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Fabric Frames - Page 24

post #691 of 897
Walking down the basement stairs, this is what you see first:



Standing in the arcade looking toward the lobby entrance door:



Walking through the above door leads to the lobby:



You can see the door you just walked through on the right. The flash really highlights the fabric stretch marks. You can't see these in normal light.

Closeup shot of the door:




Once again, the door leaving the lobby is in the corner (to the left of the trash can)

Lara Croft tries (succesfully I might add) to entice you into the theater:


The GrafikEye and HVAC rheostats are to the left of this communicating door.

This is my equipment closet (in the corner of the lobby to the left of the GrafikEye) with the doors closed:



Doors opened:



My passively cooled Emotiva amp is very sensitive to heat whereas the Carvin 900 wpc pro amp for the IB sub had no problem with heat since it has a high speed thermally controlled fan. I have solved the Emotiva amp thermal issues by adding a cheap 8" inline fan to my HVAC return ducting which already has a much nicer Fantech 8" inline fan that runs the deadvent. The lobby is "downstream" from the theater and I had a 4" passive return vent in the closet but it needed a little boost to move enough air since I didn't want to reduce the return capability in the theater.

If you look closely you can also see that I added (3) 80mm computer fans on top of the Emotiva amp pulling air across the unit. The 8" inline fan and these 3 fans weren't enough to solve the problem with the doors closed. I added (2) 120mm computer fans that literally sit face down on the amp pulling air out of the amp housing and this did the job. I doubt I need the (3) 80mm fans but they are quiet, so I just left them there.

If you look at the picture with the doors closed you can see a vent at the bottom that allows cool air to be pulled into the closet.
post #692 of 897
Once you walk past Lara Croft through the communicating doors you enter the theater. If you walk down the aisle to the screen and turn around, this is what you will see:



This is the right hand side of the theater, while looking at the screen, and you can see the door next to the bass trap in the corner. The doors have panels on them but I had to end them short so they wouldn't hit the bass trap when the door is opened. All 3 doors close automatically btw.

Other aisle looking toward back of the theater:



Note the jack pack at the bottom of the column.

Standing in the left hand aisle looking across the riser to the right hand wall:



Opposite wall:



Rear bass trap is visible in the corner.

Crappy picture of the pj box:



Once again, the flash lights up the fabric frame crossmembers and even the scrim behind the back wall panels. These can't be seen in normal lighting and if you turn on the pj, you can't look back without seeing a beam of light!

I should paint the inside of the pj box, but once again, if the pj is on, you can't see in here, even if you try. Since the pj is off, you can see a portion of the Panamorph UH480 sitting on it's sled (left side of opening) and on the right you can see the sled housing. When I select stretch mode on the JVC RS20, the sled automatically slides into the light path. Very neat IMO.

Self explanatory shot:













I added fidelio velvet on the curved soffit in front of the screen and black GOM on the wall panels immediately to the left and right of the screen. I'm glad I did this as I am very pleased with the contrast of the pj.
post #693 of 897
Arcade shots:



The white door in the distance leads to the lobby.

Driving cabinet:



The large box behind the driving cabinet is a 27" RGB CRT monitor that will be installed in a standup arcade (my next project!) that will go on this wall:



The standup arcade cabinet will be centered on this wall and once complete, I have some Asteroids stickers to compliment the Space Invaders that you now see.

MAME Cocktail cabinet that plays vertical games only:



I added Austin Powers so my wife wouldn't get too mad when she sees Lara Croft in the lobby, although she does turn her around quite often. Behind Austin is the supply deadvent. The return deadvent is in the mechanical room.



Door on the left leads to the laundry room, excercise room and mechanical room. I need to get an "Employees Only" sign for this door. The door on the right is the bathroom and needs a restroom type sign. I just leave it open now when guests come. There's a flat panel monitor in the bathroom btw, in addition to the monitor in the lobby and one on the back wall of the theater. So far, guests get a kick out of going to get popcorn, candy or sitting on the crapper and still being able to watch and hear the movie.

It's official:




That was probably too many photos?...I just finished my theater, so I'm a little excited, please accept my apologies.
post #694 of 897
can you make me those fabric panels and mail them to me
post #695 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmalloc View Post
i love that red theater
Thanks man it has been a long time coming! Learned a lot a long the too!
post #696 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjambro View Post


Doors opened:



What king of hinge did you use for the equipment door. It looks like you can not see the hinges when the door is close. ar the total invisable whit the door closed?

I never like the way my doors are hinged. But I do have 90 degree partitions at each edge of the opening.

Maybe yhe hinges you used would work?
post #697 of 897
How about using concealed cup hinges?



(they're available a lot cheaper elsewhere, but Rockler had a nice picture)
post #698 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

What king of hinge did you use for the equipment door. It looks like you can not see the hinges when the door is close. ar the total invisable whit the door closed?

Brad beat me to it. They look just like the picture he posted and are the type of hinges found on kitchen cabinets. You can pick them up at any big box home improvement store. I like them and like you noticed, they can't be seen at all when the doors are closed.
post #699 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjambro View Post

Brad beat me to it. They look just like the picture he posted and are the type of hinges found on kitchen cabinets. You can pick them up at any big box home improvement store. I like them and like you noticed, they can't be seen at all when the doors are closed.

Your doors are in a spot like mine. Between a column and a wall. I see you add a vertical strip on eh left. I think that makes the difference and allows space for the door to open.

I was trying to make it work with out the space to the left. The hinge would some ho compensate for the close clearance?
post #700 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Your doors are in a spot like mine. Between a column and a wall. I see you add a vertical strip on eh left. I think that makes the difference and allows space for the door to open.

I was trying to make it work with out the space to the left. The hinge would some ho compensate for the close clearance?

I really wanted my doors to open to the right into the corner but with the thickness of the doors (full thickness fabric panels) I figured I would be better off opening to the left. I would definitely have less space to roll the rack in and out.

Having said that, I don't think the hinges require much clearance past the outside edge of the panel (door), but I wouldn't feel comfortable with less than 1/2" clearance but that's just me. The hinges do have a little room for adjustment but not much. Mine open a little past 90 degrees (105 degrees?) which does help. I hope that helps.
post #701 of 897
Thanks to Greg for pioneering the original design on building a fabric frame theater, I designed the Flying Pig Cinema.



























In many of the pictures, the camera flash causes the wood frame to be seen through the fabric. But obviously, you don't see it with normal lights on.

On my construction thread you can see how I made the frames for my unique situation in the basement.

I love the way it turned out.

Thanks to Greg and all the other builds I drew ideas and inspiration from to make my theater a reality.

Pete
post #702 of 897
hmmm..lot to read for me...any guide how easy to read this..
post #703 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Pete View Post
Thanks to Greg for pioneering the original design on building a fabric frame theater, I designed the Flying Pig Cinema.

In many of the pictures, the camera flash causes the wood frame to be seen through the fabric. But obviously, you don't see it with normal lights on.

On my construction thread you can see how I made the frames for my unique situation in the basement.

I love the way it turned out.

Thanks to Greg and all the other builds I drew ideas and inspiration from to make my theater a reality.

Pete
Peter that is a huge space and a great looking theater. Lots of fabric frames thanks for posting the photos.
post #704 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Pete View Post

Thanks to Greg for pioneering the original design on building a fabric frame theater, I designed the Flying Pig Cinema.

In many of the pictures, the camera flash causes the wood frame to be seen through the fabric. But obviously, you don't see it with normal lights on.

On my construction thread you can see how I made the frames for my unique situation in the basement.

I love the way it turned out.

Thanks to Greg and all the other builds I drew ideas and inspiration from to make my theater a reality.

Pete

Love the Beatles wall. Frames look great but not a fan of the wood on the bottom of the room.
post #705 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmove View Post

... but not a fan of the wood on the bottom of the room.

Not sure how that is going to work with acoustic management, you might have problems with bass. The lower section of the wall is where all the compressed fiberglass is to help control the bass.
post #706 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

There have been several question about the frames and how the corners are joined and how the bevels are done. So this weekend when i was fixing some of the very first frames I made i took some additional photos of the corners. The photo shows the lap joint with the MDF and plywood and shows one beveled edge.


Greg,
In trying to understand how the corners of your frames are joined, and looking at post 188, I see you have overlapped the 2 layers. Is that what you mean by "lap joint" or did you actually cut a half-lap joint in each board? If not, how did you attach the corners to make each frame layer? I know you have already addressed this, but I'm still a little confused. (btw, your room continues to be a great inspiration & I am getting close to diving in.)
post #707 of 897
They are regular lap joints, not half lap - 1/2" layer laying on top of another 1/2" layer in the corners.

Here's a picture of a corner on one of my panels, which are created the same way, except plywood+plywood instead of plywood+mdf:

post #708 of 897
Thanks Brad - I could see it even better in the pic before this one in your thread. Did you use stacked dado or just a saw blade? Great work on your project!
post #709 of 897
he used neither. just rip your 1/2" material to about 1 1/2" wide. then make a 90 degree angle with 2 of them. your depth is still 1/2". now place 2 more boards on top, your depth is now 1", it is called a lap joint because the joint are overlapped, they do not line up.
Imagine a brick wall pattern. The mortar is never in a vertical line from 1 row to another. That is what you are doing here.
post #710 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by avsinkhole View Post

Thanks Brad - I could see it even better in the pic before this one in your thread. Did you use stacked dado or just a saw blade? Great work on your project!

You are trying to make it too complicated. The photo shows a very simple joint.

At the time when I was building the fabric frames my woodworking skills were very limited. so these lap joints are nothing fancy. No expensive Dado blades or anything like that. Just simple square end cuts. The two pieces of material (Plywood and MDF) were just over lapped on the corners then glued and nailed.

This allowed me to use a speed square in each corner to square up each corner even if the material was not square. There is a lot of slop allowed in lapping the corners like this.

Today I would have made a jig to to square up the joints. But the speed square worked great and all the fabric frame corners look nice and square in the theater.
post #711 of 897
Well - talk about overthinking! Thanks Greg and Chia. I get it now. It just never occurred to me to attach in that manner, since I've never layered material like that. I was all set to biscuit join. But it is now clear to me that I can save myself a ton of work with no loss of precision and integrity.
post #712 of 897
I just went thru many pages of this thread and by looking at all the HT's the quality/craftmanship of many-many DIY people is very clear by the results here.

This is the web at its finest, people sharing and learning from each other.
If I had seen this thread 3 1/2 years ago I might have tackled a fabric frame theatre build....anyways just saying great job to the people who've tackled this HT style as DIY.
post #713 of 897
I also have some pics of the joints in my thread (a few pages back from the emd) if interested. Did mine the same way but laminated as well

Cheers
post #714 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by avsinkhole View Post

Well - talk about overthinking! Thanks Greg and Chia. I get it now. It just never occurred to me to attach in that manner, since I've never layered material like that. I was all set to biscuit join. But it is now clear to me that I can save myself a ton of work with no loss of precision and integrity.

Agreed that there a lot of different ways to do this, biscuits would work, mitered corners, half-laps, Festools Dominos, Kreg pocket holes, butt joint, mortise & tenon or something else.

For me, at the time, the lapped corners was the simplest way, that offered repeatability for 80 plus frames. And since it was ALL covered with fabric I did not need to make a fancy time consuming joints.
post #715 of 897
And this way does not need allot of tools. Table saw to rip your pieces, glue the frames up. I used a pin nailer to hold it together until the glue dries. About 4 in the corners and 1 every 6-8 inches along the strips.
post #716 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Not sure how that is going to work with acoustic management, you might have problems with bass. The lower section of the wall is where all the compressed fiberglass is to help control the bass.

I understand your concern, but the design has not had any acoustic problems. Because it is also a game room, I wanted a more durable bottom section for those accidental kicks. Every corner of the room has a bass trap. The bead board is not just nailed to the wall, it has insulation behind and special traps in the rear of the wall. Bpape did the acoustic evaluation on the theater, and all construction is per his recommendations.


Side walls.


Rear walls with 4" 703.




Corner bass traps.
post #717 of 897
Thread Starter 
I started to look at HVLP spray paint units. The Fuji Mini-Mite 4 with a gravity feed gun looks like it is on the top of my list. Anyone here use one of these units?
post #718 of 897
No idea on the HVLP guns - but I did make some progress on my fabric frames - not quite done, but close enough to show:







post #719 of 897
Just another thumbs up and atta boy to Greg for his inspiration and his creativity. My theater never ceases to get compliments and I could not have done it without his work... not the least of which was Greg taking the time to document his theater so extensively.
post #720 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Horstkotte View Post
No idea on the HVLP guns - but I did make some progress on my fabric frames - not quite done, but close enough to show:
Very nice looking Fabric Frame theater. I like the wood trim on the column.

How high is the ceiling? Mine was limited to 9' due to the building. Looks like you is at least 10' may be more.

Again great looking theater!
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