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Comcast HDTV - Page 387

post #11581 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Jones View Post

The biggest issue I have with this (other than the obvious, QAM becoming obsolete AND hanging a box on every TV) is Comcast's "free" boxes NOT supporting HD. For that, we'll have to pay.

They're getting ready to roll out HD DTAs, the Moto box was just approved by the FCC. Whether it'll be free so it replaces the SD DTA (doubtful) and what channels it will get are still open questions.

I don't see Comcast encrypting the HD locals until these boxes get out there because of the backlash that will ensue, I'm sure lots of folks are using clear QAM on secondary sets.
post #11582 of 11976
When are they going to add BBC-HD (not On Demand, I'm talking about regular cable lineup) to Southern NH??

Comcast sucks.
post #11583 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinky-Dinkins View Post

When are they going to add BBC-HD (not On Demand, I'm talking about regular cable lineup) to Southern NH??

Comcast sucks.

I don't know the exact capacity issues of your system in NH; however, we just got BBC America-HD on Tuesday, along with all the other Xfinity promised channels.

Best holiday regards from Texas
post #11584 of 11976
I was notified of needing a DTA come the new year. I picked up the DTA today. They said that tomorrow someone is going to "remove something at the pole" and then I'd be able to self install the DTA.

The DTA I is a DC50XU. It says "xfinity" on it. It has a coax in and coax out.

So does anyone know what this actually means for me? I have just basic cable. I am on the Buena Vista/Glasgow/Lexington system in Virginia.

Will I get more or less channels? Will I still receive HD channels in HD?

Does the implementation of xfinity affect my HSI?
post #11585 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by snash22 View Post

I was notified of needing a DTA come the new year. I picked up the DTA today. They said that tomorrow someone is going to "remove something at the pole" and then I'd be able to self install the DTA.

The DTA I is a DC50XU. It says "xfinity" on it. It has a coax in and coax out.

So does anyone know what this actually means for me? I have just basic cable. I am on the Buena Vista/Glasgow/Lexington system in Virginia.

Will I get more or less channels? Will I still receive HD channels in HD?

Does the implementation of xfinity affect my HSI?

I cannot provide all the answers as we're on a Scientific Atlanta/Cisco based hardware system and I think you all in Virginia are on a Motorola based system; however, some things will be the same:

Your system probably still uses filters at the pole or junction box to keep you from receiving anything other than basic, analog signals. That's why they need to "remove something" so you can use the DTA

You'll install the DTA by connecting the incoming cable in your home to the DTA and the output of the DTA to your TV...

However, you will NOT be able to get HD via the current generation of DTA's, at least that's what occurs with the SA/Cisco DTA's. There will be a new generation of DTA's sometime in 2012 that will allow you to tune to local HD signals.

Hope this helps.
post #11586 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdguru View Post

I cannot provide all the answers as we're on a Scientific Atlanta/Cisco based hardware system and I think you all in Virginia are on a Motorola based system; however, some things will be the same:

Your system probably still uses filters at the pole or junction box to keep you from receiving anything other than basic, analog signals. That's why they need to "remove something" so you can use the DTA

You'll install the DTA by connecting the incoming cable in your home to the DTA and the output of the DTA to your TV...

However, you will NOT be able to get HD via the current generation of DTA's, at least that's what occurs with the SA/Cisco DTA's. There will be a new generation of DTA's sometime in 2012 that will allow you to tune to local HD signals.

Hope this helps.

No HD? I find this bizarre. I have a brand new HDTV with an ATSC tuner and it won't give me HD? Some other threads said this and I couldn't believe it would be possible.

I thought there was a law that the new HD channels needed to be passed in clear QAM (not sure of my terminology here).
post #11587 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by snash22 View Post

No HD? I find this bizarre. I have a brand new HDTV with an ATSC tuner and it won't give me HD? Some other threads said this and I couldn't believe it would be possible.

I thought there was a law that the new HD channels needed to be passed in clear QAM (not sure of my terminology here).

You will need a splitter and an old vcr in your setup-cable out from wall to splitter, then, from splitter to the tv's RF, then the other to the DTA, with the coax from that to the vcr. This allows your tv tuner to receive RAW cable to snag the unscrambled QAM channels, and then the DTA's feed can be viewed on the vcr's line input (vcr connected to the tv using composite cables).
post #11588 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westly-C View Post

You will need a splitter and an old vcr in your setup-cable out from wall to splitter, then, from splitter to the tv's RF, then the other to the DTA, with the coax from that to the vcr. This allows your tv tuner to receive RAW cable to snag the unscrambled QAM channels, and then the DTA's feed can be viewed on the vcr's line input (vcr connected to the tv using composite cables).

OK, so I just need to find the delta between unscrambled QAM and what is on the DTA to see if it is worth it.

I suppose an unsubscribed TiVo HD be useable here instead of the VCR?
post #11589 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by snash22 View Post

No HD? I find this bizarre. I have a brand new HDTV with an ATSC tuner and it won't give me HD? Some other threads said this and I couldn't believe it would be possible.

I thought there was a law that the new HD channels needed to be passed in clear QAM (not sure of my terminology here).

Does your new TV have a QAM tuner as well as an ATSC tuner?
If so, have you checked your settings to make sure it is using the QAM tuner?

An ATSC tuner is for OTA broadcasts, and a QAM tuner is used for cable signals.

From your post it seems there may be some confusion on your part about the difference between the two.
post #11590 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by earletp View Post

Does your new TV have a QAM tuner as well as an ATSC tuner? If so, have you checked your settings to make sure it is using the QAM tuner?

An ATSC tuner is for OTA broadcasts, and a QAM tuner is used for cable signals. From your post it seems there may be some confusion on your part about the difference between the two.

Yes, it has both. Yes, I was confused.

I am using the QAM tuner. My antenna is not hooked up. I receive my local channels in HD.

I wish I understood what Comcast is trying to achieve here. I understand they are freeing up the spectrum by getting rid of analog, but why can't I just watch the HD channels that I currently receive? I do not think they would intentionally force me back to SD if I use their service correctly.
post #11591 of 11976
The clear/local channels can have bizarro channel numbers so it may take a while to find them. If the cable company peeps are nice and or clueful they will have the mappings so that the channel number is the integer portion of the broadcast virtual channel #s well-known by viewers. (plus 0.1).

In addition to the HD/16:9 versions of all the locals, you should find a sequence of SD channels optimized for 4:3 TVs and the DTAs. These SD channels will look horrible on an HD/16:9 screen but OK on some NTSC sets, especially if connected via s-video or composite/baseband-video. The free DTAs do not connect via s-vid or baseband-vid, unfortunately.
post #11592 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdguru View Post

I cannot provide all the answers as we're on a Scientific Atlanta/Cisco based hardware system and I think you all in Virginia are on a Motorola based system; however, some things will be the same:

Your system probably still uses filters at the pole or junction box to keep you from receiving anything other than basic, analog signals. That's why they need to "remove something" so you can use the DTA

You'll install the DTA by connecting the incoming cable in your home to the DTA and the output of the DTA to your TV...

However, you will NOT be able to get HD via the current generation of DTA's, at least that's what occurs with the SA/Cisco DTA's. There will be a new generation of DTA's sometime in 2012 that will allow you to tune to local HD signals.

Hope this helps.

Not at all. As a matter of fact, misinformation is worse than no information.

Any Comcast video customer can get all the local HD they carry with a QAM tuner, which pretty much all HDTV's have these days. All you have to do is connect the coax directly into the HDTV and do a channel scan.

To use the DTA for standard definition cable channels and continue to get local HD via QAM, a splitter & A/B switch are used to go back and forth between the HDTV tuner, for QAM channels, and the DTA. http://customer.comcast.com/Pages/He...dapter-to-hdtv

Depending on what area you're in, the local HD channels in QAM may be on the same channel number as the over-the-air broadcast, or on another channel number assigned by Comcast. Once you see the difference between HD and SD, it shouldn't be too hard to know what channels are local HD. On occasion Comcast system maintenance causes QAM channel numbers to change and a re-scan of the HDTV tuner is required to view again.
post #11593 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

Any Comcast video customer can get all the local HD they carry with a QAM tuner, which pretty much all HDTV's have these days. All you have to do is connect the coax directly into the HDTV and do a channel scan.

To use the DTA for standard definition cable channels and continue to get local HD via QAM, a splitter & A/B switch are used to go back and forth between the HDTV tuner, for QAM channels, and the DTA. http://customer.comcast.com/Pages/He...dapter-to-hdtv

Ok, I understand and thanks for the link.

What I'm missing is - why is Comcast adding this DTA layer in people's houses? Is it so that they can add encryption to prevent theft?

From my point of view, all they need to do is stop using the analog and make everything digital (whether HD or SD). Spectrum saved, No DTA required.
post #11594 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by snash22 View Post

Ok, I understand and thanks for the link.

What I'm missing is - why is Comcast adding this DTA layer in people's houses? Is it so that they can add encryption to prevent theft?

Primarily, yes.

Quote:


From my point of view, all they need to do is stop using the analog and make everything digital (whether HD or SD). Spectrum saved, No DTA required.

If they didn't encrypt the signals, anyone with a QAM tuner (and access to their system) could receive all their channels without paying for them.
post #11595 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

If they didn't encrypt the signals, anyone with a QAM tuner (and access to their system) could receive all their channels without paying for them.

So how were they doing this prior to the DTA boxes? And why is the DTA better for them?

I feel like a 3 year old saying "why this, why that". I can adapt faster and sometimes more intelligently when I understand why a change is being made. Thanks for being patient
post #11596 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

I love your sig. I had 3 tech arguments with my wife last night. I'm not convinced it is better living, but I can never resist the upgrade
post #11597 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by snash22 View Post

So how were they doing this prior to the DTA boxes? And why is the DTA better for them?

I feel like a 3 year old saying "why this, why that". I can adapt faster and sometimes more intelligently when I understand why a change is being made. Thanks for being patient

They were doing it with filters (also known as traps) on the poles (the thing they are removing form your pole). Once the DTAs are in place, they can do everything from the office which in theory should save money.

Once the HD DTAs are available, I think most of the complaints will disappear (assuming they are free like the SD ones).
post #11598 of 11976
I believe they are free for one to two years, after that the DTA boxes can incur equipment rental charges. Also if you have a HD set with only a DVI input the current HD DTAs will not work with your set since the HD DTAs do not have an analog audio output. I filed a comment about this with the FCC and hopefully they will address this.
post #11599 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by BSTNFAN View Post

They were doing it with filters (also known as traps) on the poles (the thing they are removing form your pole). Once the DTAs are in place, they can do everything from the office which in theory should save money.

Once the HD DTAs are available, I think most of the complaints will disappear (assuming they are free like the SD ones).

And that's also making the assumption that they'll get all the channels in HD that the current SD DTAs get (old expanded basic + some extras). No one knows what the HD DTAs will be authorized for, and some cable industry folks over at dslreports claim it will not get all these channels in HD.

I don't think it makes much sense to have an HD DTA only for locals + junk channels in HD, but that's what they claim.
post #11600 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by snash22 View Post

OK, so I just need to find the delta between unscrambled QAM and what is on the DTA to see if it is worth it.

I suppose an unsubscribed TiVo HD be useable here instead of the VCR?

An unsubbed Tivo HD (or Premiere) would be perfect to get all your HD channels, but you will need to get a Cablecard from Comcast. Tivos work fine without a sub if all you want is an HD STB, and they'll quickly pay for themselves vs. renting one.
post #11601 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

And that's also making the assumption that they'll get all the channels in HD that the current SD DTAs get (old expanded basic + some extras). No one knows what the HD DTAs will be authorized for, and some cable industry folks over at dslreports claim it will not get all these channels in HD.

I don't think it makes much sense to have an HD DTA only for locals + junk channels in HD, but that's what they claim.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. I've read the claims, and in my opinion they are completely wrong. We shall see.
post #11602 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

And that's also making the assumption that they'll get all the channels in HD that the current SD DTAs get (old expanded basic + some extras). No one knows what the HD DTAs will be authorized for, and some cable industry folks over at dslreports claim it will not get all these channels in HD.

They could be expecting that based on the fact that you don't often (or ever - I don't know for sure - but I know it's at least common) get every last one of the expanded basic SD channels using an SD DTA, that you'd get using one of their full-fledged tuners.
post #11603 of 11976
Presuming a HD DTA could down convert to SD, then Comcast could remove all the SD channels to free up space, leaving just the HD ones. Everyone would need a box or DTA. Those with a SD TV would have the HD channels down-converted to SD.
post #11604 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morac View Post

Presuming a HD DTA could down convert to SD, then Comcast could remove all the SD channels to free up space, leaving just the HD ones. Everyone would need a box or DTA. Those with a SD TV would have the HD channels down-converted to SD.

Everyone already needs a box or DTA. The problem is that there are already a ton of SD DTAs out there, and you better believe Comcast won't pay to swap them all out at once. It'll happen eventually, but not any time soon.
post #11605 of 11976
Tennis Channel Wins Program Carriage Complaint Against Comcast

First Time a Network Has Prevailed in a Program Carriage Complaint Against Cable Operator

By John Eggerton -- Multichannel News, 12/20/2011 4:31:46 PM

An FCC Administrative Law Judge has ruled in favor of the Tennis Channel in its program carriage complaint against Comcast.

That is according to a copy of the decision by Administrative Law Judge Richard Sippel. The ruling marks the first time a network has prevailed in a program carriage complaint against a cable operator, and it should mean a big boost in the number of cable subs that can get the channel.

"It is concluded that Tennis Channel has satisfied its burden of proving that Comcast Cable engaged in discrimination in the selection, terms or conditions of carriage on the basis of its non-affiliation with Tennis channel," Sippel concluded.

Comcast will have to pay $375,000 and is prohibited from discriminating against Tennis vis-Ã*-vis Versus (NBC Sports Network as of Jan. 2) or Golf Channel, which Sippel determined were similarly situated, and which are affiliated with Comcast's NBCUniversal.

Tennis currently counts some 30 million subscribers, a total that includes 2.7 million with Comcast. The network's total with the nation's largest distributor could grow sevenfold from the ruling.
Among Sippel's key conclusions:

1. Tennis, Versus and Golf Channel were sufficiently similar--sports channels targeting similar audiences--that disparate treatment constituted discrimination.

2. Comcast's discrimination against Tennis Channel in favor of Golf Channel and Versus was based solely on affiliation. Comcast's explanations for that disparate treatment notwithstanding.

3. Carriage decisions by other MVPDs relative to Tennis to not justify Comcast's placement of the channel on a narrowly penetrated tier.

4. Comcast's disparate treatment unreasonably restrains the channel's ability to compete, including for program rights and what it can charge for advertising.

Sippel did not agree with Tennis Channel that its tier placement threatened its survival, but said that it did not have to show it would go under to show that Comcast had unreasonably restrained its ability to compete.

"This is a long-awaited day for Tennis Channel, and a watershed moment for independent programming networks and viewers who benefit from a true diversity of voices in the American media marketplace," said Ken Solomon,

chairman and CEO, Tennis Channel, in a statement. "Our request has been simple and clear since the beginning: we just want to be treated the same way major operators treat the networks they own that compete with us. From there we're prepared to succeed or fail based on a level playing field."

Sena Fitzmaurice, vice president, government communications, Comcast Corp., pointed out that the decision is still subject to review by the full commission and that it will take its case to an appeals court if necessary.

"We respectfully disagree with the initial decision that was released today in the FCC case involving Tennis Channel," said FitzMaurice.

"Comcast has the contractual right to distribute Tennis Channel as it does currently, and Comcast firmly believes that the exercise of that right to minimize costs to consumers is not discrimination. Many other companies with no ownership interest in Tennis Channel have made similar decisions and some refuse to carry Tennis Channel at all. Moreover, this decision purports to supersede an existing contract between two private parties, which is unprecedented in the program carriage context. The ruling issued today is only an initial decision, and is subject to further review by the full Commission and then, if needed, the U.S. Court of Appeals. We believe it is wrong for Tennis Channel to use the government to impose higher costs and prices on private enterprise and consumers and we look forward to the review process."

Tennis' complaint stems from Comcast's decision to keep the channel on a premium sports tier, rather than position it on a more broadly distributed programming package. Tennis had aruged that Comcast was favoring its own similarly situated networks Versus and Golf by placing them on more widely viewed tiers. Comcast had countered that Tennis was available to virtually every home it services, that its freely negotiated contract permits Tennis carrige on a sports package, and that was honoring those terms.

The FCC designated the complaint for hearing in Oct. 2010, with the Media Bureau concluding that, on its face, Tennis had made its case for discrimination.

Outside mediation of the complaint failed back in November. 2010, triggering the move of the complaint to Judge Sippel, the FCC's own legal Maytag repairman as the only administrative law judge at the commission, and one whose recent high-profile almost-decisions -- involving NFL Network and MASN, have been preempted by settlements between the parties, although he did rule against the carriage complaint of Wealth TV.

The FCC made some changes to its program carriage rules back in August to speed complaints, and allow for true-up payments or standstills, but those did not apply to complaints already in the pipeline.

Bloomberg, which has its own outstanding complaint against Comcast at the FCC, used the opportunity to try and light a fire under the commission. "Today's decision is further proof of what we already know, that Comcast abuses its dominant position against independent programmers like Bloomberg TV," said Greg Babyak, head of government relations for Bloomberg. "FCC Chairman Genachowski was right to require Comcast, as a condition of approving its acquisition of NBC-Universal, to include independent news channels such as Bloomberg TV where there are news neighborhoods. We urge the FCC to act on Bloomberg's complaint that Comcast is refusing to implement the news neighborhooding condition on the NBC-Universal acquisition."

http://www.multichannel.com/article/...st_Comcast.php
post #11606 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus Carr View Post

Comcast had countered that Tennis was available to virtually every home it services, that its freely negotiated contract permits Tennis carrige on a sports package, and that was honoring those terms.

If the contract Tennis Channel freely signed allows the channel to be placed in the sports pack, then this is all a bunch of crap. If you don't like the terms of a contract, don't agree to them!
post #11607 of 11976
So what happens now if Comcast chooses to drop Tennis Channel? Do they then get forced to carry it by some FCC judge?
post #11608 of 11976
post #11609 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by chitchatjf View Post

They may also want to require Digital Starter for the HD feeds of locals.

They "may"? Do you have a link for this? That would suck hard.

My version of "cord cutting" will involve maintaining a subscription for Limited Basic rather than using an antenna (and using TiVos to record), but that won't work if there's no HD.
post #11610 of 11976
Quote:
Originally Posted by aindik View Post

My version of "cord cutting" will involve maintaining a subscription for Limited Basic rather than using an antenna (and using TiVos to record), but that won't work if there's no HD.

Are you aware of the fact that it's impossible for Tivos to schedule recordings on digital/HD cable channels without a CableCARD?
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