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Fabric Frames - Page 15

post #421 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

1. The fiberglass is just press in to the back of the fabric frame.

2. The Fiberglass id held in place by friction.

3. I used one inch linacoustic from John Manville Insulation. It has a facing on one side. That is the side that is up against the fabric

Yep - that is what I did as well for my frames.
post #422 of 897
My fg board also has backing on one side. It's like an aluminum foil material. So you guys are putting this side against the fabric? That;s where the sound is going to be coming in through, so I assumed I wanted the fiberglass in direct contact with the fabric, so the sound is absorbed. Wouldn't the backing be more reflective, and hence defeat the purpose of having the fiberglass in there in the first place?!
post #423 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gnolivos View Post

My fg board also has backing on one side. It's like an aluminum foil material. So you guys are putting this side against the fabric? That;s where the sound is going to be coming in through, so I assumed I wanted the fiberglass in direct contact with the fabric, so the sound is absorbed. Wouldn't the backing be more reflective, and hence defeat the purpose of having the fiberglass in there in the first place?!

The facing on the linacoustic from John Manville product is not aluminum foil. It looks like a more compressed version of the balance of the product. There is no stray fibers from the fiberglass that will come through the GOM material.

The 703 product is already tightly compressed so it should not be a problem sticking through the GOM fabric.

I do know that there is a spray on product that i have seen HVAC guys use on the unfaced side of 703 type products when they make HVAC air duct boxed. It doses give the un-faced surface a more finished feel and should control any stray fibers.
post #424 of 897
Thanks GPowers... I figured it out. My version has aluminum backing, but te other side is in fact just as you described... the fiber is sort of treated, such that it does not release at all.... so I let that side face the GoM. Panels are looking great! Now to figure out best way to attach mine. I am thinking of just using 4 screws, one at each corner. Then cover the screws with those neat hinge screw caps. I think I will need to pre-open the holes on the fabric with a soldering gun, so it does not fray.... still thinking about this approach...
post #425 of 897
Be aware that the direction that the backing faces will affect how much the panel will absorb highs/mids. Put the facing towards the room and it will be more reflective. Reverse it more absorbive. Or so I understand. I hired a consultant to design my room, and depending on location and purpose (e.g. bass trapping) he specified faced or unfaced insulation.
post #426 of 897
Thread Starter 
Got my HDMI card for the NEC switcher back this weekend from ROC. Moone did a great job. The card worked with out any problems. So now the LG HD player handshakes, across HDMI, with out any problems and the color space was fixed.

The next problem is the NEC 9PG+ will only do 1080i not 1080p so we are suffering with movies in 1080i.

Doug Baisey did a fantastic job fine tuning the HDMI signal. He produced a very sharp image. Thanks Doug.
post #427 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Right now the frames butt up too the carpet. See the photo:



Not sure yet if I will leave it for a clean uncluttered look or add some base molding. It depends on how it holds up to the vacuum. If I do add base molding it will be place on top of the frames and be 3 or 4 inches high with some kind of detail on the top edge.

Greg - how has it been holding up to the vacuum?

I am buying wood and mdf today and will start cutting down to strips.
post #428 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

Greg - how has it been holding up to the vacuum?

I am buying wood and mdf today and will start cutting down to strips.

It has not been a problem. But then again the room is only used 3 days a week, 2 to 3 at a time. So it is not vacumed every day like other rooms in the house.
post #429 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

...it is not vacumed every day like other rooms in the house.

Surely you jest. Or maybe this is done by the "help"
post #430 of 897
Without base molding, what about damage from feet? (kids)
post #431 of 897
Thinking about the fabrication process, if one wants to spend a bit more $$ and be a bit wasteful of material, but speed up the process, how about using 1" ultralight MDF (guessing about $40 per sheet, [1/2" is $30, 3/4" is $32]). Cost will be just over $1 per square foot. You could also laminate two 1/2" mdf, but the goal is to save labor.

First cut he MDF to desired panel size on a table saw.

Create a router template (or just use a router table with a straight cut bit and a fence offset of the stile/rail width, say 2"), and cut out the center of the panels. The whole panel also faciliates easier outlet holes when needed, etc.

The use the router table setup (much faster than freehand) to mill the bevel (lots of material removed, but a large router/table setup - 3HP home shop type).

For both operations (center cutout and bevel), be sure to use a VAC/dust collector.

Costs are higher, but you save all the time of assembling the frame from laminated strips, no real measuring to effort to stay square. One could probably finish each operation (panelization, center cut and bevel) in a few hours for a large room.

db
post #432 of 897
Has anyone considered looking into frames (Screen Splines) for screen windows with the rubber strips inserted into the tracks to hold the screen in place (in our case the fabric). There are pre drilled holes in the frames for screws or nails. Home depot or Lowes (Can't remember) sells individual lengths along with the rubber strips. If I get a chance I might test this.

Use one of these tools:
post #433 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbbarron View Post

Without base molding, what about damage from feet? (kids)

The room will be three years old this December and the lack of a base board has not been a problem. Even with my grandchildern that are 2 & 4 year old boys.
post #434 of 897
Okay, I have a nice big pile of ripped down mdf (3/4")

and ply (1/4"):

Next step is cutting the mdf to add the bevel. I know Greg went with the router. I am a dead man if I buy another tool, so it will be the table saw for me. I need to work on my skills.



At this point, since Lowes only had 3/4" mdf, I went with 1/4" ply for my 1"frames (all but the back wall), I am thinking I will glue the mdf and ply before assembling my frames. I was planning on miter cuts, glued, with brads. I hadn't decided whether to make the miter cuts separately for the ply and MDF, or after they are glued. I was thinking about making the miter cuts first, then gluing the strips together, then joining the corners to make the frame. With this approach I might be making a frame a night. Slow yes, but doable.

Any comments? I am open to suggestions.
post #435 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

At this point, since Lowes only had 3/4" mdf, I went with 1/4" ply for my 1"frames (all but the back wall), I am thinking I will glue the mdf and ply before assembling my frames. I was planning on miter cuts, glued, with brads. I hadn't decided whether to make the miter cuts separately for the ply and MDF, or after they are glued. I was thinking about making the miter cuts first, then gluing the strips together, then joining the corners to make the frame. With this approach I might be making a frame a night. Slow yes, but doable.

Any comments? I am open to suggestions.

I'm also at the frame mockup stage and I used a hybrid approach that seemed to make the strongest frame. I wanted to cut my bevels before assembling the frames, so, like you, I got into a miter situation. What I ended up doing was laying out the bottom layer using butt joints and only mitering the top, beveled layer. This allowed me to still lap the two layers. Each top piece ends up being attached to two bottom pieces. I think it will work out nice and should keep my cuts simpler.
- Dave
post #436 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by dth122 View Post

I'm also at the frame mockup stage and I used a hybrid approach that seemed to make the strongest frame. I wanted to cut my bevels before assembling the frames, so, like you, I got into a miter situation. What I ended up doing was laying out the bottom layer using butt joints and only mitering the top, beveled layer. This allowed me to still lap the two layers. Each top piece ends up being attached to two bottom pieces. I think it will work out nice and should keep my cuts simpler.
- Dave


I had to read it twice (its me, not you) before I got what you are getting at. Interesting approach. I will see if that makes it better.

I guess my concern/limitation may be the 1/4" ply may be tough to work with. That was the reason I was thinking of joining the mdf and ply prior to joining the corners. I have an old corner jig from a wainscotting project that I plan to use. I got pretty good at making frames doing that one.
post #437 of 897
When I started my beveled edges, I tried the router... what a mess! I changed to doing all my beveled cuts with the table saw. I didn't do the miter cuts, but opted to just bevel the top layer (ie, the MDF) along the length of the side and top/bottom for the corners. I glued all the pieces together, then I used a brad nailer for extra strength. Actually, once I got my assembly line set up it was cruising right along... but it did take some time to do the whole room.
post #438 of 897
William, did you cut the mdf down into strips and then add a bevel? You may have told me this already, I should re-read my pm's.
post #439 of 897
Yes, I cut them to size first then I gave the MDF the bevel cuts. I have to admit that the GOM does hide some of the minor mistakes...
post #440 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

At this point, since Lowes only had 3/4" mdf, I went with 1/4" ply for my 1"frames (all but the back wall), I am thinking I will glue the mdf and ply before assembling my frames. I was planning on miter cuts, glued, with brads. I hadn't decided whether to make the miter cuts separately for the ply and MDF, or after they are glued. I was thinking about making the miter cuts first, then gluing the strips together, then joining the corners to make the frame. With this approach I might be making a frame a night.

The 3/4 inch MDF bevel is going to be a little larger then the 1/2 MDF. Should be and intresting look with a deeper kerf. Any photos yet?

Greg
post #441 of 897
Greg,

I think everyone tweaks your original pattern just a bit to meet their own needs, wether its the material or the room. Thanks for inspiring me to do my theater like this.
post #442 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by William Seaward View Post

Greg,

I think everyone tweaks your original pattern just a bit to meet their own needs, wether its the material or the room. Thanks for inspiring me to do my theater like this.

Speaking of which, William e-mailed me these photos a while ago. They belong in this thread.

Here is Williams theater.







post #443 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

The 3/4 inch MDF bevel is going to be a little larger then the 1/2 MDF. Should be and intresting look with a deeper kerf. Any photos yet?

Greg

Nothing yet. I'll be posting though.
post #444 of 897
Just a side note - I am about to order my upholstery stapler and am wondering - what size staples are all you fellows useing for the GOM fastening - both on the frames as well as the proscenium arches etc.?

Lewis
post #445 of 897
Thread Starter 
Lewis, congrads sound like you are making progress if you are ordering tools. How far along are you?
post #446 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewisCobb View Post

Just a side note - I am about to order my upholstery stapler and am wondering - what size staples are all you fellows useing for the GOM fastening - both on the frames as well as the proscenium arches etc.?

Lewis

I've been using 1/2" and they seem to work well into both MDF and 2x4s. The key for me was getting the depth just right to hold the fabric as tight as possible without punching through or causing runs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

Speaking of which, William e-mailed me these photos a while ago. They belong in this thread.

Here is Williams theater.

If you'll excuse an off-topic question... what material and color is used here? It's what I've been looking to use in my build but haven't been able to find.
- Dave
post #447 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Lewis, congrads sound like you are making progress if you are ordering tools. How far along are you?

Hi Greg - I am not that far along yet - we're still trying to clear out the room that's going to be renovated for the theater. It's a bigger job than I thought. I am hoping to start tearing open the walls this fall and make the "official start". I have to get an e-mail off to Bryan Pape as I want him to review and consult me a little on the acoustics as well. I like to do woodworking and have been trying to finish up a new shop that I added onto my house a few years back over the past year. It's almost to the point where I can start to use it to build the theater now. If I can just get my wife's "to do" list put on hold that is

I'll be posting up some pics when I get underway.

Cheers,
Lewis
post #448 of 897
Hi Dave,

I bought the material approximately 2 years ago and it's GOM (www.guilfordofmaine.com) and the last time I checked, it was still available but that was some time ago. What I did was to go to their website and looked at the various colors and had them send me the colors. The color is called FR 701 - 2100 Ultramarine.

My pictures I took of my theater are not all that great (light kind of washed it out) and I need to have a professional take some to show everyone its true colors.
post #449 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by William Seaward View Post

Hi Dave,

I bought the material approximately 2 years ago and it's GOM (www.guilfordofmaine.com) and the last time I checked, it was still available but that was some time ago. What I did was to go to their website and looked at the various colors and had them send me the colors. The color is called FR 701 - 2100 Ultramarine.

My pictures I took of my theater are not all that great (light kind of washed it out) and I need to have a professional take some to show everyone its true colors.

Thanks for the note. I actually have a sample of Ultramarine - it was one of a few GOM colors that looked interesting online. One I received it, it looked much more green than I expected. This is interesting, because it looks blue in your pictures but I imagine it's more green like the sample I have. It's definitely difficult to take pictures that accurately represent the colors, especially in low light situations.
- Dave
post #450 of 897
Actually, there isn't any green in mine. I wonder if they changed the color?
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