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Fabric Frames - Page 26

post #751 of 897
Gray I've been having good luck with 23 ga slightly headed brad nails when attaching panels. Not your typical finish nail guns a pinner is lot smaller and hard to see, I've even been using it on painted molding without touch up.

Not all the pinners will shoot the slightly headed brads, this one will

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=fasco+pinner&hl=en&rlz=1W1GGIE_enUS385&prmd=imvns&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1920&bih=1001&wrapid=tlif133900869710710&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=8410698221935550963&sa=X&ei=zKbPT8voC6W02wWkgt2mDA&ved=0CFcQ8wIwAA
post #752 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

Velcro and french cleat are also two other way of attaching the frames to the wall.
Remember, I only use the brads to hold the frames while the liquid nails dry.
Thanks. I considered some of the Z-channel (metal french cleat essentially. I'm not committed enough for liquid nails I don't think biggrin.gif
post #753 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Gray I've been having good luck with 23 ga slightly headed brad nails when attaching panels. Not your typical finish nail guns a pinner is lot smaller and hard to see, I've even been using it on painted molding without touch up.
Not all the pinners will shoot the slightly headed brads, this one will
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=fasco+pinner&hl=en&rlz=1W1GGIE_enUS385&prmd=imvns&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1920&bih=1001&wrapid=tlif133900869710710&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=8410698221935550963&sa=X&ei=zKbPT8voC6W02wWkgt2mDA&ved=0CFcQ8wIwAA
Thanks B. I'll check it out. I'm also considering some of that high density crown that's designed for indirect lighting. A pin nailer will probably work well with it, too. I haven't ruled out fabric track, but I had a hardere time than expected with some test pieces. Not as easy as I expected smile.gif. I need to build a full test panel with it and try some of my real fabric before I choose one method or the other.

Thanks again, Scott
post #754 of 897
Congrats on a job well done!
post #755 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post





Cabinet are going in. This is the office area next to the theater. This is my first attempt at building case work.

These look amazing.
post #756 of 897
Thread Starter 
These cabinets are my first multi cabinet job. ~My first cabinet project was a singe two door cabinet.

There is the same size cabinet to the left. So the case work runs the full length of a 15 foot wall. It has been a slow project. Started it last year. I have the center counter top on but not the two sides. Plus I used some knock off self closing slide that I do not like. So I will be replacing the slides with Blum Blumotion slides. Tthe cost , of the slides, is enough to make you choke.

Home top finish the project this summer.
post #757 of 897
Holy crap!

I started reading this at around midnight and by the time I got through 26 pages, it was past 3am! Granted I re-read a lot of posts multiple times and took breaks to research things being talked about here. But damn, I am so tired this morning smile.gif.

The sad part is, I don't remember half the things I read, so I have to re-read it smile.gif.

Question: has anyone compiled a "DIY summary" for these? I'd love to build them and I know all instructions are here, but it'll be nice to have a one-page summary. I'll try to compile it when I do my project, but wondering if it already exists.

I tried to order already-made acoustic panels and they were going to cost me more than my receiver + subwoofer + speakers + projector + screen! I looked at those tracks that make the job really easy, but those are also fairly expensive. Once you factor everything in, it'll cost close to getting them already made.

I can make frames myself, that's not a problem. Unfortunately I cannot do bevel edges. I don't have tools or skills. It may be a good excuse to buy a table saw. I know people suggested (and some used) alternate methods, but none of them have posted a finished picture. frenchcanvas.com also sounds pretty cool, but they don't have bevel edges.
post #758 of 897
For what it's worth I made my frames a little differently.

I bought the straightest 2x4's I could find and ripped them to 1 1/8". Then I turned them sideways and ran the strips through my surface planer so they were exactly 1" thick afterwards. That gave me frame stock of 1"x 1 1/2" (factory width of 2x4). I joined the frames together with 2 Kreg pocket screws atr every joint and they are fairly solid. Some of my frames span 55" wide and I was a little concerned with bowing after the fabric was stretched but the 1 1/2" width of the frames (and that they were solid wood) seemed to work very well. (I did put spanner pieces in anyway!)

It was relatively cheap to do the frames this way and no MDF dust to deal with or gluing 1/2" sheets together for the correct thickness!

Just another option...IF you have a way to rip boards and a surface planer.
post #759 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroncoSport View Post

It was relatively cheap to do the frames this way and no MDF dust to deal with or gluing 1/2" sheets together for the correct thickness!

[sarcasm] What???? Who wouldn't want to glue together 1/2" sheets of plywood!?!?! Building frames is by far the easiest and most fun part of the whole job!!!! [/sarcasm]
post #760 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zhamid View Post

Holy crap!
I started reading this at around midnight and by the time I got through 26 pages, it was past 3am! Granted I re-read a lot of posts multiple times and took breaks to research things being talked about here. But damn, I am so tired this morning smile.gif.
The sad part is, I don't remember half the things I read, so I have to re-read it smile.gif.
Question: has anyone compiled a "DIY summary" for these? I'd love to build them and I know all instructions are here, but it'll be nice to have a one-page summary. I'll try to compile it when I do my project, but wondering if it already exists.
I tried to order already-made acoustic panels and they were going to cost me more than my receiver + subwoofer + speakers + projector + screen! I looked at those tracks that make the job really easy, but those are also fairly expensive. Once you factor everything in, it'll cost close to getting them already made.
I can make frames myself, that's not a problem. Unfortunately I cannot do bevel edges. I don't have tools or skills. It may be a good excuse to buy a table saw. I know people suggested (and some used) alternate methods, but none of them have posted a finished picture. frenchcanvas.com also sounds pretty cool, but they don't have bevel edges.

I had only basic wood working tools at the time I built the theater. The frames were build with a table saw (which I wore out during this project, it was 25 years old) and a 25 year old router. The router was busted up pretty bad too. The on-off switch did not work, I had to use a power strip as the on-off switch. Plus the height adjustment on the router was also broken. But I was able to produce 72 frames. I used the lap joint for simplicity. I did not have any skills in wood working joinery. So anyone can do this

If you had to buy an inexpensive table saw and router you could get away with spending less then $500. If you have no other need for them, sell them on craigslist and recoup 70% to 50% of the cost. So now it only cost you maybe $200 or $300.

You just need to get out there, get started and do it.
post #761 of 897
+1, I used a $50 circular saw and $20 clamp on rip guide to build my frames, I don't have a table saw. After the first ten frames or so, I did upgrade to a brad nailer instead of using boxes of brad nails and a hammer. Takes a while to get them all built, but it becomes sort of hypnotic once you get into it.
post #762 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Horstkotte View Post

+1, I used a $50 circular saw and $20 clamp on rip guide to build my frames, I don't have a table saw. After the first ten frames or so, I did upgrade to a brad nailer instead of using boxes of brad nails and a hammer. Takes a while to get them all built, but it becomes sort of hypnotic once you get into it.

I look for excuses to buy tools. I have multiple circular saws but I think I'll use a miter saw for this. Time to buy a router. A router with bevel bit will make the job significantly easier.

I may just use 1x1 for the job. More expensive but local HomeDepot charges $1 / cut beyond first 5.

I know it's a lot of work but now that I figured out how to do it (and now that I've seen your result and have designed my room in photoshop), I can't wait to get started!
post #763 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zhamid View Post

I may just use 1x1 for the job. More expensive but local HomeDepot charges $1 / cut beyond first 5.

I have seen Home Depot employees cut an entire project for some customers. I asked him why he cut the entire project for the customer, tons of cuts over the 5 most on the panel saw, and he said he enjoys cutting projects.
post #764 of 897
How many of these did you insulate? If I insulate none then I'll have an echo. If I insulate them all then the sound will just die. How many should I insulate and where should they go (random? corners? middle? Etc).
post #765 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zhamid View Post

How many of these did you insulate? If I insulate none then I'll have an echo. If I insulate them all then the sound will just die. How many should I insulate and where should they go (random? corners? middle? Etc).

It has been a long time since I did the theater but as I remember reading somewhere the lower half of the wall has compressed fiberglass and the top half has a poly batten. The front wall, behind the screen is compressed fiberglass top to bottom.
post #766 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by zhamid View Post

How many of these did you insulate? If I insulate none then I'll have an echo. If I insulate them all then the sound will just die. How many should I insulate and where should they go (random? corners? middle? Etc).

Bryan Pape did my sound plan, which called for floor to ceiling wall insulation on my front wall and my back wall. On my side walls it was floor-to-ceiling about 2/3 of the way in (To about the back of my front seating row) and then he called for the last area to have no insulation for the top 4' or so in the rear side area to allow for more of a surround field. As far as how thick each wall should be, well you should probably measure since your room is differenent. My room was 2" front wall, 1" side walls, 4" back wall. A lot of people have 2" side walls. And corner bass traps are very important.
post #767 of 897
After muddling through the cluttered and excessively long Acoustical Treatment thread, I gathered and did the following:

Rigid fiberglass board (1" thick Johns Manfield IS300 or OC703) applied to front wall in two layers (for a total of 2"), in fabric frames on side walls slightly above ear level and below (I think it measured 44" from the floor), same for rear wall. I will evaluate the need to possibly replace the batting and place the fiberglass in the upper portion of the rear wall after the room is done and I can run some tests. The space above the rigid fiberglass was filled with 1" of poly batting material just to fill the space and provide back pressure to the material, as it has no real acoustical deadening properties.

Behind the false screen wall, the corners were spanned across with regular 24" faced fiberglass insulation and the same for the ceiling to wall area here. (Bass traps). I didn't have much area or room for large bass traps in the rear but in a rear sofit I did install small bass traps, made from standard R13 faced insulation. They are smaller but it's better than nothing!
post #768 of 897
Whats the best way to make 2" thick frames?
Edited by cdika17 - 9/23/12 at 7:46am
post #769 of 897
With 2 inch wide wood/MDF, How deep were you planning to make the frames? A common method is to stack layers of Plywood , MDF or a combination to achieve the desired thickness.
post #770 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

With 2 inch wide wood/MDF, How deep were you planning to make the frames? A common method is to stack layers of Plywood , MDF or a combination to achieve the desired thickness.

My acoustic plan calls for 2" OC703 on side walls and 4" (2" stacked) OC703.

floorplanjuly2012.jpg

Without a table saw, I am trying to decide the best way. But if a table saw is needed then ill go get one, then I will need to find out which to get.
post #771 of 897
Here is my "table saw". I'm up to 56 panels with another 30 or so to go. I thought I would need one to rip the ply into 1 1/2" wide strips, but the circular saw and clamped guide work just fine. If you go this route, remember to stack two pieces of ply together when making your cuts so you get two strips with each cut. Big time saver.

IMG_0760.jpg
post #772 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Here is my "table saw".

+1, I went with the same approach, circular saw + $20 clamp on fence - takes longer to rip the strips, but worked fine.
post #773 of 897
So to make 2" thick frames to go with my 2" wall treatments my best choice would be to go with 4 layers of 1/2" plywood? 1 1/2" wide?
post #774 of 897
Yup that would work fine - they'd be heavy though, so keep that in mind as far as mounting approach (I used speaker ball/socket connectors, that probably wouldn't work well with frames that heavy; permanently attached with brad nails would work, but my brad nailer only shoots brads up to 2" long I think; some type of french cleat would work, or french cleat on top, ball/socket pegs/velcro on the bottom - just thinking out loud).

To reduce weight, I would think about using 1/2" solid plywood for the front and back layers, but for the middle 1", use 1.5"x1.5" squares of 1" thick material - two layers of 1/2" plywood, or maybe 1" MDF or finger jointed point or whatever other solid stock you can find - in the corners, and then say every 6-8" inches. I haven't tried it though.
post #775 of 897
If you are not beveling your frames, you may want to rip 2"+ wide ply and place it on its sides (bowed side out) and then wrap fabric around the frame.
post #776 of 897
Yah i plan to have the edges beveled. I may either do:

4 layers of 1/2" plywood stacked by 1-1/2" wide and mount with liquid nails and 2 1/2" 16 gauge finishing nails or a combo of french cleat and finishing nails.

or

To cut down on weight, go with 1/2" plywood on it's side, ripped to 2" and use a combo of speaker grill guides and french cleat to hang.

Like so:

post #777 of 897
You can just use two layers of 3/4" and then mount on 2x3s with cleats like I did. I used 3"+ of absorption. You could just put 3/4" ply on the wall as a spacer and mount the frames on that.
post #778 of 897
I will be interested to know what you choose to do cdika. I believe my wall treatments will be 2" on the sides and 6" in the back. Been wrestling with ideas and haven't come up with any good ones. Sounds like the above options may be worth a look.
post #779 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreasMergner View Post

You can just use two layers of 3/4" and then mount on 2x3s with cleats like I did. I used 3"+ of absorption. You could just put 3/4" ply on the wall as a spacer and mount the frames on that.

That actually makes more sense, shallower/lighter panels with deeper furring
post #780 of 897
Then a person can still shoot finishing nails in corners, hmm interesting.


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