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Build You Own (BYO) TV Stand - Page 46

post #1351 of 1400
Long time lurker here. Having read through various builds, I am ready to plunge into building a DIY 8020 stand to fit some equipment whose size is beyond what I can fit inside the 'commercial' racks. I am thinking of getting some furniture grade cherry plywood panels cut to dimension (and edge routed) at a local woodshop. The 8020 itself may be custom ordered through the local distributor since we would like to get them in anodized black.

One question:

The Side panels -- how do you dimension them (thickness) so that they fit inside the 8020 groove? Standard plywood thickness seem to be either too thick or too thin to fit in the clearance without 'wobbling'. Do I need to purchase the silicone gasket that 8020 sells to keep it from being 'wobbly' ?
post #1352 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtnryn View Post

Long time lurker here. Having read through various builds, I am ready to plunge into building a DIY 8020 stand to fit some equipment whose size is beyond what I can fit inside the 'commercial' racks. I am thinking of getting some furniture grade cherry plywood panels cut to dimension (and edge routed) at a local woodshop. The 8020 itself may be custom ordered through the local distributor since we would like to get them in anodized black.

One question:

The Side panels -- how do you dimension them (thickness) so that they fit inside the 8020 groove? Standard plywood thickness seem to be either too thick or too thin to fit in the clearance without 'wobbling'. Do I need to purchase the silicone gasket that 8020 sells to keep it from being 'wobbly' ?

You can cut a dado on a tablesaw or with a router. If you're not handy or con't have the equipment, the woodshop you referred to should be able to take care of it.

Just make sure you know your final dimensions before cutting anything. smile.gif
post #1353 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtnryn View Post

Long time lurker here. Having read through various builds, I am ready to plunge into building a DIY 8020 stand to fit some equipment whose size is beyond what I can fit inside the 'commercial' racks. I am thinking of getting some furniture grade cherry plywood panels cut to dimension (and edge routed) at a local woodshop. The 8020 itself may be custom ordered through the local distributor since we would like to get them in anodized black.

One question:

The Side panels -- how do you dimension them (thickness) so that they fit inside the 8020 groove? Standard plywood thickness seem to be either too thick or too thin to fit in the clearance without 'wobbling'. Do I need to purchase the silicone gasket that 8020 sells to keep it from being 'wobbly' ?

You can't edge route plywood and dados are made to fit tightly plywood is either 3/4" or 23/32" thick.
post #1354 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

You can't edge route plywood and dados are made to fit tightly plywood is either 3/4" or 23/32" thick.

I meant so say cut a rabbet on the edge, and yes, you can do that on plywood if you have a quality dado blade, or rabbeting bit for your router, though you need to take care either way, and a router table is a lot safer than hand held.
post #1355 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonhawk View Post

I meant so say cut a rabbet on the edge, and yes, you can do that on plywood if you have a quality dado blade, or rabbeting bit for your router, though you need to take care either way, and a router table is a lot safer than hand held.

Edge routing and a rabbit are two totally different things and as far as routing on a table or handheld or dado blade that depends on several factors, safety not being one of them. If you know how to use your power tools safety becomes second nature no matter how you use them.
post #1356 of 1400
I wouldn't want to edge rout a rabbit, that's for sure. rolleyes.gif

Talk about safety issues... eek.gif

Poor little thing.... biggrin.gif
post #1357 of 1400
Thanks for pitching in. I suspect I am going to try the silicone gasket first to see if that will give a decent fit, before attempting dadoing the edge.
. Will post my experience when I have made some progress.
post #1358 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by cr136124 View Post

Welcome to the party!
It is a Panasonic PT-AE8000U. And what you are seeing in those pics is actually not making any justice to this projector/screen combo.

2D is amazing and 3D is pretty good overall. Really happy with this "my first" projector........biggrin.gif

It's been awhile and I'm sorry I missed cr's original post on his new screen/projector. Looks great.

My projector crapped out and I'm in a bit of a holding pattern before pulling the trigger on a new projector. Background is.... I actually dropped my pj years ago, but mashed it back together and got several years out of it, but now I'm probably going with the AE8000 when I get the green light. I told my wife (or at least she listened to me) that I had to have it prior to football season.
Edited by billybobg - 6/13/13 at 12:04pm
post #1359 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybobg View Post

It's been awhile and I'm sorry I missed cr's original post on his new screen/projector. Looks great.

My projector crapped out and I'm in a bit of a holding pattern before pulling the trigger on a new projector. Background is.... I actually dropped my pj years ago, but mashed it back together and got several years out of it, but now I'm probably going with the AE8000 when I get the green light. I told my wife (or at least she listened to me) that I had to have it prior to football season.

And you know that football season starts with training camp.......right?

In other words you have like one month and two weeks to have the Panny at home.......................wink.gif
post #1360 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by cr136124 View Post

And you know that football season starts with training camp.......right?

In other words you have like one month and two weeks to have the Panny at home.......................wink.gif

I'll show my wife your post. I'm SURE she'll jump on the bandwage at that point smile.gif
post #1361 of 1400
Looking at starting a stand of my own. I really like the Salamander Designs Synergy, but not the price tag. The Synergy is also too shallow for my needs. I have a Sony 400 Disc DVD that is very deep, along with an Onkyo NR3009 and Emotiva XPA-2. These are impossible to find cabinets for. I also want to be able to add components and be able to support the already 200+ lbs of amps and receivers. Hard to find that in an affordable stand.

Drew this up in MS PowerPoint and may just dive in once I mull it over in my mind long enough. Still not sure whether to put in wood sides on the outside or mesh. Also wondering about a back panel of sorts.

post #1362 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by climber07 View Post

Looking at starting a stand of my own. I really like the Salamander Designs Synergy, but not the price tag. The Synergy is also too shallow for my needs. I have a Sony 400 Disc DVD that is very deep, along with an Onkyo NR3009 and Emotiva XPA-2. These are impossible to find cabinets for. I also want to be able to add components and be able to support the already 200+ lbs of amps and receivers. Hard to find that in an affordable stand.

Drew this up in MS PowerPoint and may just dive in once I mull it over in my mind long enough. Still not sure whether to put in wood sides on the outside or mesh. Also wondering about a back panel of sorts.

You can buy extended rear panels for the Synergy cabinets that give you an additional 3.5" of depth. The other option is if you don't need a back to the stand you can just use the stand without a rear panel at all since it isn't necessary to the stability of the cabinet.
post #1363 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salamander Jim View Post

You can buy extended rear panels for the Synergy cabinets that give you an additional 3.5" of depth. The other option is if you don't need a back to the stand you can just use the stand without a rear panel at all since it isn't necessary to the stability of the cabinet.
None of that helps if the shelf isn't deep enough for the feet of the component to all sit on the shelf smile.gif.
post #1364 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsr View Post

None of that helps if the shelf isn't deep enough for the feet of the component to all sit on the shelf smile.gif.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salamander Jim View Post

You can buy extended rear panels for the Synergy cabinets that give you an additional 3.5" of depth. The other option is if you don't need a back to the stand you can just use the stand without a rear panel at all since it isn't necessary to the stability of the cabinet.

It's mostly the $2500 price tag for the Synergy. I was also thinking of using maple 1x2 boards and making a butcher block style top and bottom stained in ebony. Talk about strong!
post #1365 of 1400
Hello,

After finally getting fed up using a coffee table (without a shelf) I think its time to attempt my own stand.

First things first, heres my vision (so sorry for pic), using wood for top, bottom and centre speaker shelf. Using thread for the corners and the centre speaker

stand.png 29k .png file

My inspiration is from these:

tv stand.jpg 364k .jpg file

flexy_corner.jpg 344k .jpg file


Now my main concern is if the design is feesable!? the tv weighs 26kg, and the centre speaker (to be hung from top wood) weighs (hmmm cant find weight, its a Wharfedale 9CS and weighs a lot).

I can get my hands on some free MDF, but am not sure if it is up to the job (may have to change design). The wood is 105cm x 40.5cm x 2cm thick. My other concern with the wood is the depth as the tv stand is 34cm.
If too risky then I would have to consider buying materials (very expensive in New Zealand). Could someone please advise what type of wood (thickness etc) would be needed?

Many thanks
post #1366 of 1400
For people who are adding wire chase holes to the back, what size holes are you drilling? I'm thinking 2-2.5" in diameter should be just about right. I put 3" holes in the back of our current TV stand (IKEA Besta), but those seem a little too big.

Edit: 2-3/8" seems to be the Goldilocks size---just right.
Edited by matteroffact - 8/6/13 at 4:44pm
post #1367 of 1400
I ended up using a gel stain to control this. I used Tung oil for the final finish and it came out very nice. jUCq
post #1368 of 1400
Has anyone here drawn up a design and taken it to a woodworker to have it built? If so, was it any cheaper than just buying one of these overpriced entertainment stands?
post #1369 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by pappaduke View Post

Has anyone here drawn up a design and taken it to a woodworker to have it built? If so, was it any cheaper than just buying one of these overpriced entertainment stands?

I recommend making a sketch and taking it to several shops and requesting a quote. Be specific, ask for references and hopefully be able to visit and look at previous works. Most shops will, at a minimum, keep an album of prior work.

I agree with your opinion on what passes for entertainment furniture now days. Most are just very simple and unimpressive. They seldom match any other decor in your house. I doubt custom will be cheaper, but it can be exactly what you want and of higher quality.

How much it will cost really comes down to how hungry the wood worker is. Material choice will play a part, but the costs include his time and the payoff of his investment in tools and his shop. Most cabinets are just boxes with other boxes and shelves inside. Doors and hardware add up if you want components enclosed.

I built my units. If I had to pay myself for the time I would have had to pay thousands. Having said that, I did have a bathroom remodeled a couple of years back. I got a bid from a custom shop and then did a lot of research into the modular stuff. Turned out that the custom shop was about 20% less with quality far and above better. My contribution was making shoji type sliding doors for the closets which, again, would have really driven up the overall costs had I paid the cabinet maker.
post #1370 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by matteroffact View Post

For people who are adding wire chase holes to the back, what size holes are you drilling? I'm thinking 2-2.5" in diameter should be just about right. I put 3" holes in the back of our current TV stand (IKEA Besta), but those seem a little too big.

Edit: 2-3/8" seems to be the Goldilocks size---just right.

If they don't affect the structural integrity of the back, then I don't see the size being an issue. Being behind a tv they wouldn't show anyway and I like not having to fiddle to much getting access.
post #1371 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by cr136124 View Post

And you know that football season starts with training camp.......right?

In other words you have like one month and two weeks to have the Panny at home.......................wink.gif

Got the Panny. Life is good smile.gif Wife caved when her son said he was coming with the grandkids and expected to be able to watch movies.

Utes play tomorrow night. Go Utes!
post #1372 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybobg View Post

Got the Panny. Life is good smile.gif Wife caved when her son said he was coming with the grandkids and expected to be able to watch movies.

Utes play tomorrow night. Go Utes!


Score!!!!!


Congrats on the Panny. So, how big is the screen that you are using? 16:9 or 2.35:1 AR?

Tell me, tell me...........tongue.gif
post #1373 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by cr136124 View Post

Score!!!!!


Congrats on the Panny. So, how big is the screen that you are using? 16:9 or 2.35:1 AR?

Tell me, tell me...........tongue.gif

117" 16:9. Mind you, that's the HT, not the family room with the 47" with the cabinet.

The HT (rough pics, I need some new ones of the completed room) with the old LG can be seen at : http://www.avsforum.com/t/1259060/time-to-start-paintin/30
Edited by billybobg - 8/28/13 at 12:44pm
post #1374 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybobg View Post

I recommend making a sketch and taking it to several shops and requesting a quote. Be specific, ask for references and hopefully be able to visit and look at previous works. Most shops will, at a minimum, keep an album of prior work.

I agree with your opinion on what passes for entertainment furniture now days. Most are just very simple and unimpressive. They seldom match any other decor in your house. I doubt custom will be cheaper, but it can be exactly what you want and of higher quality.

How much it will cost really comes down to how hungry the wood worker is. Material choice will play a part, but the costs include his time and the payoff of his investment in tools and his shop. Most cabinets are just boxes with other boxes and shelves inside. Doors and hardware add up if you want components enclosed.

I built my units. If I had to pay myself for the time I would have had to pay thousands. Having said that, I did have a bathroom remodeled a couple of years back. I got a bid from a custom shop and then did a lot of research into the modular stuff. Turned out that the custom shop was about 20% less with quality far and above better. My contribution was making shoji type sliding doors for the closets which, again, would have really driven up the overall costs had I paid the cabinet maker.
I'm not much of a craftsman, so building myself will be a last resort. As long as pricing isn't astronomical I'll be willing to pay for what I want. Going by a few shops today with a rough sketch. Why pay a lot for prefabricated if its not what I want.
post #1375 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybobg View Post

I recommend making a sketch and taking it to several shops and requesting a quote. Be specific, ask for references and hopefully be able to visit and look at previous works. Most shops will, at a minimum, keep an album of prior work.

I agree with your opinion on what passes for entertainment furniture now days. Most are just very simple and unimpressive. They seldom match any other decor in your house. I doubt custom will be cheaper, but it can be exactly what you want and of higher quality.

How much it will cost really comes down to how hungry the wood worker is. Material choice will play a part, but the costs include his time and the payoff of his investment in tools and his shop. Most cabinets are just boxes with other boxes and shelves inside. Doors and hardware add up if you want components enclosed.

I built my units. If I had to pay myself for the time I would have had to pay thousands. Having said that, I did have a bathroom remodeled a couple of years back. I got a bid from a custom shop and then did a lot of research into the modular stuff. Turned out that the custom shop was about 20% less with quality far and above better. My contribution was making shoji type sliding doors for the closets which, again, would have really driven up the overall costs had I paid the cabinet maker.
Took my sketch to a woodworking shop. I got two quotes for my design. $650 + tax if I use melamine (a type of particle board), or $950 + tax if I use cherry wood. I can live with the pricing, but does anyone know anything about this melamine? The samples I was shown looked very nice with various finishes. I'm just concerned about durability.
post #1376 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by pappaduke View Post

Took my sketch to a woodworking shop. I got two quotes for my design. $650 + tax if I use melamine (a type of particle board), or $950 + tax if I use cherry wood. I can live with the pricing, but does anyone know anything about this melamine? The samples I was shown looked very nice with various finishes. I'm just concerned about durability.

My $.02. The durability of melamine has a lot to do with the density of the core material. If you've ever failed at assembling IKEA furniture with a joint that was stressed before you got the total unit assembled, you'll understand. Once assembled it will be fine which is what you should get from a custom builder. The builder should be able to tell you what the core material is (low, medium, high density), but he also might just say that's how it comes, take it or leave it. Particle board is also very heavy so consider that if you have to move it. One of the reasons I passed up on modular cabinets was that the core fibreboard was low density. Any flexing on the joints and it will break. Wood is more forgiving and lighter. $300 upper for cherry is not out of line. Good luck.
post #1377 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybobg View Post

My $.02. The durability of melamine has a lot to do with the density of the core material. If you've ever failed at assembling IKEA furniture with a joint that was stressed before you got the total unit assembled, you'll understand. Once assembled it will be fine which is what you should get from a custom builder. The builder should be able to tell you what the core material is (low, medium, high density), but he also might just say that's how it comes, take it or leave it. Particle board is also very heavy so consider that if you have to move it. One of the reasons I passed up on modular cabinets was that the core fibreboard was low density. Any flexing on the joints and it will break. Wood is more forgiving and lighter. $300 upper for cherry is not out of line. Good luck.
That's good info, thank you. I also thought about the weight issue. While I don't plan on moving anywhere, the durability of wood is probably a better idea. After looking at the prices of BDI, Sanus, Bell'o, etc..., if I can come in around $1000 I think I'm doing good. Especially since it will be built to my specifications. Thanks for your $.02. If anyone else has opinions about melamine, I'd love to here it.
post #1378 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by pappaduke View Post

Took my sketch to a woodworking shop. I got two quotes for my design. $650 + tax if I use melamine (a type of particle board), or $950 + tax if I use cherry wood. I can live with the pricing, but does anyone know anything about this melamine? The samples I was shown looked very nice with various finishes. I'm just concerned about durability.

Forget the melamine, go with the cherry plywood and solid cherry for any trim and edging. Melamine veneer in itself is very durable, the concern is the substrate, (MDF or particle board) it's applied over and all the edges. So much of today's furniture, cabinets, etc. is made with particle board and MDF most of it is basically junk. In my opinion melamine can look very cheap.
post #1379 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

Forget the melamine, go with the cherry plywood and solid cherry for any trim and edging. Melamine veneer in itself is very durable, the concern is the substrate, (MDF or particle board) it's applied over and all the edges. So much of today's furniture, cabinets, etc. is made with particle board and MDF most of it is basically junk. In my opinion melamine can look very cheap.
I'm leaning heavily in the direction of the cherry plywood. It may cost more, but sometimes you truly get what you pay for. I think the difference between real wood and melamine is an example of that. Thanks for your input.
post #1380 of 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by climber07 View Post

Looking at starting a stand of my own. I really like the Salamander Designs Synergy, but not the price tag. The Synergy is also too shallow for my needs. I have a Sony 400 Disc DVD that is very deep, along with an Onkyo NR3009 and Emotiva XPA-2. These are impossible to find cabinets for. I also want to be able to add components and be able to support the already 200+ lbs of amps and receivers. Hard to find that in an affordable stand.

Drew this up in MS PowerPoint and may just dive in once I mull it over in my mind long enough. Still not sure whether to put in wood sides on the outside or mesh. Also wondering about a back panel of sorts.

I dig the design. I am looking to build something very similar. What's your source for the mesh?

I can't seem to get my hands on any without ordering off the web, which can be confusing on which type to order (different gauges).
My thoughts are to simply use the mesh panels in place of the doors via small magnets in the 80/20 frame. But I'm not sure how that would actually look.
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