hours you'd have to waste and the risk of scratching the glass is too much, as I learned the wrong way. Luckily, I had a 2nd HP monitor that was identical but you would not want that to happen to a rare XBR960. Bear with it, believe me, small spots are nothing compared to deep scratches and unsmooth glass....

I believe it's the same as anti-glare in a pair of glasses. It's been cooked and treated to the glass, and now a part of the glass. But, like my glasses, a poor coating method means it starts to decay. I need to make new lens every 3 years because of the anti-glare coating,
post #7431 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv View Post

I tried once on a HP monitor. Believe me, nothing will ever make it go away in some monitors. On some (and I say some) TV's it's only a small film on the CRT. But in the case of some CRT'S, like my HP monitor and very probably the XBR960, the anti-glare is a coating that was treated and cooked onto the glass. It cannot be removed unless you sand the whole thing down, and then it would ruin the glass. Tried that, the hours you'd have to waste and the risk of scratching the glass is too much, as I learned the wrong way. Luckily, I had a 2nd HP monitor that was identical but you would not want that to happen to a rare XBR960. Bear with it, believe me, small spots are nothing compared to deep scratches and unsmooth glass....

I believe it's the same as anti-glare in a pair of glasses. It's been cooked and treated to the glass, and now a part of the glass. But, like my glasses, a poor coating method means it starts to decay. I need to make new lens every 3 years because of the anti-glare coating,

Hi Nec,

Thanks for the advice.

I'm with you - leave it alone. It's better than having a scratched up picture tube. What I see now is just glare reflecting off the areas that the coating has come off from. With the lights down low there is nothing to reflect hence, no glare or any notice of the areas with the blotches from most all viewing angles. Still wish Sony made all it's 960s like the 960N - or was there an advantage with the coating being on the outside of the tube?

Joe
post #7432 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph Dubin View Post

Hi Nec,

Thanks for the advice.

I'm with you - leave it alone. It's better than having a scratched up picture tube. What I see now is just glare reflecting off the areas that the coating has come off from. With the lights down low there is nothing to reflect hence, no glare or any notice of the areas with the blotches from most all viewing angles. Still wish Sony made all it's 960s like the 960N - or was there an advantage with the coating being on the outside of the tube?

Joe

Joe,

Neccrttv is right about some of the antiglare coats being "bake" on the tube. However, I believe earlier versions of the 960 had the coating applied differently. A gentleman who had an eariler version was able to peel the coat off. I asked him to send me some pictures and indeed his statements were just. Sony must of made revisions to attempt to correct the problem. Unfortunately, they didn't get it "right" until they started making the 960N. I'm in the same boat as you with the coating peeling off. I've stopped wiping my screen for almost a year now.
post #7433 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kool-aid23 View Post

Joe,

Neccrttv is right about some of the antiglare coats being "bake" on the tube. However, I believe earlier versions of the 960 had the coating applied differently. A gentleman who had an eariler version was able to peel the coat off. I asked him to send me some pictures and indeed his statements were just. Sony must of made revisions to attempt to correct the problem. Unfortunately, they didn't get it "right" until they started making the 960N. I'm in the same boat as you with the coating peeling off. I've stopped wiping my screen for almost a year now.

Hi Kool,

Feel the same way as you do. At first I thought it occured because I had used glass plus (which really makes the picture sparkle) but then it happened even with water. Worse is the fact that water leaves streaks on the glass.
So the more one applies a bit more pressure to remove them, the more the chances are of coating peeling off. But the screen does need to be washed to avoid the filmy build-up, even if dusted every day.

Guess we're in a no-win situation. It ain't appealing.

But still, with the lights low, it is not noticable.
post #7434 of 8134
My xs955 had the "peel-off" coating. Came off with about a half an hour's work. Looks a *little* brighter, but nothing too drastically different. However it collects dust now like crazy!

Also the glare is a little worse, obviously. I think I would have just left it on in hindsight, considering I didn't have any blotches etc.

I just have to fiddle with things though. :-)
post #7435 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by salty View Post
My xs955 had the "peel-off" coating. Came off with about a half an hour's work. Looks a *little* brighter, but nothing too drastically different. However it collects dust now like crazy!

Also the glare is a little worse, obviously. I think I would have just left it on in hindsight, considering I didn't have any blotches etc.

I just have to fiddle with things though. :-)
Yeah, I'm going to leave well enough alone and just be very, very gentle with the cold water.
post #7436 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by BTV Mark View Post

My set showed the same problem last September...3 days after I was laid off from my job!

I knew there was a fuse in there somewhere, but I could not find it. So I reluctantly called for service. The serviceman replaced the blown fuse for me. It took him at least 10 minutes of disassembly to access it. (Unfortunately, Sony did their best to hide it!) He told me I was very lucky the fuse was the only problem. He said in every other case he seen, a circuit board was also damaged, which is why the fuse usually blows. (He credited my whole-house surge protector and the old fuse with saving the board...but who knows?)

My suggestion: Unless you're really handy and comfortable working around electronics, call for service, and hope it's only a fuse.

Best of luck.


Mark


Well, about 20 months later, it happened again. The TV wouldn't turn on. Luckily, it turned out to be the same blown fuse again, and not a defective board. This time, using what I learned before, I was able to do the repair myself. I'd like to pass two things along:

1) Radio Shack does indeed have this part. (Although the original could be a fast-blowing fuse. The Radio Shack unit is a slow-blow.) Part # 270-1068. 6.3 amp 5 x 20 mm GMA-type. Sold 4 to a pack.

2) The fuse is on the AZ board (as earlier posts have confirmed). But the fuse can be replaced without moving or rotating the board. (I never figured out how to move or rotate the board.) The fuse is located just the other side of the line plug. Unplug the TV (!!) and take off the back cover. Then grab the line cord's plastic mounting plug and carefully slide it off the board. (It's attached to two short wires on the chassis side. So don't pull too hard.) You will then be able to see the old fuse right next to where the line cord's plastic plug sat (use a flashlight--it's on the top of the board in a socket). I pried the old one out of the socket with a small screwdriver. Then I gently placed the new on on top of the socket with a long-nose pliers. Finally, I pressed down on the fuse with a finger (it j-u-s-t reached!) until it snapped into position. Bingo! It's been working just fine for about two weeks now.

Since this is a slow-blow fuse, I'm hoping it fixes the problem for good. If it doesn't, then I probably have an underlying issue. On the other hand, I see the Internet has 7 and 8 amp fuses listed for sale. So that may be worth trying, although of course I certainly wouldn't do that unless it's a last resort. And I'm not recommending it.


Mark
post #7437 of 8134
How do tell pre N from post N is there a N in model number?
post #7438 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwpl View Post

How do tell pre N from post N is there a N in model number?

Yup.
post #7439 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph Dubin View Post

Yup.

Thanks, I have chance to buy one must be pre no N looks new though he wants a lot for it. Now a friends neighbor has a 40'' XBR cheap leaning towards getting it instead. Would get both but have giant TV's everywhere now.
post #7440 of 8134
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwpl View Post

Thanks, I have chance to buy one must be pre no N looks new though he wants a lot for it. Now a friends neighbor has a 40'' XBR cheap leaning towards getting it instead. Would get both but have giant TV's everywhere now.

I have the non-N model and it was produced in May, 2005. You can find the manufacturing date on the back by the serial numbers. The only difference between the two models is that the N models have the anti-glare coating inside the tube instead on the front - the problem with that is that the coating could come off a bit in areas just from ordinary cleaning. Actually doesn't cause any picture distortion and is not noticable with the lights low.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Direct View (single tube) CRT Displays › The Official Kd-34xbr960 Thread