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Fabric Frames - Page 18

post #511 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogurt80 View Post

Just a quickie- you may have already mentioned, but I didn't notice. Where did you get the fabric you used on your walls?

The GOM fabric was purchased from Silent Source.
post #512 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeIII View Post

A question about the staples.
I think my research turned up that you used a 1/2" crown stapler.
What length staples did you use?

What technique did you use in removing all those staples? Awl, flat bladed screwdriver, needle-nosed plyers?

Thanks
George

I use both 1/2 and 3/8 stables, The job would be impossible with out an pneumatic stapler.

The remodel on the additional sub was tough. All I could think of was pulling a thread and causing a huge snag in the fabric. To remove the staples i used a flat head screwdriver and a lineman's pliers. It worked great but took a whole day to pull all the staples and cut the hole.

Re-attaching all the fabric to all of 30 minutes.

Now I have spent more money on a SPL meter and several hours trying to get all the levels balanced out. Also look at REW software but that will take some time to figure out
post #513 of 897
Here's a view of my finished theater after much work. Greg, you were one of the people who really inspired me;


post #514 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR View Post

Here's a view of my finished theater after much work. Greg, you were one of the people who really inspired me;

I'm honored to have contributed to your desire to create such a wonderful looking Home theater.

I too drew allot of inspiration and how too information from this forum. Could not have built my home theater with out this forum.

My very first exposure to affordable home theaters was the Dave Bote (spelling?) Nate.
post #515 of 897
Thread Starter 
Got a photo of the screen wall finaly... Still need to work on the cameras white balancing. As the lighting causes the color to be out of Wack. Wacked, that is a technical term ya-know..

The fisheye lense makes the 110" screen look small. Maybe I need to start thinking about upgrading to a constant height, wall to wall screen with a new LCD projector?

post #516 of 897
I got inspiration from this thread on building the fabric squares and I wanted to add what I did. I can't imagine spending all that time routering all that wood. I think I missed it, but what was the problem you had with the table saw?

I had the luxury of building my frames to be deeper than those in this thread, but I used 1x3s standing on their edges to build my frames. They were very cheap, very easy to cut and are sufficiently strong as well as light and offers more face area to have insulation in. I'm sure they could have been cut down to be smaller than the 2 1/4" they came out to be and still be strong. I'm not sure how small you could go though.

Unfinished:


And wrapped:


I put a bit more detail on how I built them in my own build thread: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...1#post15896901
post #517 of 897
I am sure this is stated somewhere but I have not found it after hours of searching. And I am sure most people on here could answer my question in all of 3 minuets.

Am I correct that you put drywall (anything need between studs i.e. insulation for sound proof?)

On top of drywall goes Linacoustics / Duct Liner to ear level.

On top of that goes these panels which are wrapped in GOM. But they are attached to the Linacoustics how?

Am I correct on all this or did I miss something, if so where.
post #518 of 897
-Fill your walls with pink insulation prior to drywall. Don't overstuff/compress.
-Then drywall (consider multiple layers if you want to sound isolate.
-Then, if you make panels, add rigid fiberglass (e.g. Linacoustic) to the panels or leave them empty (or poly fill batting) depending on the overall acoustic plan.
post #519 of 897
So the rigid fiberglass or poly batting are actually built into panel?

So I would make a frame and put fiber glass on front of it (attach with glue or ?) then cover all that with GOM?

Or would the fiber glass go between the boards (like the glass of a picture frame) ?

Then just finishing nails to attach them to wall - and they will just blend into the fabric.
post #520 of 897
Take a look at the first few posts in this thread.
post #521 of 897
O. Thanks. After reading your explanation the first few post (I had read them before) made a lot more sense.
post #522 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mg57 View Post

So the rigid fiberglass or poly batting are actually built into panel?

So I would make a frame and put fiber glass on front of it (attach with glue or ?) then cover all that with GOM?

Or would the fiber glass go between the boards (like the glass of a picture frame) ?

Then just finishing nails to attach them to wall - and they will just blend into the fabric.

Here is a photo of a frame that is half solid (right side) and half Linacoustics (The black stuff on the left). The Linacoustics is just pressed into the frame. Friction holds it in place. The solid side is the MDF side for an electrical outlet.

Hope this helps.

post #523 of 897
I had seen that picture. Thanks for explanation. And great work. I am hoping the same idea will work for larger panels. Small ones look so nice but I can tell you put in a lot of work. I am hoping to do it a little quicker and cheaper (uses less wood). Anyway Nicely done.
post #524 of 897
Wow, gotta be one of my most like room/ treatment I've seen. A+++
post #525 of 897
Real nice....

It took me more than 2 hours to read the whoe thread, but it was certainly worthy. I thought I was done with the design phase of my HT, but I gotta incorporate at least some of the stuff shown here... I do really really like the most walls with the frames, but in my case, acoustic is not that much of a problem, and I would use them to house Auralex 2'x4'x2" boards. Without cutting the boards, I will probably have to use 1"x2" in the similar way Taz has used with 1"x3" to make some bigger frames between columns...

Many thanks for the good ideas and info.
post #526 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by minyime View Post

Real nice....

Many thanks for the good ideas and info.

That is what the forum is all about, the exchange of information. This forum was the initial inspiration for a home theater. The very first affordable Home theater is saw was the "Nate" built by David Bott. From there is was all down hill. But this forum provides direction, information, material selection and inspiration.
post #527 of 897
I have been looking over this thread for months and will begin soon. I do have a questions about the frames. I will probably build my frames as 2'x4' and wanted to know why I couldn't use 2"x2" and run the edges through a table saw to get the beveled edge?
post #528 of 897
Sotwell,

Your question was already asked (a few times) in thread. You can make your frames anyway you want. It typically gets down to what equipment the homeowner has and how comfortable they are with woodworking.... and what their expectations are. Greg mentioned early on that in order to get the results he was looking for he had to go with a routered edge. He also only wanted his frames to be 1" thick. You can make your's whatever size you want.

I will caution you that larger frames will bow under the stress of pulling frabric across them so you may need additional supports. I just built some hinged frames for my stage to cover the LR speakers. The frames were made out of 1x2's and are 17"x75". I had to put one support in the center to keep them square.

Best of luck. Bud
post #529 of 897
Has anyone tried this source for Frames/Fabric?

They sell pre-cut, built, bevelled wood frames, pre-built panels, even pre-sewed "pillowcase" style fabric for direct use on 4'x2'x1" or 2" or 4" OC703 / absorbtion material of your choice! Cheap!

http://www.acoustimac.com

The only thing I don't see is a fire rating, and I was wondering if anyone has seen the "pillowcase" finished product. They also sell corner straighteners/reinforcers, and to attach them to the wall, screw-on impaling clips and metal slip clip thingies.

The material looks better than GOM from the website pictures and is available in some dark colors that GOM is not!
post #530 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krep View Post

Has anyone tried this source for Frames/Fabric?


http://www.acoustimac.com

Looks like a great resource even for the DIY'er. They will even build the frames for you.
post #531 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sotwell View Post

I have been looking over this thread for months and will begin soon. I do have a questions about the frames. I will probably build my frames as 2'x4' and wanted to know why I couldn't use 2"x2" and run the edges through a table saw to get the beveled edge?

Here is a photos of frames make out of plywood on edge. You can make it any depth you want. They might bow when you pull the fabric, but you can make them exactly 1" or 2" deep and not be concerned with the thickness of the material. Photo borrowed from acoustimac.com.

post #532 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Here is a photos of frames make out of plywood on edge. You can make it any depth you want. They might bow when you pull the fabric, but you can make them exactly 1" or 2" deep and not be concerned with the thickness of the material. Photo borrowed from acoustimac.com.


If the frame is a near perfect match to the 2'x4' OC703 or what not panel, which is semi-rigid, do you think the panel itself would provide enough support to prevent bowing? (just wondering)

Another idea I thought about was instead of cutting a bevel, to buy 2 boards for each edge; a 3"x1 (which is really 2.5") and a 1"x1 (which is really 1.5"). Then glue the two boards together with the 1x1 approximately in the center of the 3x1. This configuration would give the appearance (under fabric) of a beveled edge, and would probably be extremely rigid (sort of an I-joist), fairly cheap, and would avoid the need for a table saw or router to get the bevelled edge. Not sure if the finished product would actually look good though.

Eventually I'll stop lurking and build something... I still have a few other projects to finish in my media room before I get to the fabric frames...
post #533 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by krep View Post

If the frame is a near perfect match to the 2'x4' OC703 or what not panel, which is semi-rigid, do you think the panel itself would provide enough support to prevent bowing? (just wondering)

If you build a frame, you are going to want to wrap it in fabric prior to inserting the OC703. The tighter you pull the fabric, the more bowing you are going to get with the frame members on edge.

I built my frames out of strips of mdf on edge, which were about as stiff as a wet noodle. The first frame I wrapped had about 1/2" worth of bow in it. I just removed several staples, and inserted a couple of cross members, and re stapled using less pull.

Link to backside of panel with cross members

This made all the difference in the world. I think with some of my panels, I just used a single cross member, and got better at not over tightening. For smaller panels, there is no problem.
post #534 of 897
Thread Starter 
You need to pull the fabric tight enough not to sag. But not too tight. If you over pull the fabric you will get stretch ripples in addition to bowing the frame.
post #535 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krep View Post

If the frame is a near perfect match to the 2'x4' OC703 or what not panel, which is semi-rigid, do you think the panel itself would provide enough support to prevent bowing? (just wondering)

Another idea I thought about was instead of cutting a bevel, to buy 2 boards for each edge; a 3"x1 (which is really 2.5") and a 1"x1 (which is really 1.5"). Then glue the two boards together with the 1x1 approximately in the center of the 3x1. This configuration would give the appearance (under fabric) of a beveled edge, and would probably be extremely rigid (sort of an I-joist), fairly cheap, and would avoid the need for a table saw or router to get the bevelled edge. Not sure if the finished product would actually look good though.

Eventually I'll stop lurking and build something... I still have a few other projects to finish in my media room before I get to the fabric frames...

If you do not want to use a table saw or router you could do a composite edge something like was discussed in message number 165
post #536 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

If you do not want to use a table saw or router you could do a composite edge something like was discussed in message number 165

LOL. Good point, I think I read that one some time ago and forgot about it / stored it in my subconscious.
post #537 of 897
I have another technique to suggest over my previous points that I just added to my build thread. If you want to build frames thinner than I did for my squares, you might consider doing what I did for the frames covering my bass traps. I built them out of really cheap 1x3s and used metal ties to screw them together. They were really easy to build and I didn't need to worry about using a router or building a composite frame. A table saw and chop saw did the job pretty quickly.





If you want your frames to be thicker than the 5/8" or so thick a 1x is, you could use a 1x and cut the 45 off to get the beveled look and then nail a thin 3/8" strip on the back to increase the thickness.
post #538 of 897
Thread Starter 
Here is the first of several photos taken by Dan Phan, he is a pro. The photo shoot lasted about three and a half hours where Dan took hunberds of photos, testing lighting and shot composition.

After all the shot were thaken he then picke the best and then went to his Apple Mac and started to use several applictions to darkroom the photos. The one below is the first one that is total ready. And they are a lot better then the one i took in post 515.

post #539 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Here is a photo of a frame that is half solid (right side) and half Linacoustics (The black stuff on the left). The Linacoustics is just pressed into the frame. Friction holds it in place. The solid side is the MDF side for an electrical outlet.

Hope this helps.


Is that an outlet/low volt box I see in that frame? Even if not, when you had things like light switch boxes and outlets, how did you stretch the GOM and make it work? I have no trouble stretching the GOM across the 4 outside corners of the frame, but then trying to make the inside 4 corners of the outlet openings, it bunches up.
post #540 of 897
if u are going to build a frame with straight edges (90 degree), is there any need to use mdf or is just plywood ok?

also if i plan to place 1" linacoustic in the frame, should i build a frame 1" thick or 1.25" thick?

thanks for any help
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