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Fabric Frames - Page 29

post #841 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanice View Post

I am using industrial strength velcro to attach my panels. So far (with the two that I have up) it is holding really well. I wanted to be able to take mine down to repair them in the event that one gets damaged.

Vanice,

This seems like a KISS method to attach the panels. Why not make it easy right? Have you fired up an extremely capable sub that can actively flex your walls to see if the velcro stays quiet? This is the only potential drawback I can see. Can anyone think of a reason NOT to do it with velcro if it works?

I would think one consideration would be that you might not be able to place the velcro on top of the part of the fabric that wraps around the panel or it might tear off when you remove the panel. Any thoughts?
post #842 of 897
I just put a couple of staples into the velcro (through the cloth and into the wood frame). It's not going anywhere!
post #843 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by twells View Post

I just put a couple of staples into the velcro (through the cloth and into the wood frame). It's not going anywhere!

Now that has me thinking..........why didn't I think of that!! Good idea. Any insights on the concerns I mentioned with the velcro? Do you have a flush look? Any noises? How difficult are the panels to remove? I have seen people use a modified coat hanger to get behind a panel to remove it.
post #844 of 897
No, no issues with noise at all. It can be difficult to remove the panels though (mine are flush) if you use too much (as I did on the first few I made). I would imagine that you could use an automotive trim removal tool (think small plastic crowbar) without any concern about damaging the panel if your tolerances were really tight. I wouldn't trust myself with a coat hanger!
post #845 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

Vanice,

This seems like a KISS method to attach the panels. Why not make it easy right? Have you fired up an extremely capable sub that can actively flex your walls to see if the velcro stays quiet? This is the only potential drawback I can see. Can anyone think of a reason NOT to do it with velcro if it works?

I would think one consideration would be that you might not be able to place the velcro on top of the part of the fabric that wraps around the panel or it might tear off when you remove the panel. Any thoughts?

I haven't cranked it to 11 yet since I installed my two panels on the wall but I haven't noticed any rattles to this point with reasonable volume. I do have a fairly capable sub...



I feel like the velcro does a really nice job of cushioning the panel. I installed the above panel with (6) 2-3" strips (two each at the top, middle, and bottom). I thought I might have to throw in a few finishing nails but everything stuck really well. I have used staples to hold the velcro but in this case I just trimmed out a little of the fabric so that the velcro stuck right to the wood. As my panel sizes get bigger I will add a few more pieces of velcro to help hold them. In my case I will also have some MDF strips that will be nailed horizontally to the spacers on the wall that will actually help hold the panel up in the vertical direction.

Now removal may be a little tricky. Finding an edge to get a hold of will be the tough part but that would be the case no matter how you attached them. I'm guessing that if I ever have to remove a panel that the velcro may just pull off with the panel. Then I would just have to put some new strips on and it's good to go back in. Much cleaner and easier than if it were nailed and glued on and probably has about the same holding power as a ball and socket connection.
post #846 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by twells View Post

No, no issues with noise at all. It can be difficult to remove the panels though (mine are flush) if you use too much (as I did on the first few I made). I would imagine that you could use an automotive trim removal tool (think small plastic crowbar) without any concern about damaging the panel if your tolerances were really tight. I wouldn't trust myself with a coat hanger!

Another great idea. This looks promising and is reasonably priced from harbor freight. I am sure there are other options that are even more aptly suited. Perhaps a thinner tool so one can place it sideways into the small gap and then turn it down behind the frame just like the brave people are doing with their modified coat hangers.

http://www.harborfreight.com/5-piece-auto-trim-and-molding-tool-set-67021.html

Edit: An allen tool may be a good way to go as Spaceman noted below.
Edited by jedimastergrant - 6/5/13 at 2:12pm
post #847 of 897
I used Velcro to attach my panels to the wall also. I used pretty small pieces. Maybe only an inch or two long in the corners and along the edges as needed. It worked out really well. Installation was easy and I can easily pull them off the wall if I need to for whatever reason.
post #848 of 897
I slide a small allen wrench between my panels when I need to remove them. Insert, twist 90 degrees and pull. Works well with the ball and socket system.
post #849 of 897
Vanice,

"A fairly capable sub" may be a slight understatement!

The first few panels in your thread look good. I also like the column design with the lighting. Very nice work.

The horizontally nailed mdf strips are genius. The weight of the panel is then taken care of and all the velcro needs to do is suck it into the wall to give it a flush look.

Awesome indeed!
post #850 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by meyer64 View Post

I used Velcro to attach my panels to the wall also. I used pretty small pieces. Maybe only an inch or two long in the corners and along the edges as needed. It worked out really well. Installation was easy and I can easily pull them off the wall if I need to for whatever reason.

Good to know that less is more. I suspected so.

I love the Virtual Poster Display project you have been working on. I briefly looked into buying backlit poster frames and they are hundreds so this seems like an alternative with infinite possibilities.

I think I have a space for a small panel in between my double door system. Glad I ran conduit if I need to pull through hdmi. I may decide to use it strictly as a movie poster display and skip the rest of the functions.
post #851 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NGiovas View Post


As far as attaching to to the wall, to get a good clean fit, I think a brad/pin in each corner is the best way to go.  I put a very small spot of glue in each corner and put a pin in to hold it while the glue dried.  Removing them should be pretty easy, yet they aren't going to just fall off.

The brad and liquid Nails is how my theater wall were done. It has worked out great no rattles. I have removed three, of the very first fabric frames, to redo the fabric stretch. The frame pulled off the wall but did do a little damage to the dry wall. As mine are glued directly to the drywall. If you are gluing to furring strips it should not damage anything.

For a 2" acoustic treatment wall i think that is what I would do. First add furring strips to the wall to create a 1" gap to be filled with rigid fiberglass or poly filler. Then the Fabric Frame would attach to the furring strips (glue, brads, or velcro) and create the final 1" for a total 2" acoustic treatment.
post #852 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post

The brad and liquid Nails is how my theater wall were done. It has worked out great no rattles. I have removed three, of the very first fabric frames, to redo the fabric stretch. The frame pulled off the wall but did do a little damage to the dry wall. As mine are glued directly to the drywall. If you are gluing to furring strips it should not damage anything.

For a 2" acoustic treatment wall i think that is what I would do. First add furring strips to the wall to create a 1" gap to be filled with rigid fiberglass or poly filler. Then the Fabric Frame would attach to the furring strips (glue, brads, or velcro) and create the final 1" for a total 2" acoustic treatment.

I think I am going this way as far as the furring strips are concerned to create my necessary gap.

Using the mdf strps to support the weight looks like a great idea too.

And at this point the velcro method seems very simple and easily removed. I don't know of a reason not to use it. If someone else does then please let me know.

Important question here. Is there any type of wood I should stay away from for making both the furring strips or the panels? mdf, osb, 2x4's, 2x2's.........I have left overs of all of these materials at the moment. I would imagine you want something straight but of course we have a table saw so we can make straight cuts.

Any considerations for ease of putting the staples into the wood? Or how a material may be prone to bowing? I would think the osb if not oriented properly may not be sufficient but I don't know. I don't mind making cross bracing in order to make a material work.
post #853 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

Vanice,

"A fairly capable sub" may be a slight understatement!

The first few panels in your thread look good. I also like the column design with the lighting. Very nice work.

The horizontally nailed mdf strips are genius. The weight of the panel is then taken care of and all the velcro needs to do is suck it into the wall to give it a flush look.

Awesome indeed!

It gets the job done. biggrin.gif

Thanks for the compliments. The horizontal strips were just by coincidence. I didn't plan them to help hold the panels but it is nice when things work out like that.

I used 2x2s for my furring strips and then made my panels out of one layer of 3/4" ply. Gives me about a 2 1/4" gap to fit my 2" cotton. Works out well.
post #854 of 897
+1 on the velcro. My panels are horizontal so the weight is supported by the panel below down to the floor. Most of the panels have 2" of velcro in each corner and another 2" in the middle of each long edge. My panels are different to most in that I used a 2" deep bullnose profile to give me curved edges. The main problem with this was having to mitre cut all the corners. Most of my panels also have 1 or 2 cross members to stop the edges bowing in with the fabric tension. I also stapled the velcro to the back of the panels as someone else mentioned earlier.

So far all seems very secure with no strange "velcro" noises !

Cheers,
post #855 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by twells View Post

No, no issues with noise at all. It can be difficult to remove the panels though (mine are flush) if you use too much (as I did on the first few I made). I would imagine that you could use an automotive trim removal tool (think small plastic crowbar) without any concern about damaging the panel if your tolerances were really tight. I wouldn't trust myself with a coat hanger!

Holy cow! Your post freaked me out as our user names are so similar and a I also have fabric frames affixed using velcro.
post #856 of 897
Mine are purely friction fit and I have had no issues. Mine also rest on top of my trim work so YMMV.
post #857 of 897
What are you guys putting behind your fabric frames ?? It's sound treatments? Or just bare wall ?
post #858 of 897
Absorption (OC 703) under some panels, nothing under others
post #859 of 897
post #860 of 897
post #861 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

How did you figure out where to put it and where not to put it ?

Very simple ... **money** me --> Dennis ...... **design** Dennis --> me ! biggrin.gif

Cheers,
post #862 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by scl23enn4m3 View Post

It's a right of passage to get through this thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/255432/acoustical-treatments-master-thread

Enjoy smile.gif

I''ve been swallowing information from this forum for about a month now but avoiding that one. I think I am ready now.
Wish me luck biggrin.gif
post #863 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPowers View Post


Frames are 21" high, 30" wide and 1" thick. Just right to match the width of 65" width of the GOM fabric. You can cover two frames by cutting the fabric in half.


Frames are attached using liquid nails and 2" brads. Tried the Velcro but did not like it.


Web site has been updated. A section was added for the fabric Frames



Greg's GOM frames

Great stuff Gary!

I see height and width for the total frame and thickness but how wide did you rip each piece of wood to make the frame?

Thanks,
Jim
post #864 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyk36 View Post

Great stuff Gary!

I see height and width for the total frame and thickness but how wide did you rip each piece of wood to make the frame?

Thanks,
Jim

The 1/2 inch plywood and MDF were ripped too two inches wide. Good luck with your build.
post #865 of 897

some of the posts on this forum are suggesting there are pictures but I am not seeing many pictures. What am I missing?

post #866 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheaterPhantom View Post

some of the posts on this forum are suggesting there are pictures but I am not seeing many pictures. What am I missing?

All of the post to the original thread topic, the Fabric Frame. are all present.

If other reply photos are missing, it is properly the way that are hosted. When replying you can point to a photo (via an HTML link) that is NOT hosted by AVSForum. So if the poster is no longer hosting the photos you will not see them. If the photos was uploaded to AVSforum the photo will be there as long as AVSForums makes it available.
post #867 of 897

Gary,

That makes sense, thanks for explaining. BTW I love your work. I plan to use your technique. I am a few months away yet. Still in the framing stages right now

post #868 of 897

Before I commence to begin to start, :p, shopping for Linacoustic material. Do you guys have any suggestions as to where the best prices are?

post #869 of 897
Try local HVAC or insulation supply houses. Not sure where you are located, but see if you have a General Insulation nearby. The sell Knauf Sonic XP and Certainteed Acoustablanket Black, which are both very similar to JM Linacoustic.

If you can't find it locally, Fabricmate sells it but it will be a little pricey compared to a local find.
post #870 of 897

Thanks Spaceman, I'll check around

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