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Charlotte, NC - OTA - Page 239

post #7141 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by jspENC View Post

Gale, I bet the balun on the old antenna probably has water in it. That will kill reception. When you install the new antenna, make sure you tape up with electrical tape or use the liquid sealant on the fittings to keep any moisture out and you will be set for many years of good service. Also don't forget the "drip loops"!
Her Winegard 8200 has a balun box rather than a matching transformer. I think it may be a circuit board design. So water damage could cause a short and indeed block reception. But you can order a replacement balun box from Winegard or possibly Solid Signal. But I forget the exact part number. Would be worth replacing. As that 8200 could also be used as an FM radio antenna.
post #7142 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post


For sake of discussion, let's imagine a local affiliate WZZZ of a broadcast network, EBC.

1 I assume that any ad time that WZZZ sells during one of its locally produced shows, such as the local newscast stays at the station.

2What about ad time during the broadcast of a network show? Does WZZZ get to keep any of that time, or does it have to turn all of that time over to EBC as payment for the programming that EBC is providing to the station?

3And let's suppose that WZZZ reaches a retransmission consent deal with a cable company called CableCorp.
Is CableCorp required to retransmit WZZZ's signal intact, including the ads that appear in the OTA broadcast, or can CableCorp sell its own ad time during those commercial breaks?

4However things work, I would assume that the ad rates that advertisers would be willing to pay would depend on the total viewership, OTA viewers along with viewers via satellite or cable.

As far as I know:
1 Yes this is why news is done on TV, it's a big profit center.

2 The networks have time in the shows for local commercial breaks. Plus they pay the station to be an affiliate usually based on market size and how desirable a station might be. They used to show what the network compensation was to the affiliate in the Broadcasting Yearbook. I haven't seen that information in a long time.

3 I haven't seen a cable company try to insert anything in a TV station's feed so it's probably not allowed.

4 Ad rates are based on ratings so yes total viewership which is why local stations get all upset when they can't get an agreement with a cable company.... it can cause them to lose viewers! The cable companies don't like it much either since they have to answer to subscribers!
post #7143 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by W4DXL View Post

I haven't seen a cable company try to insert anything in a TV station's feed so it's probably not allowed.

You are correct, typically it is not done. However, there is one MVPD that is installing equipment at some major market stations (including here) that will allow the OTA spot to be covered on their system with another spot delivered to the MVPD in a seperate fiber feed.
post #7144 of 7640
This is interesting, From geeks are sexy:


North Carolina city councilman David Waddell sent his resignation letter to Mayor Michael Alvarez penned in the Klingon language of plqaD.



Waddell, a plumber by trade and a Star Trek fan, used the Bing.com Klingon translator, ending the letter with “chaq DaHjaj QaQ jaj paj,” which means “maybe today is a good day (to) resign.”

”Folks don’t know what to think of me half the time,” Waddell told The Charlotte Observer. “So I might as well have one last laugh.”

letter




According to the USA Today, Mayor Alvarez wasn’t amused, saying “It’s an embarrassment for Indian Trail , and it’s an embarrassment for North Carolina,”

Waddell’s resignation takes effect on January 31, nearly two years early.

According to The Charlotte Observer, “Waddell left his post early because he was frustrated with how citizens’ requests for public information were addressed.”
post #7145 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post

OK, let's try to keep this forum from degenerating into a debate on political philosophies.

Agreed..That and off-topic subjects that have nothing to do with Local HDTV Info and Reception-Charlotte NC OTA. rolleyes.gif
post #7146 of 7640
Yeah, let's stick to discussions a little more related to the topic, if you don't mind. We have other threads for the Aereo discussion. Though not one for the use of Klingon in government correspondence. But I'm sure there's a forum somewhere that does. biggrin.gif
post #7147 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

It's a little pricey but IMO, a good coax crimping tool and stripper are well worth the money if you are going to be working with coax much. You can put on close to professional quality connectors and you can make your own cables to length. It's the same reason that I own a pair of these for ethernet cable too. Then you can just buy a spool of cable of either type to use as needed. If you fool with cabling much, this way turns out to be much less money.

I thought I'd start with this point you made, blackcap, as I got this compression tool: "Snap-N-Seal" Compression Connector Installation Tool (Thomas & Betts). It's for RG-59 and RG-6/6QS, which I think is designed to go with the Snap-N-Seal RG 6 compression fittings with o-rings. I've also got Permatex Dielectric grease. I hope that whatever I put on will be better than what was on the RCA coax I had.
post #7148 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

On your question about the ground. There are two types of grounds specified for an antenna.
  1. There is a ground for your mast and non-active elements on the antenna. This ground can be connected to it's own grounding rod somewhere near the mast. It must not be bonded to the house ground. It sounds as if you have this already.
  2. There is also a ground that connects to the shield on the coax. This is accomplished by what is called a grounding block that bolts to the side of the house. Usually your antenna coax screws into one side and then the coax that goes inside screws to the other. This block must only be bonded to the house ground. Don't connect it to anything else like another grounding rod as this will cause a ground loop. If the house grounding rod is near there, then you can just connect it to that rod.

When you connect your antenna to the receiver the shield is grounded anyway via the power connection in the unit. The only purpose for #2 is to keep potential static buildup from being shunted through your receiver. The static is generated by wind passing over the antenna. Some say it gives lightening protection, but I'm dubious of that aspect of it.


The thing about antennas is this. You might find a lot of antennas that can receive what you want when the weather is nice and calm. The trick is to find an antenna that works when it's raining and the wind is blowing hard or something else changes throughout the year. This becomes more important when the station is at the fringes and far away.

Okay -grounding. Yes, I think I am set up for the main antenna grounding.

But, for the grounding block that the antenna screws into, and that the in-house part part exits the house and connects to - I think I have that, but I don't know that it is set up properly.

I mentioned somewhere up-thread that there was a piece of RG59 running from the TV through the house wall to the outside that I am going to replace with RG6. The existing cable terminates at what may well be the grounding block. What I have is a metal thing that looks like a specialized bracket, with a smaller dimension copper wire connected to it, and then the inside and outside cables connect right about there where they pass through this bracket. The copper wire attached to it connects to a smaller in-ground rod. It also has two places where screws could hold the bracket to something, but the bracket is hanging loose (cables running through it and copper ground connected to it and grounded.)

Two questions:
1. Do I want a connection at that bracket/grounding block? (And a photo would probably be worth a thousand words on this one. Sorry I don't have one to post yet!) Or, do I want the new RG-6 to simply run through that bracket so there is one less connection in the system?
2. Sounds like I need to bolt the bracket/grounding block to the house. Is this correct? Could I strap it to the (heavy plastic) downspout?

Thanks!
post #7149 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by jspENC View Post

Gale, I bet the balun on the old antenna probably has water in it. That will kill reception. When you install the new antenna, make sure you tape up with electrical tape or use the liquid sealant on the fittings to keep any moisture out and you will be set for many years of good service. Also don't forget the "drip loops"!

It may not have leaked because it has electrical tape on it now. That said, which is better to keep out water, the electrical tape or liquid sealant? And if it's liquid sealant, do you mean something like a bead of silicone, or something else that would be better? And if electrical tape is the best, do you mean just the normal kind I have around here in abundance?

(I haven't unscrewed the DB8's box yet to see how it is designed to prevent water intrusion, or even if it is water proofed at all. Don't have the 91XG yet, but that box is probably the same as it comes from Antennas Direct, too.)
post #7150 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerSC View Post

Her Winegard 8200 has a balun box rather than a matching transformer. I think it may be a circuit board design. So water damage could cause a short and indeed block reception. But you can order a replacement balun box from Winegard or possibly Solid Signal. But I forget the exact part number. Would be worth replacing. As that 8200 could also be used as an FM radio antenna.

Interesting! The Winegard currently does pick up loads of FM. We tend not to use FM there, out of habit, I guess. Great point, and good food for thought.
post #7151 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayle28607 View Post

......
Two questions:
1. Do I want a connection at that bracket/grounding block? (And a photo would probably be worth a thousand words on this one. Sorry I don't have one to post yet!) Or, do I want the new RG-6 to simply run through that bracket so there is one less connection in the system?
2. Sounds like I need to bolt the bracket/grounding block to the house. Is this correct? Could I strap it to the (heavy plastic) downspout?

Thanks!

I'm having a little trouble understanding what you are saying so a photo would help. The grounding block can be mounted anywhere stable, preferably where it won't get wet. However as I stated above there should not be an independent ground rod for it. This is because when you connect your cable to the receiver, you create two ground points for the house. This can cause something called a ground loop which can cause all kinds of issues with your equipment. It can even be dangerous is there is an issue elsewhere in your house wiring. It's best not to have one rather than house ground problems.

Here is an example of what a ground block looks like. Single-Grounding-Block A lot of times there may be connections for 2-3 cables.
post #7152 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

I'm having a little trouble understanding what you are saying so a photo would help. The grounding block can be mounted anywhere stable, preferably where it won't get wet. However as I stated above there should not be an independent ground rod for it. This is because when you connect your cable to the receiver, you create two ground points for the house. This can cause something called a ground loop which can cause all kinds of issues with your equipment. It can even be dangerous is there is an issue elsewhere in your house wiring. It's best not to have one rather than house ground problems.

Here is an example of what a ground block looks like. Single-Grounding-Block A lot of times there may be connections for 2-3 cables.

Thanks for the photo. Different than what I have. Photos to follow as soon as I get them. I need to figure out where the main ground is for the house. I'm definitely in learning mode. Given what you say, I may well have a big problem waiting to happen. Argh. But better to know.
post #7153 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Yeah, let's stick to discussions a little more related to the topic, if you don't mind. We have other threads for the Aereo discussion. Though not one for the use of Klingon in government correspondence. But I'm sure there's a forum somewhere that does. biggrin.gif

lol, It was local news for charlotte, it was the only reason I posted it. How often do you see someone resign in klingon haha.
post #7154 of 7640
Ok, so onto the subject of OTA, I just got my Antennacraft hbu33 in. I hope to get it mounted in the next day or so, but the question I have is: Am I going to need any type of preamp? I am using existing cable from directv that was installed last year. I am guessing that it is probably around 75 feet of cable from where the antenna will be to the tuner. This is all new to me, so any help will be appreciated,
post #7155 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asdar View Post

Ok, so onto the subject of OTA, I just got my Antennacraft hbu33 in. I hope to get it mounted in the next day or so, but the question I have is: Am I going to need any type of preamp? I am using existing cable from directv that was installed last year. I am guessing that it is probably around 75 feet of cable from where the antenna will be to the tuner. This is all new to me, so any help will be appreciated,
Sometimes an amp will help with long cable runs or if there are splitters involved. You could possibly need an amp at the junction box, or where the signal splits. Or a moderate gain preamp at the antenna. Channel Master 7778 is now 16db, and the Winegard LNA-200 is 19db. But 75 feet is not that long unless you are in a fringe area or have multiple splits.
post #7156 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayle28607 View Post

Interesting! The Winegard currently does pick up loads of FM. We tend not to use FM there, out of habit, I guess. Great point, and good food for thought.
Well that brings up another issue. If you continue to use the Winegard, then you may want to install an FM trap along the line to your TV to prevent overload or interference with the TV signals. The FM traps are sold at RadioShack and usually go before the preamp.
post #7157 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayle28607 View Post

It may not have leaked because it has electrical tape on it now. That said, which is better to keep out water, the electrical tape or liquid sealant? And if it's liquid sealant, do you mean something like a bead of silicone, or something else that would be better? And if electrical tape is the best, do you mean just the normal kind I have around here in abundance?

(I haven't unscrewed the DB8's box yet to see how it is designed to prevent water intrusion, or even if it is water proofed at all. Don't have the 91XG yet, but that box is probably the same as it comes from Antennas Direct, too.)
The newer versions of the 91XG and DB8 have a circuit board balun rather than the older style matching transformer ... Also please try to pull up the signal meter on your Panasonic TV so you will see how strong your signals may be. You would like to be at least 60% rather than just hanging on the edge at 40%. With a higher number you would likely be less subject to dropouts.
post #7158 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asdar View Post

Ok, so onto the subject of OTA, I just got my Antennacraft hbu33 in. I hope to get it mounted in the next day or so, but the question I have is: Am I going to need any type of preamp? I am using existing cable from directv that was installed last year. I am guessing that it is probably around 75 feet of cable from where the antenna will be to the tuner. This is all new to me, so any help will be appreciated,

TylerSC gives good advice, however I would try it without the amp first. If the antenna is outside, there are no other splitters, then you might be OK. See if you are getting the channels you want. IMO, I think it's best if you can avoid an amp but certainly get one if you need it. If this is an issue of getting up to the antenna, then try it out on the ground first. This will at least give you an idea what that cable is doing.
post #7159 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayle28607 View Post

Thanks for the photo. Different than what I have. Photos to follow as soon as I get them. I need to figure out where the main ground is for the house. I'm definitely in learning mode. Given what you say, I may well have a big problem waiting to happen. Argh. But better to know.

It should be near the power meter.
post #7160 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

TylerSC gives good advice, however I would try it without the amp first. If the antenna is outside, there are no other splitters, then you might be OK. See if you are getting the channels you want. IMO, I think it's best if you can avoid an amp but certainly get one if you need it. If this is an issue of getting up to the antenna, then try it out on the ground first. This will at least give you an idea what that cable is doing.
Yes he may not need an amp if he is in Charlotte. Sometimes amps help, other times they do more harm than good. However, some folks in east Charlotte have problems sometimes with some of the Dallas signals. Possibly a low gain amp could help there, but you have to be careful to avoid overload from WSOC and WCCB. Similarly, with my situation, I need an amp to get WLOS, WCNC, WJZY, and WMYT. But I do not need amp to get WYFF, WSPA, or even WBTV. So it can be a delicate balance when dealing with various signals from multiple directions.
post #7161 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerSC View Post

Well you can't even go into Sears, Walmart, Lowe's or Home Depot and buy an outside antenna anymore. And I don't really know of any local stores that sell or install antennas other than Radioshack. And the sales folk there don't even know enough to tell you what type of antenna to buy. I was in RadioShack the other day and they recommended the large all band C490 antenna from Antennacraft, which was unnecessary. The HBU-33 is a better choice. But I do know there is a good local electronics store near downtown Winston-Salem that sells good antennas from Winegard and Antennacraft. And there is a local electronics store on Asheville Hwy. in Spartanburg that also sells antennas.


Lowes in Hickory, NC stocks RCA antennas, rotors, and mounting hardware. The price on the RCA rotor is the best I found if you use a $10.00 off $50 code.

The Antennacraft C490 is an all band antenna FM included. I bought one about a month ago, and it is a signal gathering magnet. I had a Winegard 9032 previously, and the C490 provides better uhf signal one the same mast at 18 agl. WYFF channel 4 uhf Greenville, SC at 78 air miles no problem rain or shine. WLOS 13 vhf at 77 air miles no problem. Low power WTVI channel 42(11 vhf) at 50 air miles comes in gang busters. Columbia, SC WIS channel 10 vhf at 110 air miles occasionally during good weather. WXII(uhf channel 12) Winston Salem at 75 air miles really good too.

Anyway, C490 is a dang good antenna for my purposes which includes FM reception. I would not hesitate in buying an HBU-55, but at Radio Shack they are over priced, and really offer nothing more than the cheaper C490.
post #7162 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by snippits75 View Post

Lowes in Hickory, NC stocks RCA antennas, rotors, and mounting hardware. The price on the RCA rotor is the best I found if you use a $10.00 off $50 code.

The Antennacraft C490 is an all band antenna FM included. I bought one about a month ago, and it is a signal gathering magnet. I had a Winegard 9032 previously, and the C490 provides better uhf signal one the same mast at 18 agl. WYFF channel 4 uhf Greenville, SC at 78 air miles no problem rain or shine. WLOS 13 vhf at 77 air miles no problem. Low power WTVI channel 42(11 vhf) at 50 air miles comes in gang busters. Columbia, SC WIS channel 10 vhf at 110 air miles occasionally during good weather. WXII(uhf channel 12) Winston Salem at 75 air miles really good too.

Anyway, C490 is a dang good antenna for my purposes which includes FM reception. I would not hesitate in buying an HBU-55, but at Radio Shack they are over priced, and really offer nothing more than the cheaper C490.
Very good results. Those Antennacraft antennas seem to perform very well and are made in the USA along with Winegard. And although Low VHF may no longer be needed, I can't help but wonder if the longer elements still somehow help with capturing more signal for Hi VHF and even UHF. I don't really know. But like you said, they are very good for FM radio. And that C490 is sold at Radioshack and is indeed cheaper than the HBU-55. And it is also good if some of the Lowe's are now carrying outside antennas again. But all I have seen is some RCA branded indoor antennas. Although Winegard makes the RCA 751 antenna, but it is for very local and suburban areas only and is rather small.
post #7163 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by snippits75 View Post

Lowes in Hickory, NC stocks RCA antennas, rotors, and mounting hardware. The price on the RCA rotor is the best I found if you use a $10.00 off $50 code.

The Antennacraft C490 is an all band antenna FM included. I bought one about a month ago, and it is a signal gathering magnet. I had a Winegard 9032 previously, and the C490 provides better uhf signal one the same mast at 18 agl. WYFF channel 4 uhf Greenville, SC at 78 air miles no problem rain or shine. WLOS 13 vhf at 77 air miles no problem. Low power WTVI channel 42(11 vhf) at 50 air miles comes in gang busters. Columbia, SC WIS channel 10 vhf at 110 air miles occasionally during good weather. WXII(uhf channel 12) Winston Salem at 75 air miles really good too.

Anyway, C490 is a dang good antenna for my purposes which includes FM reception. I would not hesitate in buying an HBU-55, but at Radio Shack they are over priced, and really offer nothing more than the cheaper C490.

My bet is if you are receiving WTVI with a very strong signal at Hickory, you are seeing the transmitter on WHKY's downtown tower. Not the transmitter in North East Charoltte. We run a channel 11 cut antenna @ 200 feet, with an amp, and channel filter to back up the fiber to the Hickory TX. That system has issues.
post #7164 of 7640
I wonder if anyone here knows if CBS Radio is ever going to upgrade Kiss 95.1 to an HD Radio signal? Their plans have been continuously postponed, as well as WSOC-103.7. Looks like they would have done 95.1 before 97.9 or 101.9, as 95.1 has the stronger signal from the WJZY tower. The HD audio quality on Channel 96.1 is excellent. But not a commentary on the music itself. I have gotten to where I tend to prefer the variety hits on 102.9 and 107.9 moreso than the hit music formats.
post #7165 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesla_engineer View Post

My bet is if you are receiving WTVI with a very strong signal at Hickory, you are seeing the transmitter on WHKY's downtown tower. Not the transmitter in North East Charoltte. We run a channel 11 cut antenna @ 200 feet, with an amp, and channel filter to back up the fiber to the Hickory TX. That system has issues.

Did something happen to the power on WHKY's main transmitter? I've got a DB8 pointed straight at it in Huntersville and I'm having a very hard time picking it up. It used to be pretty easy to receive.
post #7166 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesla_engineer View Post

My bet is if you are receiving WTVI with a very strong signal at Hickory, you are seeing the transmitter on WHKY's downtown tower. Not the transmitter in North East Charoltte. We run a channel 11 cut antenna @ 200 feet, with an amp, and channel filter to back up the fiber to the Hickory TX. That system has issues.

Yes I get than one too, but it defaults on my Insignia TV to 14.1 and so does WHKY channel 14. So on my TV channel list I have 14.1 through 14.3 times two, and one 14.1 is WTVI translator and the other 14.1 is WHKY and so on. The Charlotte WTVI signal defaults to 42.1 on my tv, and the Antenna Craft C490 pulls it in very good.
post #7167 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

Did something happen to the power on WHKY's main transmitter? I've got a DB8 pointed straight at it in Huntersville and I'm having a very hard time picking it up. It used to be pretty easy to receive.

I seem to have lost WHKY, also. Everything else seems fine.
post #7168 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerSC View Post

The newer versions of the 91XG and DB8 have a circuit board balun rather than the older style matching transformer ... Also please try to pull up the signal meter on your Panasonic TV so you will see how strong your signals may be. You would like to be at least 60% rather than just hanging on the edge at 40%. With a higher number you would likely be less subject to dropouts.

Hi tylerSC -

Here are my results with the existing Winegard HD8200 and existing soon-to-be-replaced RG-6:

3-1 WBTV-DT (CBS) (74%, peak 74%)
3-2 Bounce (71%, peak 74%)
9-1 WSOC (ABC) (20%, peak 21%)
9-2 WSOC-WX 9 (16%, peak 23%)
24 ??? (Shadows and snow) Currently gone.
26-1 UNC-TV (PBS) (70%, peak 70%)
26-2 UNC-KD (68%, peak 68%)
26-3 UNC-EX (68%, peak 68%)
36-1 WCNC-HD (NBC) (70%, peak 70%)
36-2 WCNC-LW (LWN) (74%, peak 74%)
46-1 WJZY (61%, peak 68%)
46-2 Ant-TV (68%, peak 68%)

I'm obviously not pulling in the two WSOC's any longer - or at least nothing to speak of in terms of a clear picture. I seem to have lost them when I cleaned the fittings on the old cable and had to push one of the fittings back on.

My Walmart only had pre-built lengths of RG-6 - no bulk - so I bought a GE quad shield run, but can't hook it up today. I assume when I connect that up I will once again get the two WSOC's. Meanwhile, the full experiment is still on hold as I wait for the 91XG to arrive.
Edited by gayle28607 - 1/12/14 at 2:16pm
post #7169 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcat6 View Post

It should be near the power meter.

Found it; it's exactly where you said. Power meter is on the opposite side of the house (north side) from the antenna. The antenna ground is on the SE corner of the house, with the ground for the cable a few feet away.

I'm doing some reading in threads here about how that cable run is supposed to be grounded. Thanks for alerting me to the problem.eek.gif
post #7170 of 7640
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayle28607 View Post

Found it; it's exactly where you said. Power meter is on the opposite side of the house (north side) from the antenna. The antenna ground is on the SE corner of the house, with the ground for the cable a few feet away.

If it's any consolation, this happens a lot because people don't want to run a long cable like that and they figure it will do no harm. Aside from the ground loop issue, if the main ground ever gets disconnected, your TV or receiver becomes the main ground for the house. That can exciting.
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