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Fabric Frames

post #1 of 897
Thread Starter 
I like the way these fabric frames are turning out but it is a lot of work and produces tons of sawdust.


LL
post #2 of 897
Great looking.

How are you getting the bevel edge look? Is that the saw dust part?

How are you attaching them?
post #3 of 897
Thread Starter 
The saw dust comes from cutting all the two inch strips of ply wood and MDF to make the frames. I use both plywood and MDF. The plywood is the bottom layer and MDF is the top layer. The Plywood helps with strength and the MDF makes a nice clean 45 degree angle.

More saw dust comes from using the router to create the 45 degree corners.

See the attached photo



I started using Velcro, but after the first two frames switched to liquid nails and a 2 inch brad in each of the corners. With the nail gun set correctly the brad disappear under the fabric. If it is still visible i dab the top of the brad with a black felt tip pen.
LL
post #4 of 897
Very Nice work, I will going to frames myself, because I prefer that look vs the chair rail. Do you have a pic of a finished frame(pre fabric) and is the finish product 1 or 2 inches thick?

Also is Industrail Velcro being used to hold the frame?

Ozzie
post #5 of 897
Thread Starter 
Here is a stack of frames ready for fabric.

The first two I used Velcro, then is started using liquid nails and a two inch brad in each of the corners. With a nail gun and the correct setting the brad disappears under the fabric.
LL
post #6 of 897
GPowers
Thanks for these pics, the MDF looks like its about 3/4" thick, how thick is the finished product?

I want to use velcro, to make it easy for me to remove if I ever have to recover. Did the velcro give you problems?

Was the fabric cut at the corners in order to avoid a fabric buldge or did you resolve this a different way?

Ozzie
post #7 of 897
Thread Starter 
Plywood and MDF are both 1/2 inch thick to accommodate the 1" Linacoustic and poly batten.

There was only minimal fabric at the corners. It did not cause a problem.

I just did not like the way the Velcro was working, plus it was expensive.
post #8 of 897
Looks good Greg.

It's much easier to just build the frames on the wall and then add the GOM, poly and cloth, especially if you don't plan to change the panels for a long time.
post #9 of 897
I sincerly hope that everyone who works with mdf knows about the health issues that can arise when the dust isn't properly handled. GPowers your panels look great.
post #10 of 897
Quote:


I sincerly hope that everyone who works with mdf knows about the health issues that can arise when the dust isn't properly handled.

No, What are they?
post #11 of 897
Quote:


Originally posted by GPowers
I like he way these fabric frames are turning out but it is a lot of work and produces tons of sawdust.

Hi Greg,

Couldn't agree more on the mess. However, like you, I like the look of my frames to be sure. I took a completely different angle on my frames because I wanted them to be removable and light but I do like your approach : ) .

Your theater looks very professional and I can tell you build with passion ! Very well done !

Chris
post #12 of 897
Quote:


More saw dust comes from using the router to create the 45 degree corners.

Ok, as a woodworker I have to ask what the heck are you doing routing 45 degree corners when a table saw will do this quicker and with less dust? A saw blade only cuts roughly an eighth of an inch, a router is cutting out all that waste. And I cannot believe you would have a sharp router blade after a couple of panels.

Other than that, your finished product looks great and very professional! Much better than the typical GOM look I see over and over again on this forum.

Brian
post #13 of 897
Quote:


Quote:


I sincerly hope that everyone who works with mdf knows about the health issues that can arise when the dust isn't properly handled.

No, What are they?

If I remember correctly MDF is made with Formaldehyde.

Brian
post #14 of 897
Here is one of the safety spec sheets by one of the manufacturers of MDF...

http://www.sierrapine.com/products/m...%20Medford.pdf

Chris
post #15 of 897
GPowers
You found 1/2" plywood?
I thought 1/2" plywood was not actually 1/2". Like 2 X 4 are not actually 2" by 4".

Also one more pic request if you have it is a close up of one of the panel corners to see how it was wrapped and staple. Preferably the back of one.

Again thanks a bunch, these photos help dummies like me that have never build a thing.

Ozzie
post #16 of 897
Thread Starter 
I think the plywood was 7/16" at $21 per sheet. I also found some hardwood vener plywood that was listed as 1/2" at $25 a sheet.

Pictures to follow this evening. I need to get some work done.
post #17 of 897
Thread Starter 
Brian:

I used the table saw to do the first few frames that only had a horizontal, top and bottom, 45 degree cut. I switched to the router when i needed to do three and four sides of the panel. The table saw just did not produce the look i wanted on the corners etc...

The router bit is still working great and i have done about 40 panels. Can not say that for my 20 year old router. The trigger switch went bad.

The router bit is a Bosch brand and is very large & weighty bit, is was expensive too. Maybe thats why it is still cutting great. The smaller sears bits i have used usually start to burn and over heat.

So i guess it comes down to the tools you have at hand and i do not have a great table saw and the router produced cleaner frames.

Greg
post #18 of 897
Greg,

Those are very nice looking frames. I still have not cleaned all the MDF dust out of my shop after making mine.

Clay
post #19 of 897
Thread Starter 
Clay

Thanks, it has been a four year process to get to this point.

My tempoary shop is the office area next to the theater. The nice thing is when it is not raining I do the worod working outside by the pool. But for the past week is has been raining in southern California. So all the sawing and routering has been done in the future office area.

Greg
post #20 of 897
Thread Starter 
Ozzie:

Here are a few photos of the corners. Very little bulk, the fabric was not cut, just pull around the corners. There is a slight ripple but it is past the 45 degree cut and will not be seen when the frames are pushed against each other.



As you can see the sun is shining again in SoCal so i can keep the saw dust outside.
LL
post #21 of 897
Thread Starter 
Ozzie:

Another fabric frame photo


LL
post #22 of 897
Thread Starter 
Ozzie:

One last one of the whole frame and my neat work shoes. This shows the whole back of the frame befor the Linacoustic or poly batten is installed.
LL
post #23 of 897
In the picture where you show the outlet in the middle of the GOM panel. How did you do that?

Great looking panels by the way.
post #24 of 897
Thread Starter 
The left side of the frame is solid. The top piece of MDF extends past the two inch plywood under frame. Then I mounted a LV backless box in the whole to extent the existing electrical box and it also provides the mounting points for the receptacles.

I have another one to do today or Friday I will post a photo of the frame then.
post #25 of 897
Thanks, that would be great.
post #26 of 897
GPowers Thanks again!!!

Those last two picks you put up helped me alot. I am going to see of I can find 1/2" wood for my frames, 1/2" MDF is easy, but my 1/2" wood does not come out to 1/2" and would make my frame the incorrect thickness, but it appears that your 7/16" plywood seems to be good enough.

When you shoot the nails thru it did you pre-mark stud locations or are you just hitting the drywall?

Ozzie
post #27 of 897
Greg, I expect we will see many copies and derivations of your design technique. It really looks good and I applaud you for your creativity and attention to detail.

I hereby declare that this type of theater look will now be called the "Greg Gom" theater
post #28 of 897
Quote:


Originally posted by Rutgar
In the picture where you show the outlet in the middle of the GOM panel. How did you do that?

Great looking panels by the way.

I would like to see pic's of this as well.

Craig
post #29 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Originally posted by Oswald Pascual
GPowers Thanks again!!!

When you shoot the nails thru it did you pre-mark stud locations or are you just hitting the drywall?

Ozzie

The brads are only two inches long so with the one inch frame, 5/8 inch dry wall and 1/2 soundstop board i'm not getting in to the stud. Two inch is the longest 18ga brad nail gun i could find.

The brad just holds the frame in place until the liquid nail drys.
post #30 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Originally posted by PAP
Greg, I expect we will see many copies and derivations of your design technique. It really looks good and I applaud you for your creativity and attention to detail.

I hereby declare that this type of theater look will now be called the "Greg Gom" theater

Thanks for the complement. But i have seen other like designs on this board.

This was in the planning stage for a long time. And i think others used the technique before i was able to implement frames in my theater.

The genesis of the design was from the Golden Dreams theater at Disney California Adventure, in Anaheim California. I had seen theaters with these frames before, but was unsure of the technique used to create the design.

Seeing the walls at the Golden Dreams theater brought it all together.

I think the biggest difference with my frames are the consistent size. Which was done for three reasons:
1. To achieve the look,
2. Minimize waist of fabric (two frames are the same width as the GOM fabric).
3. Assemble line production of constant sized frames
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