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Silicon Optix Announces the Realta Chip -- Bringing Teranex's $60k HQV to the Home  

post #1 of 425
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Quote:
San Jose, Calif. (Sept 9, 2004) - Silicon Optix announces Realta™ with HQV™ technology, a powerful and fully programmable single-chip video processor that brings Teranex’s $60k Hollywood Quality Video to the home entertainment and professional large-area digital display markets.

“After three years of collaboration between Silicon Optix and Teranex, the highly anticipated end result is now unveiled,†said Paul Russo, chairman and CEO, Silicon Optix. “The Realta chip incorporates revolutionary technologies that will drive the next wave of digital video processing, and is targeted to set a new standard in video quality.â€

Teranex’s co-founder Jed Deame added “Realta’s HQV technology matches, and in many cases exceeds, the industry leading video processing seen in the $60k Teranex 3RU Xantus system, dramatically raising the bar for home theater picture quality.â€

The Realta chip combines Teranex’s trillion operation per second broadcast quality video processing with Silicon Optix’s proprietary geometric scaling technology to create a new standard for image quality, a standard Silicon Optix is calling “Hollywood Quality Videoâ€, or HQV.
HQV Powered by Teranex Has a Proven Reputation
Realta’s Hollywood Quality Video isn’t “just another video processorâ€. Its core technology includes Teranex’s software algorithms that have been refined through 100,000 hours of content verification over the past six years by hundreds of the most demanding customers world-wide – the “Golden Eyes†of Hollywood post production and broadcast including NBC, CBS, ABC, FOX, WB and Turner networks.

"We distribute content for 25 network feeds, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Where up-conversion is involved, it is important to us that it results in the highest possible image quality. After comparing the up-conversion results of equipment from a number of manufacturers we selected the Teranex product," said Ron Tarasoff, vice president, broadcast technology and engineering, Turner Entertainment Networks.

Teranex’s video processors are often referred to as the ‘â€dream system†by home theater enthusiasts, who say, “If I could afford it, I would buy it.â€

“With Realta’s HQV technology, consumers for the first time will be able to afford Teranex’s video processing excellence that the Hollywood community has enjoyed for years,†said Dennis Crespo, vice president of marketing, Silicon Optix. “As the Realta chip is integrated into home entertainment products the HQV logo will rapidly come to be synonymous with the very finest video display quality possible.â€

The Fully Programmable Advantage
Today’s hard-wired video processing chips attempt to support all types of displays with fixed “average†values and that consequently deliver “average†picture quality for all of them. Realta’s programmability allows consumer electronics (CE) manufacturers to keep pace with newly developed content and optimize image quality for different types of display technologies such as Plasma, LCD, DLP, HTPS, D-ILA and LCOS.

“By adding simple networking to consumer electronics products that use Realta processors, manufacturers can upgrade their user base with new image processing software, essentially future-proofing the image quality and compatibility of their products,†said Crespo.



Realta’s Hollywood Quality Video Processing includes:

-HQV True 1080i to 1080p/QXGA De-interlacing: Rather than discarding half the resolution of high-definition (HD) images as today’s image processors typically do, HQV technology uses the full four-field processing window for HD video de-interlacing and cadence detection, preserving the rich details in HD imagery.

-HQV SD/HD Multi-Direction Diagonal Filter (MDDF): A true 10-bit diagonal interpolator that removes any “jaggies†and/or stair-stepping artifacts from de-interlaced video sources without blurring the image.

-HQV Noise Reduction: A fully automatic per-pixel adaptive software algorithm that adds a new dimension of pixel-by-pixel noise and motion measurement, detecting and reducing the analog and MPEG noise that currently plagues DVD and broadcast sources while maintaining full image fidelity.

-HQV Detail Enhancement: Watching standard-definition (SD) images on HD displays often produces a blurring effect resulting in a disappointing visual experience. HQV detail enhancement improves the image detail on a pixel-by-pixel basis, delivering SD that approaches HD quality.

-HQV Automatic Film Mode Cadence Processing: A quantum improvement in automatic handling of film and video sources such as 3:2 and 2:2 sequences common to broadcast and DVD. HQV processing provides industry-first support for “Vari-Speed†cadences such as 3:2:3:2:2 commonly used for movies broadcast on television, as well as 5:5, 6:4, and 8:7, cadences used for the many different styles of animation. HQV cadence processing ensures that users will always be viewing film and video sources in the original format without loss of resolution. HQV technology is first to offer 3:2 insertion at HD, an important requirement of the new HD Blu-Ray™ and HD-DVD™ formats coming soon to the consumer market.

-HQV Automatic Per Pixel Video/Film Detection: Rather than making frame level decisions for video vs. film processing, typically causing severe artifacts to occur in sequences such as video titles and movie credits over film backgrounds, HQV delivers cinema-like quality by making pixel-level decisions, thus precisely processing film pixels as film and video pixels as video.

-HQV 16 to 1024-Tap Adaptive Scaling: Resolution up and down-scaling requires a large set of image samples to prevent the introduction of visually unacceptable artifacts. Realta delivers unprecedented image scaling quality by providing the industry’s first 16 to 1024-tap adaptive over-sampling scaling engine to maintain the highest image quality.

-True 10-Bit Processing: True to its professional heritage, Realta offers complete input to output 4:4:4 color processing and a full 10-bit or better internal data path, enabling the rendering of over 1 billion colors.

-Equal Quality Two Channel Processing: An industry first, the Realta’s powerful image processing engines can process two full resolution channels of HD or SD, enabling equal image quality for each video window in PIP, PAP, and POP modes.

-Optional eWARP-2â„¢ Geometry Processing: For applications requiring geometric correction, Realta’s proprietary pixel over-sampling eWARP-2 engine allows for AnyPlaceâ„¢ flexible projector placement (90H/60V) while maintaining the highest quality graphics, fine text, and crisp HD video.

About Silicon Optix:
Silicon Optix Inc, a privately held fabless semiconductor company, is the leading supplier of advanced video/image digital processing integrated circuits (ICs). The company’s products are driving three unique technologies into a broad range of markets: a patented, powerful, array-based programmable DSP for digital video, industry-leading software algorithms from Teranex and proprietary eWARP™ geometry processing. Its mission is to leverage these innovative technologies into ICs that will enable the next generation of digital video/image capture, transmission, distribution, editing, storage and display solutions, with an initial focus on large area digital displays including front and rear projection. Silicon Optix is headquartered in San Jose, California, with operations in Hannover, Germany; Orlando, Florida; Taipei, Taiwan and Toronto, Canada. For more information about Silicon Optix, please visit the company's Web site at http://www.siliconoptix.com.
post #2 of 425
(Insert Neo's reaction when he first sees Morpheus jump from building to building).
post #3 of 425
We definitely need more information on this at CEDIA. Pricing, availability, licensees, HDMI/HDCP (the website mentions only DVI), more info on the ImageAnyplace unit, etc.

One wonders how "affordable" this will turn out to be but it could be a huge success in this field. Given the true 1080p deinterlacing, a competitor to DCDi, color bit depth, variable cadence management, among its other features.

Cool news!

Cheers
post #4 of 425
Come to our launch party on Friday at the Omni hotel!

I've been working on this chip for three years now, its nice to be able to tell someone about it :D
post #5 of 425
BTW I can say that our chip does not have a DVI transmitter on it. That would be a function of the product it would be designed into. So, theres no reason HDCP would not be supported.

Also, the existing ImageAnyplace box does not use the Realta.
post #6 of 425
Come to our launch party on Friday at the Omni hotel!

I've been working on this chip for three years now, its nice to be able to tell someone about it :D
post #7 of 425
Holy cow!

How much would such a chip cost?

Will this chip be primarily for the broadcast market, or do you have plans for the HT market?

When should we expect products that will use this chip?
post #8 of 425
The chip is emphatically *not* designed to be broadcast-market exclusive. We fully expect it to be in consumer devices.
post #9 of 425
is video mode deinterlacing done through motion compensation?
post #10 of 425
Will Silicon optix be manufaturing a video processor incorporating this chip, if so when can we expect it on the market?
post #11 of 425
I was moving back to HTPC after reviewing video processors, but this looks like it may be woth holding off for.
post #12 of 425
Give us a box that beats the iScan HD both in quality and price! :D

regards,

Li On
post #13 of 425
Great news, finally something to compete with Genesis and SiL.
post #14 of 425
CEDIA attendees, head for the Omni, buttonhole our good buddy kromkamp, and get the scoop!! With the PCI interface this product could wind up on PC cards, Linux-based boxes and proprietary boxes, in addition to media control boxes and integrated displays.

Very cool, guys. Loved the web info; can't wait for more details.

I WANT MY REALTA NOW! *laughing*

Cheers
post #15 of 425
As I kinda introduced Teranex to the consumer world and got them into lots of press and shows I feel sorta proud at this new birth...

Im handing out cigars, even though it isn't really my baby
post #16 of 425
kromkamp,

Any wins yet for the Realta chip that you can talk about?
post #17 of 425
This sounds like one of those "disruptive technology" kinda things for the scaler market. Looks like I'm going to have to hold off a while longer to replace my Vigatec Dune!
post #18 of 425
Quote:
Originally posted by LMDA1
(Insert Neo's reaction when he first sees Morpheus jump from building to building).
Just came back from their CEDIA launch party. That pretty much describes it...

Lots of capabilities within the chip, a side by side comparison using Samsung HLP's (feeding 480i to one, which was deinterlaced and scaled internally with DCDi, and 720p, HQV processed) was dramatic. Kinda like comparing some crappy deinterlacer/scaler to the Faroudja. Now, this particular demo wasn't 100% fair, as they mucked with the image to 'degrade' it before feeding both sets (same image - it wasn't that unfair!) which probably gave the HQV a slight favor as it's strengths could be shown more dramatically... But, still, WOW!

[EDIT: My statement above about them mucking with the image appears to be inaccurate. Silicon Optix has posted later in this thread that the source material was not altered. My statement was based on a direct question/answer from the guy running the demo, and may have been a misunderstanding. It's more likely that the material was just 'imperfect' in its original form, and therefore it made for a good demo. As opposed to them making it worse than the original in order to show off the capabilities. I have no reason to dispute Dennis' reply. ]

They also showed a small projector at a 40-degree off-axis position using their keystone correction - I didn't see any real distortion on the image, maybe just a slight skew in one corner (which could probably have been fixed if they tweeked the position more accurately).

[EDIT: Oh, I didn't mention the side by side demo using two 720p front projectors, one using a D-VHS 1080i video, the other using a DVD of the same film running through the HQV. The upconverted DVD looked WOW! significantly better in color depth than the 1080i source... Perhaps not as much detail in the dark areas, but geez, they're working from a lot fewer pixels...]

There were suggestions that the HQV chip could show up in $1500 processors. BOOM! That would certainly change a few things!

I'll let the video experts describe more of the details - but you should probably write the HQV letters at the top of the requirements for your next processor.

Jeff
post #19 of 425
When can we expect to see products with their chips? I'm really excited because I just purchase a marquee 9000 (soon to be modified to the hilt) and until now I could only dream about owning a Teranex quality scaler.
post #20 of 425
Can't wait to see who picks this chip up first for their scalers!
post #21 of 425
Silicon Optix guys said to look for announcements at CES in January...
post #22 of 425
I don't have much time because I'm still at Cedia, but I just wanted to clarify a few things about the Realta Chip.

1) This is not the P4K chip that Teranex uses in their products now. This chip was started before the P4k in late 2001. Teranex was looking for scaling technology and Silicon Optix was looking for video processing technology. So both companies formed a partnership to take the Teranex Xantus 3RU feature-set and put it on a single-chip targeted at the Consumer market. The P4K is used only in the current generation of Teranex Broadcast and Post Production products.

2) Silicon Optix does not publish the pricing of its chips, but I can say that the Realta will be in systems products that sell for $1500-$30K.

3) It has been posted that some of our demos may have had some content that was engineered to make other chips look bad. All the content that was used in our demos was donated by the Post Production and Broadcast community. This content is on commercially available DVDs. Silicon Optix will be distributing a benchmark DVD with that content on it at CES and it will be available on our website soon.

4) To ensure that all of our Side-by-side demos were done correctly and fairly we retained Peter Putman, a well know expert, to calibrate and setup each display. So it's true, when one compares the HQV quality versus others technologies side-by-side we really do look that good, which can generate some disbelief. In the coming months you will be able to that testing for yourself.

Thanks for everyone interest and I'll do my best to keep you all posted with new infomation when it becomes public.

Dennis Crespo
VP of Marketing and Systems Engineering
Silicon Optix, Inc
post #23 of 425
Dennis,

Excellent work, we can't wait to see who'se picking your chips up for production scalers!
post #24 of 425
Quote:
Originally posted by dcrespo
3) It has been posted that some of our demos may have had some content that was engineered to make other chips look bad. All the content that was used in our demos was donated by the Post Production and Broadcast community. This content is on commercially available DVDs. Silicon Optix will be distributing a benchmark DVD with that content on it at CES and it will be available on our website soon.

4) To ensure that all of our Side-by-side demos were done correctly and fairly we retained Peter Putman, a well know expert, to calibrate and setup each display. So it's true, when one compares the HQV quality versus others technologies side-by-side we really do look that good, which can generate some disbelief. In the coming months you will be able to that testing for yourself.
Dennis, I assume you're talking about my statement... :D

I will edit my previous post to reflect your comments, but my statement was the result of me asking direct questions of the Silicon Optix personnel running the demo (the 480i demo near the keystone demo). It's possible that I misunderstood his response, or he misunderstood my question. I asked if both sets were being fed the same signal, which he confirmed (one processed by HQV, the other not). But he said the source material was "degraded" to show off the capabilities of the chip - not an exact quote, but that's the message.

Now, what he may have meant was that the source material was not ideal, and therefore made for a good demo, not that anyone had muddied up the material on purpose. Regardless, the same material was definitely being sent to both displays, that's why I said it was 'unfair' as opposed to 'cheating'.

But since my comments were based only on the information from the Silicon Optix rep, not by any observation I could make, or other knowledge of the setup - I have no basis to make any argument on this matter. If you say the material was unaltered from whatever is available, then I'll take your word.

Regardless, there's certainly nothing wrong with the way the demo was presented. If this was a off-road vehicle demonstration, and your vehicle could clear an obstacle 1" higher than the competition, putting an obstacle .5" below your maximum is just showing off your capabilities. Now, does that compare in the real world? Well, maybe...

Just to be clear - I was not accusing anyone of doing anything wrong, and my information was based solely on statements from Silicon Optix personnel. If that information was inaccurate, or mis-interpreted, I have no reason to question the demo(s). And more importantly for all of us here, ALL of the demos were extremely impressive! The fact that they were presented with available source material makes it even more impressive - as we'll be able to compare for ourselves.

Jeff
post #25 of 425
Well I went to the party. This chip will change our (this forum's) world. Algolith stated that they would have a $3500 product out incorporating this chip. A 1080p processor with Algolith. Silicon Optix hopes this chip will be picked up by one of the big boys (such as Sony). Any of the smaller processor manufacturers will be dead if they do not go with this chip. It is that good. The present consumer boxes from Silicon Optix do not use the chip. Look for a $2K to $3K product from them using it in less than a year. There is a board design already and it is available to manufacturers who buy the chip. I have learned (from outside Silicon Optix) that the chip is being offered to the small guys at about $300 per chip. Silicon Optix really does not want to be in the processor box market. They want to be a TI and sell chips and help with the designof companies processors. Look for one of our frequent contributors to be OEMing boards with the chip. To me, this chip was the biggest thing at the show. A Teranex for about $3K. WOW. I want one now. Watch my words become true. This is like knowing that this 10 you have been dating for a while is ready to go to bed with you and that she will be a 10 there too. No a 10 plus there.

I guess you could say Marky likes it.
post #26 of 425
Mark,

Who is Algorith? Are you talking about Algolith maybe?

I know you were really aching for a motion compensated deinterlacing algorithm - so now you have (or rather, almost have) what you wished for.
post #27 of 425
Indeed it is Algolith, the product will be called "Dragonfly" those of you who have purchased a Mosquito may have noticed the name on your card board box. We expect to have the unit deliverable by Q2 2005 at the latest, and should list it at around 3500$. This is extremely preliminary, we barely made it to the show with a couple of prototypes. People at the Silicon Optix party and in our booth on Saturday and Sunday were able to see a Mosquito Dragon Fly combo, everyone was impressed with the Picture Quality (PQ).
post #28 of 425
Ofer. I edited the spelling in my post. Sorry. I think everyone including the company and you can cut me a spelling break! Every one knows who I mean. The show was very tiring but great fun and I do not mean from a partying means. I didn't even get to the AVS party. No time, there was so much to see just at the show site, and I mean the Cedia show, not "the show" show. I barely got to "the show", a small audio show site. Hell, I missed the Lumagen booth, and I really love those guys.
post #29 of 425
Quote:
Originally posted by Algolith
Indeed it is Algolith, the product will be called "Dragonfly" those of you who have purchased a Mosquito may have noticed the name on your card board box. We expect to have the unit deliverable by Q2 2005 at the latest, and should list it at around 3500$. This is extremely preliminary, we barely made it to the show with a couple of prototypes. People at the Silicon Optix party and in our booth on Saturday and Sunday were able to see a Mosquito Dragon Fly combo, everyone was impressed with the Picture Quality (PQ).
Will "Dragonfly" have the Mosquito noise reduction as well as a full scaler using the Silicon Optix chip???
post #30 of 425
How does this chip compare with the new VXP chip from Gennum?

http://www.gennum.com/ip/index.html
http://www.gennum.com/ip/applications/application5.htm
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