or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fabric Frames - Page 19

post #541 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleachum View Post

if u are going to build a frame with straight edges (90 degree), is there any need to use mdf or is just plywood ok?

Check my posts #516 and #537 to see if that gives you any better ideas. If you're going to build 1" frames, I think you could try using 1x3 furring strips like I did. I'm not sure if you cut them down to 1" and stood them on their edges if that would be sturdy enough. If you lay them down flat, you'll need to add an additional layer of wood to make them 1" thick but that should be easy to attach.

Or two layers of 1/2" plywood would probably by fine too. I don't really see the need for MDF, even to get the beveled edge which I did without MDF.
post #542 of 897
Gpowers,

Just saw the write on your space, very nice and Congratulations!

It was a nice write up and they did a nice job of capturing the space in the pics.
post #543 of 897
Thread Starter 
Article in Electronic House hit today:

http://www.electronichouse.com/artic...ith_fabric/D2/
post #544 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

Gpowers,

Just saw the write on your space, very nice and Congratulations!

It was a nice write up and they did a nice job of capturing the space in the pics.

Thanks, the photos were taken by Dan Phan. He is our lead Designer here at Work. I took some photos originally and they were all the wrong lighting, too yellow. Dan had all the tools to do the job right.
post #545 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleachum View Post

if u are going to build a frame with straight edges (90 degree), is there any need to use mdf or is just plywood ok?

also if i plan to place 1" linacoustic in the frame, should i build a frame 1" thick or 1.25" thick?

thanks for any help

Mine were slightly less the and inch deep and I used 1" Linacoustic.

I would build a test frame the way you want. Cover it with fabric and see if you like the end product. If it works for you then your ready to go.
post #546 of 897
Thread Starter 
shawnwalters: Is that an outlet/low volt box I see in that frame?

GPowers: Yep. it is being used and a box extender. It mates up to an existing box in the wall.

shawnwalters: Even if not, when you had things like light switch boxes and outlets, how did you stretch the GOM and make it work?

GPowers: You do not need to be exact as the faceplate overlaps the box whole a little. I cut a V in each of the corners, then wrap the fabric from the front to the back and staple it.

shawnwalters: I have no trouble stretching the GOM across the 4 outside corners of the frame, but then trying to make the inside 4 corners of the outlet openings, it bunches up.

GPowers: By cutting the V's in the corners it will not bunch up.
post #547 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

shawnwalters: Is that an outlet/low volt box I see in that frame?

GPowers: Yep. it is being used and a box extender. It mates up to an existing box in the wall.

shawnwalters: Even if not, when you had things like light switch boxes and outlets, how did you stretch the GOM and make it work?

GPowers: You do not need to be exact as the faceplate overlaps the box whole a little. I cut a V in each of the corners, then wrap the fabric from the front to the back and staple it.

shawnwalters: I have no trouble stretching the GOM across the 4 outside corners of the frame, but then trying to make the inside 4 corners of the outlet openings, it bunches up.

GPowers: By cutting the V's in the corners it will not bunch up.

Thank you. I ended up doing the "V" cuts on the internal corners and it worked great.
post #548 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR View Post

Here's a view of my finished theater after much work. Greg, you were one of the people who really inspired me;

Robert never realized that you are right here in Southern California and the we both used Doug to fine tune our projectors. You are just to the east of us.
post #549 of 897
Thread Starter 
Started replumbing the bathroom that is outside of the theater. I never realized how much plumbing when into body sprays in a shower.

post #550 of 897
I'm not a plumber, but that looks like way more joints than are needed. I would think you could do the same thing with one cross and two elbows. Is it for more even distribution of water to the 3 heads?
post #551 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whumpf View Post

I'm not a plumber, but that looks like way more joints than are needed. I would think you could do the same thing with one cross and two elbows. Is it for more even distribution of water to the 3 heads?

yep, that is what the plumber said. If you did a manifold it would over pressure the first head and the last head would just drible...... The method used in the picture creates even pressure to all three heads.
post #552 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post


Hi GPowers -
Great thread and impressive theater!

One thought on this image, coming from an aspiring pro photographer... usually in architecture shots, it's desirable to keep vertical lines vertical, ie not converging or diverging (I believe the term is parallax.) They even make special tilt/shift lenses which can be bought (or rented for the occasional job) which allow you to tilt the lens for composition purposes but keep the sensor or film plane parallel with vertical to address the lines.

You can also use stitching software and a tripod and a longer lens. The longer the lens you use the more frames you will need to stitch, but the less distortion will be present.

Love your setup! If we weren't on opposite coasts I'd offer to take some photos myself
post #553 of 897
was thinking of doing this finish to my theater when I started a long time ago .. but lost the thread.. not to fear.. I just tagged ya...
post #554 of 897
Hlomax - I highly recommend Gregg's frames. I'm just finishing my theater.... 68 frames and it worked out fantastically. We are really, really pleased with the results.

And... we are 15 miles outside of Pittsburgh!

I will post pictures as soon as I can get good enough ones that how well the room looks in person.

Bud
post #555 of 897
I am planning on similar frames as well, but a modified version. My frames will be 3'x6' with 3 stacked on top of each other to fill a 9' wall. I will have columns in between each "row".
post #556 of 897
Keep in mind what material you are going to cover them with. I wasn't sure what I was going to use and I built my panels 64" tall. When it came time to cover them, GOM was the only material I could find wide enough to cover without wasting a lot or having a seem. I think most of the GOM is 66" wide. Just something to think about.
post #557 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by budk View Post

Hlomax - I highly recommend Gregg's frames. I'm just finishing my theater.... 68 frames and it worked out fantastically. We are really, really pleased with the results.

And... we are 15 miles outside of Pittsburgh!

I will post pictures as soon as I can get good enough ones that how well the room looks in person.

Bud

I will look into that.. Thanks.
Which side of Pgh.
I and the wife are from East Pgh.
Braddock and Plum Boro. but we have now moved to Atlanta Ga.
family still there though so we are up there often.
post #558 of 897
Yes, the frame size is important if you want to make the most efficient use of whatever material you are using to cover them.

Greg (or is it Gregg ?) made that point clear in one of his early posts and it stuck in my head long enough for me to remember it whenever it came time to do my panels.

I believe the nominal dimensions of my panels are 21-3/8" x 30-3/8". The 30-3/8" dim is the critical one and it allows you to get two panels out of a 66" wide piece of GOM, assuming a thickness of 1"... just barely.

I also modified Greg's design slightly by mounting my frames using french cleats on all but the top row of frames. I was going to use glue and nails like Greg suggested however the material that I used was not able to hide the nails so I had to find another solution.

Hlomax - we're on the complete other side of Pgh - south and west of the city down rt.79.
post #559 of 897
Here is my implementation of Greg's frame design. The photo's aren't great as the color is way off.... my frames are not this red and my columns are darker grey than they appear in the photos. The room is only 10ft wide but the photo's make it look even smaller. I also need to get a wider angle lense.

Thanks for the inspiration Greg.











post #560 of 897
Tip-top stuff Bud.
post #561 of 897
Very nice! Nice clean lines.
post #562 of 897
love the door.
post #563 of 897
Thanks for the comments. I'll start my own thread when I get new pics.

The door is more complex than it looks... while being simple at the same time. It's a standard, steel door so it has full weatherstripping with a threshold.

But the inside face of the door sat back about 2-1/2" from the other frames in the room. Because of that setback, if I just mounted frames to the door I would have had to leave a 3" gap on the right side (hinge side) so that the frames would clear the door frame.

What I decided I wanted to do was to have the frames the full width of the door but have them slide out away from the hinge as the door is opened and then move back into position as the door was closed.

How I did it was to mount 2, 24" wide ball bearing chassis slides to the inside face of the door. Then I mounted a piece of 1/2" MDF to the mating pieces of the chassis slides and then mounted the frames to the MDF with french cleats and velcro. So the mdf (with the frames attached) was now able to move left and right. I rigged up a pivot hinge and piece of steel angle and mounted that angle to the door and the pivot hinge to the door frame. You can see it on the right side of the door.

So, when I open the door the mdf panel slowly moves the about 1.5" or so automatically to the left which is just enough for the frames to clear the hinge side of door frame when the door is open 90 degrees.

I had to buy 2 sets of door knobs and weld them together to get a shaft that would span the entire 4" or so of door thickness.

It's pretty cool and a subtle detail that I am proud of. Thanks again.
post #564 of 897
EXCELLENT work Bud. Start a thread and post some photos of the door treatment install if you could. I'm looking to do something similar and sure could use a path to folllow.

CJ
post #565 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by budk View Post

Here is my implementation of Greg's frame design. The photo's aren't great as the color is way off.... my frames are not this red and my columns are darker grey than they appear in the photos. The room is only 10ft wide but the photo's make it look even smaller. I also need to get a wider angle lense.

Thanks for the inspiration Greg.

You are welcome. I would not have a Home Theater ether if it was not for all the great information on this Forum. I found a lot of inspiration here.

Your theater looks great. I too like the door. Plus it is nice too see a fellow CRT user. Now start watching some movies.
post #566 of 897
Thanks Greg!
post #567 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by budk View Post


Greg (or is it Gregg ?)

Just Greg, no double gg stuff. Thanks
post #568 of 897
I gotta say, it was great to have Greg over to my my place. He's a really nice guy, full of enthusiasm and knowledge. I owe much to him for how well my theater turned out.

What projector is that, Bud? I love the black color!
post #569 of 897
Thread Starter 
Mine is a little older then yours, robert. It is a NEC 9pg plus. One thing we do have in common is that Doug has worked on both of our projectors and we both have Moone HDMI cards.

Again thanks for opening up your home to us all, and your wife put on one fine lunch.

Bud, Painting the plastic case black is a neat idea. Is the paint holding up, or dose it chip easy?
post #570 of 897
RobertR - my projector is a Barco 1208s/e

I painted the projector flat black.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home