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Fabric Frames - Page 21

post #601 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffC View Post

If I were to build the theater today I would use the plastic strips that are now available to the DIY'er


any more info on this product?

Sorry I thought that was already answered. Some suppliers are:

http://www.fabricmate.com/

http://www.zeronoise.com/

http://www.wallmate.net/

Fab-Trax

Or do a Google search for "fabric track "
post #602 of 897
Thanks! I was thinking this was something different. Thanks for the links
Jeff
post #603 of 897
has anyone tried hanging these frames with a nail gun using GOM Anchorage fabric? I have read that most have hung these using a nailer but using GOM 701, I will be using Anchorage and was curious if the nail would sink below the Anchorage like the 701?
post #604 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sotwell View Post

has anyone tried hanging these frames with a nail gun using GOM Anchorage fabric? I have read that most have hung these using a nailer but using GOM 701, I will be using Anchorage and was curious if the nail would sink below the Anchorage like the 701?

I used the Spinel line of GOM and had no problems.
post #605 of 897
I used Anchorage on my frames - and I did not nail it because I was concerned you would see the nail head or it would cause the fabric to be pulled. There is a big difference between Anchorage and the Spinel I used on my columns and the 701 I used on the screenwall and on the soffits.

I used a french cleat to hang my frames. I used the same plywood/mdf sandwidch as Greg but I made the top side of my frames 3" wide instead of 2" (like the other 3 sides). Then, I simply ripped a french cleat out of the plywood layer of the top side, and marked it so each french cleat stayed with the frame it was ripped from. I did this just to make sure it matched.

I glued and nailed each french cleat to the walls as I hung the uncovered frames. After I had them all hung, I was able to lift off all the frames and then I covered each one starting at the bottom of the wall and working around the room row by row.

Now, I am able to easily remove any frame if it gets damaged just by lifting off the frames above it.

Best of luck.
post #606 of 897
I appologize if this was covered, but how did you get the beveled corners? I had planned on running my boards through a table router with a 45 degree bit and then screwing them together. But, this will not take care of the corners. What am I missing?
post #607 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by sotwell View Post

I appologize if this was covered, but how did you get the beveled corners? I had planned on running my boards through a table router with a 45 degree bit and then screwing them together. But, this will not take care of the corners. What am I missing?


Be careful where the screws are, then run the whole frame through the router.

You can use pocket holes in the backside to screw together, or use 2 layers to make the full frame, with the corners overlapping, use glue (stronger than screws when dry), and a few brads to hold until dry. then route away.
post #608 of 897
so its better to build the frame first (i like the pocket hole jig idea) and then run the assembled frame throught the router?
post #609 of 897
I think it is easier.
post #610 of 897
I glued and brad nailed my frames together first.

Then I used a jointer as needed to trim the frames to fit and line up with the adjacent frames. You have to allow a certain amount of room for the fabric so the jointer was used on almost every panel.

Once they were all fitted, then I ran them through the router table.
post #611 of 897
budk - when you brad nailed, did you miter cut or just flat? Where did you place the brads to avoid the router from hitting them? What is a jointer? Sounds like something from college
post #612 of 897
I would think 2 layers of frame would make it stronger than mitering. Two 1/2" layers will make up your 1" depth, make the edges overlap.

A jointer is a tool that shaves a narorw bit of wood off, kind of like sanding, just not as smooth and allot quicker, more like an electric hand plane. Remember, if you are building a 2 frames that cover 4 feet, you actually need the frames to be just smaller than 2 feet each, the fabric has a thickness that must be taken into account. Bud is building it to measured size, then shaving just a little off to take this into account.

Try looking way back in this thread, I think GPowers did the multiple layers overlapping, and has great pics of it all.
post #613 of 897
I had planned on not doing the overlaping 2 layer method. My local lumber yard carries 5/4" board which actually measures 1'. For free, they will rip a 5/4"x4" board for me. This should save a lot of time not ripping plywood/mdf. Now I just need to figure out how to assemble my cut 5/4 boards.
post #614 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sotwell View Post

I appologize if this was covered, but how did you get the beveled corners? I had planned on running my boards through a table router with a 45 degree bit and then screwing them together. But, this will not take care of the corners. What am I missing?

All the fabric frames were assembled first, Then the edges we run through the router. Actuality I clamped down the frame and ran the router over the frames. I do not have a decent router table.

Ony the edges that butted up to one another were routed. If the edge butted up to the soffit, floor, column or corner the edge was not cut to a 45 degree angle. They were left square.

Another option is too leave all the edges square and create a space between the frames. Look at the photos in post number 599.

Hope this helps.
post #615 of 897
I did mine almost exactly like gpowers, except I incorporated a french cleat into each frame. So, I cut the boards to the nominal length and used a self-squaring jig and glued and brad nailed the sandwich of mdf and plywood together.

Then I fit them on the wall and if they needed trimming to allow for fabric, I ran the edges through a cheap jointer.

I made a router table out of scrap wood so that I would have a big surface to lay the frames on and frankly there were many times that my router bit cut right through a brad, even though I tried to keep the brads away from the edges to be routered as much as possible. I also followed Greg's lead and only routered the edges that butted against other panels.

I purposely did not use 5/4 wood because my experience with solid wood like that is that it tends to warp easier than the sandwich of mdf/plywood. Also, and maybe more importantly, the sandwich idea provided a easy way to build the frame.

Looking back, building and fitting the frames was probably the best part of the build... I was dreading doing it but once I had a system in place it was "fun" and it certainly provides a Wow factor to the room... especially whenever I tell everyone that I built them.
post #616 of 897
Anyone have any luck using the Fabric-track type product?
post #617 of 897
Yes, I used Fabricmate track on the underside of some of my soffits and I used it extensively on the top of the stage.

It's pretty expensive but it works great and gives you the ability to easily replace the fabric if it gets damaged.
post #618 of 897
where did you guys get the 1" batting for the top frames?
post #619 of 897
I think I found mine online, but you can usually get it at any fabric store including Walmart. Sometimes it's only a 1/2" thick but you can double it up to get to the 1" thickness.
post #620 of 897
Bud - do you recall where you bought it? I just got back from walmart and I am going to end up spending more on the batting than the linacoustic.
post #621 of 897
Sotwell - I'm sorry but I do not recall where I bought it. Where ever it was, it came in a roll that was 48" wide and probably 100ft long. I ended up giving what was left, which was about 75% of it, to my sister for use in quilting.

Did you look at JoAnn Fabric or other similar stores. I don't remember it costing much $ at all.
post #622 of 897
If you have a JoAnn's Fabric, get on their mail list. Or have your wife do it. They always have 40-50% off coupons for a regular priced item.
post #623 of 897
I was curious if anyone knew the answer to this question? I have 14 extra acoustic ceiling tiles 2x2 ft. and was considering covering them with fabric as my wall panels? would this benefit my sound at all or just be decoration? They are a 1/2 inch thick and I was going to use 2 per panel...any help would be greatly appreciated. Just trying to save a lil $$$
here is a link to the tiles I have and they won't take them back so I'm trying to make use
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...949&lpage=none
post #624 of 897
They will likely be no different than just having drywall. I assume they are very dense which would do nothing positive for your acoustics.
post #625 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by budk View Post

They will likely be no different than just having drywall. I assume they are very dense which would do nothing positive for your acoustics.

yes they are kinda dense I figured I would give it a shot???
post #626 of 897
They are dense to act as a (poor) barrier to sound transmission when used in a drop ceiling. They are not going to provide the treatment you are likely looking for.
post #627 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by budk View Post

They are dense to act as a barrier to sound transmission when used in a drop ceiling. They are not going to provide the treatment you are likely looking for.

Thank you very much for the quick reply I looked everywhere to try to find the answer
post #628 of 897
I've got something like this http://img.archiexpo.com/images_ae/p...nel-146276.jpg on my walls and I would like to try and do what the OP has done but I don't think I can use glue (I think it won't stick on the these panels?) and if I use nails that will look bad.

Any ideas on what I can do? Or if glue (or a particular type of glue) would work?
post #629 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Decadent_Spectre View Post

I've got something like this http://img.archiexpo.com/images_ae/p...nel-146276.jpg on my walls and I would like to try and do what the OP has done but I don't think I can use glue (I think it won't stick on the these panels?) and if I use nails that will look bad.

Any ideas on what I can do? Or if glue (or a particular type of glue) would work?

I did not glue the compressed fiberglass to the wall just the wood frame. so if you build wood frames you should be OK.
post #630 of 897
Thread Starter 
Built a Poster light box baised on chinadog game box design.







Thanks for the design Bud. So far the wood construction is working out great, Need to buy some rope lights and some diffuser film and then mount the poster frame to the wall.

This has been a project that has been on the back burner for a long time. Thought I was going to do this over Christmas but just got to it this weekend.
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