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Fabric Frames - Page 5

post #121 of 897
Greg - thanks ! These details will keep me busy for hours at the cad system I am sure. My dimensions have to change slightly based on some obstructions, but I am trying to maintain the same depth off the ceiling as you did so that I can get a similar "light wash" on the ceiling.

Will look for your sketch later this week or whenever you get to it. Thanks very much again.

Lewis
post #122 of 897
Thread Starter 
The finished measurement from the wall to the center of the down light is 6" as the fabric frames are 1" deep.

Greg
post #123 of 897
Thread Starter 
Lewis

Here is a link to a rough sketch of the soffit. Hope it helps. Would be nice to see a CAD drawing of this draft. The drawing does not show the GOM wall frames that bring the wall out another inch under the soffit.

The GOM is started on the underside of the soffit wiht a blind seam. Then is finoshed off on the inside of the lighting tray.

PDF image of soffit
post #124 of 897
GPowers, these MDF strips for making the frames seem to have to much flexibilty in them if cut to long. Is this way you used wood for a backing on them? I like using MDF behind MDF since I am only using 1" of sound absorbing material. The two 1/2" MDF makes it a perfect fit. I am afraid if I use a wood backing the fiberglass will be loose behind it since one cant find 1/2" wood.

Ozzie
post #125 of 897
Greg:

I have printed out that .pdf sketch you did of the soffit and will slap it into the Cad system today. I think I can figure out how to crank a .pdf from the Autocad system and will attach it to a reply here for you to take a look at.

By the way - there's one dimension that seems to be missing now that I look at your sketch. How far off the wall is the vertical portion of the soffit that closes in the light box? It's shown as 9" down from the ceiling, but no dimension from the wall.

Oh - and one other question on the rope light. When you have the soffit lights turned on - how far from the vertical portion of the light soffit does the light tend to spill onto the ceiling ? I am guessing it's somewhere between 12-15 inches but wanted to check with you. I may have a portion of the central part of my ceiling with a "black" surface so that I can install a fiber optic star field some day - but I don't want to encroach onto the light spill of the soffit.

Anyway, if I am not pestered too much with "work" here today I should be able to get that cad sketch done....


Cheers,
Lewis
post #126 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Originally posted by Oswald Pascual
GPowers, these MDF strips for making the frames seem to have to much flexibility in them if cut to long. Is this way you used wood for a backing on them?
Ozzie

I was also concerned about the strength of the MDF, but also wanted a smooth finish. Plywood has the strength but I could not get a smooth 45 degree bevel.

That is why i used the sandwich approach. The top layer of MDF for a smooth finish and the bottom layer of plywood for strength. I also kept the frame size small to avoid bowing and flexing problems when stretching the fabric.

Did not have any problems with the Linocoustic using the sandwich approach.
post #127 of 897
GPowers, is your panels then an even 2"? I would like to get mine an even 1", but some of my panels need to be a bit longer. If I use a wood backing it may end up being to thick, since no such thing is 1/2 smooth wood out here.

Ozzie
post #128 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Originally posted by Oswald Pascual
GPowers, is your panels then an even 2"? I would like to get mine an even 1", but some of my panels need to be a bit longer. If I use a wood backing it may end up being to thick, since no such thing is 1/2 smooth wood out here.

Ozzie

The frames are a fraction under one inch thick.
post #129 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Originally posted by LewisCobb

How far off the wall is the vertical portion of the soffit that closes in the light box?

Lewis

The light tray is only 3" deep from the outside edge
post #130 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:


Originally posted by LewisCobb
Greg:

When you have the soffit lights turned on - how far from the vertical portion of the light soffit does the light tend to spill onto the ceiling ?

Lewis

Light spills on the ceiling out from the wall 5" bright and fading out at 11".

See photo below:


post #131 of 897
Greg:

I've attached a first crack at the cad drawing of the soffit. It's a bit off as far as line weight goes - I have been unable to figure out how to make the lines any thinner in the AutoCad/Acrobat .pdf generator but it still gets the idea across.

Have a look.

Lewis

PS - just realized I forgot to include the linocoustic between the mdf and the GOM.....

 

soffit.pdf 32.759765625k . file
post #132 of 897
Thread Starter 
Thanks Lewis, your CAD drawing looks a lot cleaner then my hand drawing.
post #133 of 897
Greg:

Do you have any "lights on" shots of your screen wall? I'm trying to visualize the soffits as they wrap around to the front of the room. I have seen some pics on the forum where people stop them at the front wall, and some where they wrap them all around the room but I was wondering what you did in yours.

Thanks
Lewis
post #134 of 897
Thread Starter 
There is no sofit on the screen wall
post #135 of 897
Greg,

I think your theater looks awesome. Different from most seen on the forums. Nice job!
post #136 of 897
Yes, this theater is a beauty.
Definitely very unique with the panels, but looks like a lot of work as well.

Craig
post #137 of 897
Thread Starter 
Craig

The panels took about 80 hours to do. There are a total of 70 fabric covered frames. But i think the look was worth it.
post #138 of 897
I really like the look too. I have a customer who is going to do his room similarly. When I move into my (hopefully) last house in a few years, I'd seriously consider doing mine this way.
post #139 of 897
I love this too - and will do something similar when that time comes. I read the thread, but must have missed this; I see you attach the panels to the wall with liquid nails and brads in the corners. However, is this straight onto drywall?

Any idea of a way to do the frames in an easier fashion? I don't have any other equipment than a regular circular saw... (so routing etc is a bit outside my realm - mostly because I don't think I'm handy enough

Also, what was the size of the room you said? Just wondering with 1100 for the GOM.

Lastly, I see you got some acoustical material to fill, how much was the cost of this?

Thanks!

-Tom
post #140 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Craig

The panels took about 80 hours to do. There are a total of 70 fabric covered frames. But i think the look was worth it.


Yes, I think it was worth the effort.
Pictures never do these dark HT rooms justice and your room looks absolutely fabulous!!

Craig
post #141 of 897
Wow!!! Lots of good ideas here. When I purchase my house and start designing the home theater room, I only hope to have it look as good.
post #142 of 897
Thread Starter 
Tom:

The brads were only two inches long, so by the time they go through the one inch frame, 5/8 drywall and 1/2 sound board thats it. The brads are only to hold the frame until the liquid nails drys. The liquid nails is the permanent bond and prevents vibration.

The method I used was the easy most efficient way I Could think of using the tools I had. I would not attempt this unless you have a table saw. Unless you are very good with a power hand tools. The hardest part of the frames is getting the four corners of the frames to meet correctly. So the frames need to be a constant size over and over and over. If not, your frame corners will to be offset and it will look like crap.

So however you do the frames the dimensions must be constant!
post #143 of 897
Greg, thanks so much for clarifying! I REALLY like the look of your room, so regardless of the approach, I hope it will look close to what you have.
post #144 of 897
Greg...I see that this thread has been resurrected! I wanted to thank you anyway for the great ideas I have gleaned from you over the last year in planning and designing my theater. I plan to use panels built exactly the same way but about 7' tall and 24-28" wide. Attached the same way, and spaced between columns. The details in your pictures are extremely helpful. I'll use SoundSuede material over frames of Lincoustic and/or poly batting. Figure I'll need close to 20 panels. I'll post pictures when I start them.

Bondsan (Bob)
post #145 of 897
Bondsan

How wide is the wood you are going to use to make these panels? I wanted to do larger panels myself, bit panels that long might warp as one staples the fabric on to. Specially around the center area. They would also be a bit on the heavy side, do you plan on using commercial velcro or some how nailing it to the walls?

Ozzie
post #146 of 897
I just made a 6 ft long frame to go on a door and I included an extra cross piece at the midpoint to keep it from bowing.
post #147 of 897
As a tribute to Mr Powers here is a pic of my recently completed theater with the same fabric panels.

Paul
LL
post #148 of 897
Love the look.
post #149 of 897
Ozzie,

Still undecided on the size of the framing. I'll probably have to experiment. I may cut 2 x 4 material into one inch strips (actual dimension would by 1 1/2 " X 1") or maybe 1 x 3 material (I would need to cut something out of 1/4" to attach to the back so I have my exact one inch depth for the Lincoustic and batting). I definately will use two cross braces for stability.

Bondsan (Bob)
post #150 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Klassen View Post

As a tribute to Mr Powers here is a pic of my recently completed theater with the same fabric panels.

Paul

Thanks Paul,

I like the red frames and no columns, it gives your theater a simple clean look. Can you post some more photos so we can see the rest of the theater.

Greg
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