or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New movies on LD  

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
In this message thread cpc makes the comment that no NEW movies are being released on LD these days. I'm sure this is an accurate statement, but my question is: what was the LAST major title released on LD? The last LD I bought was Star Wars Episode I.....

I've heard people talk about U-571 on LD (I think), but that might have been a Japanese import. Does anyone know what NEW movies are being released on LD these days, if any? Also, would someone speculate as to whether LDs will be phased out mainly in the U.S. or worldwide? It sounds like there is still a strong LD "movement" in Japan....

Thanks for your input!

------------------
Peace....


[This message has been edited by tomdkat (edited 05-30-2001).]

[This message has been edited by tomdkat (edited 05-30-2001).]


[This message has been edited by tomdkat (edited 05-30-2001).]

[This message has been edited by tomdkat (edited 05-30-2001).]
post #2 of 31
I guess I was a little hasty with that comment. I believe I am right, but regardless, with little or no Laserdisc players available in North America, apart from combo CD/DVD/LD players and boutique LD players like the MAC 7020, its only a matter of time. It might be possible that some Laserdiscs are still being pressed though, but I doubt it. I guess someone else here will fill us in as to the status of new movies and the last Laserdisc release, if there has been one. So what are getting at anyways? Do you figure the last movie to be released on Laserdisc might be a collectable? Makes sense, especially if its a good movie.

[This message has been edited by cpc (edited 05-30-2001).]
post #3 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by cpc:
I guess I was a little hasty with that comment. I believe I am right, but regardless, with little or no Laserdisc players available in North America, apart from combo CD/DVD/LD players and boutique LD players like the MAC 7020, its only a matter of time. It might be possible that some Laserdiscs are still being pressed though, but I doubt it. I guess someone else here will fill us in as to the status of new movies and the last Laserdisc release, if there has been one. So what are getting at anyways? Do you figure the last movie to be released on Laserdisc might be a collectable? Makes sense, especially if its a good movie.


[This message has been edited by cpc (edited 05-30-2001).]
I was just wondering if anyone knew for a fact that there are NO more new movies being pressed on LD and if so, what the last movie was. I was just curious and I'm not trying to challenge you AT ALL, so please don't feel like you're under attack... http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif

It might be that no more NEW LDs will be released in North America, yet they will continue to be released in Japan or Europe (whatever)..... I'm just curious.....



------------------
Peace....
post #4 of 31
Tom:

All LD plants outside of Japan have been shut down. There is only one plant remaining in Japan, and none of the discs made there are for release outside of Japan (you have to import them). The number of new releases has dwindled to a trickle (less than a dozen in the past several months), and Pioneer has said it will cease support for the format in the near future. I'd give it maybe until the end of the year (if that long) before LD production ceases entirely.
post #5 of 31
I wasn't offended, I just wasn't 100% sure that LD's were finished with new releases. I guess you were curious about obtaining new Laserdiscs. I was kinda aware that LD's were probably out of production, so I was wondering what the last North American movie release was on Laserdisc.

Anybody know? I guess its possible more than one LD was released in one last run.
post #6 of 31
The last U.S. LD was BRINGING OUT THE DEAD last October 2000. The last Japanese movie LD that I know of was X-MEN in January 2001. A few weeks ago, a season of STAR TREK VOYAGER was released on Japanese LD. This I saw on my e-mail newsletter from CD Japan. There may be a few minor releases on Japanese LD this year, yet, but the LD thang is winding down in ze Motherland too. "...the times they are a'changing..." Best wishes!

------------------

Rachael,la gata del disco Grande, meow meow!
post #7 of 31
I could give you a small mostly complete list of what has come out in the last 8 or 9 months in Japan. Tarzan (No subtitles), The Sixth Sence, Lake Placid, The Patroit, The Seige, Scream 3, U-571, X-Men, Little Mermaid 2, Star Wars Special edition box set, Tomorrow Never Dies, The Thomas Crown affair, Vampires, Anna and the King, Fight Club, The Other Sister and Superstar? I think
The last movie has far as I know that came out was in early April, Mission Impossible 2. Another Voyager box set just came out season 5 part 2 I think. The Sixth day IS coming the 22 of June at cd japan, some people have told me that it is already out but I haven't seen it. The Limey is coming in July. But that is as far as I know.
The Nutty Professor 2 is rumored to be sumetime this year. I might have missed a few but I hope this helps.
The selections are small but the do come out...
post #8 of 31
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the great responses!

------------------
Peace....
post #9 of 31
Actually, Pioneer had plans 2 years ago to eliminate LD in Japan. (And that came directly from the lead horse's mouth.) That's what they've been implementing. DVD sales at the time were sluggish in Japan, and they felt that dropping LD would give people no choice but to get DVDs. (Similar to the situation that many consumers found themselves in the States.) There are still LDs being produced, particularly anime, Japanese TV shows, movies, etc. But unfortunately, Pioneer is the licensor of U.S theatrical films for disc.
post #10 of 31
Quote:
dropping LD would give people no choice but to get DVDs. (Similar to the situation that many consumers found themselves in the States.
The "many" proved not to be very many at all. The bulk of LD buyers needed no "forcing" to choose DVD. It was THEIR choice.

Your post implies that Pioneer did something vaguely sinister in wanting to emphasize DVD. Of course, that's not the case at all. They simply chose to emphasize a product that is far more profitable than LD ever was, and it was a perfectly reasonable business decision on their part.
post #11 of 31
Which leads us to the almost obvious question. VHS video tape has ruled supreme, Laserdisc enjoyed cult status and a reasonable size market, and now DVD is replacing not only LD, but ultimately it will displace VCR's as the movie watching device of choice for the home. What recordable media will exist to accompany the DVD player? Will it be digital SVHS? DVD ram style recording? Will macrovision be there to ruin the compatability and usefullness of any replacement for VHS VCR's? Although I guess macrovision is already there in VCR's and DVD players anyways.

What will be the video recorder of the future?
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally posted by RobertR:

The "many" proved not to be very many at all. The bulk of LD buyers needed no "forcing" to choose DVD. It was THEIR choice.

Your post implies that Pioneer did something vaguely sinister in wanting to emphasize DVD. Of course, that's not the case at all. They simply chose to emphasize a product that is far more profitable than LD ever was, and it was a perfectly reasonable business decision on their part.
post #13 of 31
[quote]Originally posted by RobertR:
[b]
The "many" proved not to be very many at all. The bulk of LD buyers needed no "forcing" to choose DVD. It was THEIR choice.

This is not true at all. There are many who only purchased at retail. When the retailers eliminated LD (doing it before DVD even came out), most people had no outlet for LD.
Contrary to popular belief, the majority of LD consumers did not scour the Internet to buy their discs. Faced with no outlet for LDs, they took what they found on the stores.

I certainly would buy an movie on LD over DVD, if allowed. I know of many others who would as well. I've even talked with some who never had an LD player before (but have one now) who would buy LDs, if they were available. (PREMIERE magazine recently indicated that Benicio Del Toro was ticked off that he couldn't get LDs any more.)

Certainly, many LD owners did indeed embrace DVD. Of course, many of them never had players that took best advantage of LD. But considering the number of people are now importing Japanese players, there is still a decent (although nowhere near DVD's) consumer base for LD product. There's just no place to buy them.
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Certainly, many LD owners did indeed embrace DVD.
"Many" is really "the vast majority" (this was clearly indicated in a poll in the LD newsletter, asking its readers which version of a film they would rather have. DVD won easily). The number of people like yourself who would rather buy LDs than DVDs is quite small, SO small that LD manufacturers had to resort to requiring a certain number of preorders before they would even make discs for the US market, lest they be stuck with excess unsold inventory (as clearly happened-for example, the market was FLOODED with Fantasia LDs that simply did not sell, making companies decide that they simply weren't going to make LDs unless they KNEW they would sell them). And they STILL had trouble selling them, even with rather tiny preorder numbers of a mere 500. That 500 figure alone should indicate how few people share your preference. LD owners COULD have rejected DVD, just as people overwhelmingly rejected DIVX (they REFUSED to be dictated to about what they would be forced to buy), but they didn't. A very large majority embraced it and considered it an improvement. That is simple market reality.


Quote:
Of course, many of them never had players that took best advantage of LD.
I'm not sure exactly what you mean by that. From everything I've read from LD advocates like yourself, the ONLY player that shows LD at its "best advantage" is the X9 (I've seen a number of posts that say "the ONLY reason you think DVD is better because you haven't seen the X9"). Nothing else ever seems to quite measure up, because they make that statement even to people who have players such as the CLD79 and 99. With a single exception, every purchaser of an X9 I've read from is a VERY strong proponent of LD.

It makes sense for that to be the case, since it stands to reason that only those with a considerable investment in the format would buy a machine that's so expensive and difficult to obtain. BTW, that single exception said the X9 failed to meet the expectations he had for it in that it didn't prove to him to be the "DVD killer" he had been told it is (although he does say it's the best LD player he's ever seen).

For you to say most people didn't buy a player of the same calibre as the X9 would be like me saying to you, "But you don't watch DVD on an ISF calibrated NEC XG135LC with the ATI Radeon player". Of COURSE most people don't spend that kind of money.

The simple technological fact, however, is that one can get pretty close to the maximum possible quality out of DVD at a quite low price (progressive players and HTPCs can be had for $600 or less). That's not the case with LD, which I would think is a strong reason why people didn't buy the top end LD players you refer to. They probably thought, why buy a $2000+ LD player when DVD gives me topnotch quality for much less?

Quote:
But considering the number of people are now importing Japanese players, there is still a decent (although nowhere near DVD's) consumer base for LD product.
What number would you consider "decent" (do you have the actual numbers)? I doubt very seriously that total sales of X9 class players number more than a few dozen in this country. It's hard to imagine anyone considering that a decent base.
post #15 of 31
Gee Robert, don't you think DVD is just a fad? Everybody will get tired of DVD soon and go back to collecting LDs, come on, be realistic.....best wishes!

------------------

Rachael,la gata del disco Grande, meow meow!
post #16 of 31
Well, I'm another who was forced into having to settle for DVD. But I think you've missed Joel's point entirely. The pre-order quantity used by Pioneer is based on RETAILERS! However, nearly all
brick-and-mortar retailers eliminated LD, making it next to impossible for consumers to buy one! Therefore, there are no retailers to order discs to offer the consumer. The only
ones left were on-line stores. And those places often did not communicate any LD release announcements clearly, if at all. (For example, I only saw ONE on-line store mention the PITCH BLACK laser; no others). The whole concept of "pre-orders" is NOT the way the casual buyer usually purchases anything...it's an alien concept to most. (Personally, I don't know of a single person that even buys in that manner...except for me. They buy either when the see it or when they know it is out.)

To even find LD announcements was almost akin to a part-time job, and most don't bother. All that makes it VERY difficult to get even a handful of orders.

Of course, when PHANTOM MENACE was announced on LD, it was trumpeted on nearly every site. That, plus the fact it wasn't on DVD, helped sales outside of Japan reach about 50,000 discs! If it weren't so expensive, it might have sold even more. Image wouldn't release it domestically because they wouldn't press 15,000 copies as Fox wanted.

Sure, they don't match DVD numbers. But it shows that there is certainly a market for LD. There's just no one to offer it. Oh yes, my retailer told me that the MI:2 LD completely sold out its press run also (although I'm sure the quantity was lower than PHANTOM MENACE).

As for LD looking its best, I was in a store when the TITANIC DVD came out. They did an A/B (for customers) using the DVD and LD on a High-Def RP monitor. EVERY SINGLE PERSON present preferred the LD image (and I don't think any of them owned a DVD or LD player). Anyway, that store wasn't using an X9. It was either a 99 or 97. (And there are other players as good as or better than the X9 that I've seen people refer to, such as the X0 and S9).

Given the choice, I'll always opt for an LD over a DVD any day. Unfortunately, I don't HAVE a choice.
post #17 of 31
I intended to split my purchases between DVD and LD, but the LD format was snuffed out....

------------------

Rachael,la gata del disco Grande, meow meow!
post #18 of 31
Quote:
I think you've missed Joel's point entirely. The pre-order quantity used by Pioneer is based on RETAILERS! However, nearly all brick-and-mortar retailers eliminated LD, making it next to impossible for consumers to buy one!
But that's precisely MY point. Retailers eliminated LD for ONE reason: They went where the MONEY is. I don't live very far from the former Ken Crane's. Years ago, I used to go in there to buy LDs. I don't think there was a store in the whole country more devoted to LDs back then than they were. Anyone who lived near them certainly had NO complaints about the availability of a great selection of LD titles (there were even a number of places near me that rented LDs).

15 months or so after their introduction, I went in there to buy my first DVDs. At that time, KC's DVD selection was only on the back wall. They STILL had a HUGE selection of LDs filling up almost the entire store. Fast forward to last year. Now the store had only a few LDs selling at FAR below their original retail cost, for the obvious reason that they COULDN'T sell at a higher price (it would hardly make sense for KC to deliberately sell stuff for much less than they could easily sell it for). Now why do you think there was such a radical change? Do you really think they said to themselves, "we COULD make a lot more money if we still sold LDs (the awareness of KC among LD buyers was unusually high both locally and nationally), but we're going to choose to make less money selling DVDs"? Do you really think the MAJORITY of their customers came into their store and said "don't sell us DVDs, we want LDs", and that KC said "we don't care what you want, we're only gonna sell you DVDs"?

No. Resellers are in business to make money. It was an EASY decision to sell a product that brings in 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 times more revenue than LD. People sell what people buy. It's as simple as that. This reminds me of an editorial cartoon from the 70s gas crisis. It showed a big car with a bumper sticker that said "buy what America builds!". A smaller car had a bumper sticker that said "build what America buys!". America wanted to buy DVDs.

Quote:
To even find LD announcements was almost akin to a part-time job, and most don't bother
You got it exactly right. Most DON'T bother. Because they're happy buying DVDs.

Quote:
PHANTOM MENACE was announced on LD, it was trumpeted on nearly every site. That, plus the fact it wasn't on DVD, helped sales outside of Japan reach about 50,000 discs!
And when it's released on DVD this fall, it'll sell 100 times that many, which is my point.

Quote:
If it weren't so expensive, it might have sold even more.
Right. Most people like the idea of getting quality for less, another reason they prefer DVD.

Quote:
there is certainly a market for LD. There's just no one to offer it
There's no one to offer it because the market for it isn't big enough.

Quote:
I was in a store when the TITANIC DVD came out. They did an A/B (for customers) using the DVD and LD on a High-Def RP monitor. EVERY SINGLE PERSON present preferred the LD image (and I don't think any of them owned a DVD or LD player
That kind of anecdote doesn't surprise me. I've seen plenty of in-store demos that don't show DVD at its best (plasma is especially awful). I remember going to an A/V show where I saw The Matrix on a hidef RP monitor. It looked AWFUL. Swimming backgrounds, etc. If that had been my only exposure to DVD, I wouldn't be impressed. That evening, I popped my copy into my DVD player, and, as usual, NONE of the artifacts I saw at the show appeared on my ISF calibrated 100" ( a MUCH larger screen than the one at the show) front projector. It was a typically beautiful progressive component anamorphic (The Titanic DVD is nonanamorphic, and not generally considered to be reference quality) picture. And I could point to many other anecdotal examples that are the opposite of yours, such as posts from guys with front projectors who compare DVD and LD not to each other, but to 35 mm film projected in THEIR OWN HOMES, and who say DVD is easily closer to film.

Quote:
Given the choice, I'll always opt for an LD over a DVD any day. Unfortunately, I don't HAVE a choice.
It's no fun when the market goes against your personal preference (I don't care for the fact that the Bruckheimer/Bay Pearl Harbor is making more money than other more intelligent films, but that's just MY preference). But that's the way it is. The point I've been making is that:

a. LDs have stopped being made and sold because DVDs made more money for people.

b. It makes more money for people because MOST prefer DVD (and they made that choice on an informed, rational basis), the experiences and preferences of a relative few notwithstanding.

Enjoy what you have.


[This message has been edited by RobertR (edited 06-02-2001).]

[This message has been edited by RobertR (edited 06-02-2001).]
post #19 of 31
Thread Starter 
Sorry to cause SOOO much comotion with my question.... http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif

I'm a BIG fan of LD and I'm a BIG fan of DVD. I think LD has and continues to serve the home theater community very well and I'm very excited about DVD in the home theater once it matures a little more.

I hope the DVD enthusiasts don't genuinely feel LD technology is totally INFERIOR to DVD technology, therefore LD "sucks". No one has said that outright, yet, but I'm getting that impression based on some posts I've read in this forum.

I would certainly hope that DVD technology would surpass VHS and LD technology in EVERY way, since DVD technology was created AFTER VHS and LD technology. Hopefully, the DVD spec creators learned from VHS and LD successes and mistakes when creating the DVD spec.

It seems like from a video perspective, DVD is a great improvement, overall and generally speaking. From an audio perspective, it sounds like they did a good, but not great job. Part of it is also MPEG compression, disc mastering and manufacturing, and DVD player design and manufacturing that contribute to the great DVD experiences we love and cherish and to the DVD pitfalls that piss us off....

I have no problem making the statement that DVD technology is better than LD technology. I will NOT make the statement that LD technology sucks, because it doesn't.

Can't we all just get along???? http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif



------------------
Peace....
post #20 of 31
After all this LD talk, I start to be a little bit nostalgic! I saw two special edition LD boxes of T2 here in Hong Kong for a good price. I couldn't get any information from sales man as he didn't speak any English. What can you guys commend on the LD version of T2, is it a good transfer? There were no information at all on the box itself, so I don't even know if it was a DPL, AC-3 or DTS box. It was a black box including at least 4 discs.



------------------
BR /// Rob
post #21 of 31
Don't want to really extend this any further, but both make valid points. Having been involved with a number of retailers at the time, I can certainly verify that LD most definitely was intentionally eliminated by the retailers and manufacturers, not the consumers. Some chains were not even allowed to reorder titles that would sell out in a single day, even if there were buyers! (When one large chain store manager was told to eliminate all LD product by a certain date, he asked "But what about our customers?" He was told point blank by the NE regional director "Tell them they're going to have to buy these.")

As for comparisons done by others, no matter what equipment they have, I've usually noted that the LD players used were not state-of-the-art X9s, XOs, or whatever. LD is more player-dependent than DVD, but this is rarely taken into account by supposed "expert" comparisons.

Anyway, it's a moot point now. Although I also would opt for an LD over a DVD if I could. (Fortunately, THE 6TH DAY laserdisc is being released as a Special Edition, whereas
the DVD was not.)
post #22 of 31
I believe it was put out before the digital surround sound formats. It was for a long time reference quality.
post #23 of 31
I would disagree with some kind of "conspiracy theory". If LD superior in any way then DVD, then there always be market for it. Look at LP - tons of them being released, there hundreds turntables, arms and cartridges on a market (with ungodly prices I may add). Yes, they are not as durable or friendly as a CD, but some people believe that LP quality is superior, and they are willing to spend the money. No, you cannot walk into Coconuts and buy them, but people have no problem buying LPs from speciality retailers or over net. So why not such luck with LD?

When I was on HE 2001 in NYC, no one even mention LD. If LD is (in any way - video OR audio) superior format, why manufactures of speakers, processors/amps and projectors did not use it as a source to demo their products, so they can really shine in comparision with competitors? Do they intentially wanted to downgrade quality of presentation? I doubt they did.

However, even with profiliration of SACD a lot of places demoed equipment with LP sources.

I have no intention to question personal taste of people who posted on this thread, and I believe that there preference for LD is more then just nostalgy. But truth is that they are in a such minority that LD does not have any chance of survival, no matter how unfair it may look.

Fantome Menace LD is not a great example - I feel that 75% of them sitting on a shelves of Star Wars merchandise collectors unopened. And if DVD was released at the same time as LD, I would doubt they will sell 20% of what they did.
post #24 of 31
Kuzia, unfortunately quality has NOTHING to do with retail availability. All that matters is marketing, publicity, hype, and hyperbole. In that respect, DVD wins on all counts.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
All that matters is marketing, publicity, hype, and hyperbole.
That's NOT all that matters. If that were true, things such as the Edsel, New Coke, and DIVX would have been roaring successes (I saw a LOT of commercials for DIVX long before I ever saw one for DVD). Instead, they were all embarrassing flops. It's simple: People have to LIKE the product being hyped. They didn't like DIVX. They DESPISED it. But they did (and do) like DVD (it's selling like crazy), and that's not based on hype, but on buying and trying it for themselves. Whether some people are comfortable with the fact or not, it was LD collectors who embraced DVD and rejected DIVX.

Would people have embraced LD if it was marketed well? I don't think it's really possible to say. I remember that the RCA CED fiasco didn't help, as well as some other things. But I do object to the implied notion that people buy things purely because they are "told" to do so by some marketing machine. The examples I gave disprove that.
post #26 of 31
<quote>
All that matters is marketing, publicity, hype, and hyperbole. In that respect, DVD wins on all counts.
</quote>
While I can partially agree with this statement, there have been very little or no marketing of DVD at all at the first 18 month, and they nevertheless hit the stride in a manner LD never did. And again, good quality products (LP, tube electronics, etc.) did survived, just reduced to an expensive "niche" status.
If LD is in any way superior product, there would be market for $10K LD players and $200 LD sets, like now for high-end SET amps and 45 rpm LPs, no matter how small group of enthusiasts is. There always will be a people who a willing to pay premium for quality, or even perception of it. I am paying $30 for XRCDs where regular one will be $10 or less.

So blaiming death of LD on marketing hype is unfair.

[This message has been edited by kuzia (edited 06-06-2001).]
post #27 of 31
OK, I now have to respond to this, kusia give me a break.
First...there IS a market for high priced players and movies why do you think WE are complaining in the first place. There are people who are willing to buy the same movie on LD that is on DVD with less features and subtitles below for twice the price. There are people wanting to buy $2500.00 players left and right. Not to mention the players on e-bay that sell for over $500 all the time. Has a dvd ever sold for more than $200? Maybe one?? There have been dozens upon dozen of LD's that have. Just a few weeks ago the Young Indiana Jones Box set went for $650.00 the Duran Duran music LD when for $500 and the World is Never Enough when for $75.00. Why do you ask, one of the reasons is because laserdisk sound kicks dvd's butt almost always. (Just look at the post besides ours about Jurrasic Park) And if you have a high end player the picture can equal and sometimes surpass dvd. Have you ever seen or heard a laserdisk, sometimes I wonder by your statements.
Next about the marketing of laserdisk and dvd. OK hype isn't the only reason of dvd success but it does lead to LD failer. I just happen to be a senior ad designer for a major company. Not only is DVD the fastest growing video product ever but it has also been one of the highest promoted ever also. Little or no marketing??? HA HA HA HA. Months before DVD was around Panasonic, Pioneer, and Sony spent millions. Don't you remeber those pullout ads in almost every major magazine around. Don't you remember the cowbows coming at you from the TV. Geeze. What little money they had in LD they pulled ALL of it out for DVD. They all told em this is going to replace LD and most people have never even heard of LD so why bother. LD never had the base as records did so just forget it. Do you ever remember a commercial for LD in the first place??? For DVD every movie that comes out, the commecial says says "also available on DVD" they never said that for LD. And I'll tell you the biggest advocate for dvd. Blockbuster. Small, easy to rent . Blockbusters are converting to dvd getting rid of vhs at and alarming rate, by Dec. of 2002 there will more dvd than vhs. plus they have to make room for Radio Shacks in almost every store. And another thing just look at beta max, then tell me the better product always wins.
Oh and just to set the record straight I do love dvd despite its flaws. Its just that I wish that it surpassed LD in everything, then I really would have no reason to buy or keep my LD's.
post #28 of 31
It's the titles on LD that make it stille worthwhile. The shadow knows, I mean, Mr. DVD knows, auh...like basicically, that'auh, Mr. DVD has been ignoring so many catalog titles. Beaucoups of films from the 20's, 30's, 40's, and beyond are MIA on DVD.

Many of them proably look about as good on LD as they're going to look, unless, very unless, somebody does a digital repair job on them. How many films will get the treatment that Criterion gave THE THIRD MAN on DVD. Not nearly enough is proably the correct answer! It's easier and cheaper to market the new films. Look at how few catalog films that Warner Brothers is releasing. MGM isn't doing that much either, more, but not that much. Between them they control all the old movies, for all practical purposes.

The old films and the eclectic variety of material available only on LD makes the format stille viable. In real estate it's location, location, location, for LD's it's titles x 3. DVD may catch up some day, but it will proably be a VHS format by then, relatively speaking.

As long as DVD underserves the titles I would want, LD playback has a place in my system. Some things will never look better on DVD, assuming the studios even bother to release the bloody films that we want. Compare an old film like ALL ABOUT EVE on LD and DVD. There is little or no difference. If somebody will make THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD look better than the Criterion LD, I will buy it! I might not have to though...

The thing that peeved me about the LD to DVD transition was the lack of transition. The mighty, robust LD catalog was toppled too fast. Overnight, literally....It's gonna be some time before DVD catches up in the title department. We talked about this last year too. DVD has come a long ways this past year. But, the catalog vacum stille has alot of fresh whoosh in it.

What's I's is't tryin' tu shay is't, I ain't against DVD, I's reckon I favours LD too. I'm right partial to both. The serious film collector or audio-vidiot, whichever term you might prefer, of course, enjoys the best of both formats, Borg pun intended. Long live LD's for the folks who enjoy them! Best wishes, cats!




------------------

Rachael,la gata del disco Grande, meow meow!
post #29 of 31
Hi all,

Something to consider (I didn't see it mentioned above, but I got kinda lost in the middle of the thread so I could have simply missed it http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif):

What about all the people who never owned an LD player, but did jump onto the DVD bandwagon?

I fall into this category. I saw LD in action about 7-8 years ago and was impressed, but not impressed enough to fork out the premium prices required. When I got involved in DVD early last year, I saw all the advantages of LD (and more) and prices that were only slightly higher than VHS.

I don't claim to be an expert, especially since I've only ever seen LD in action once or twice and never owned a player of my own. But even though I have an active interest in HT (to the point where I hope to eventually have one of my own http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif), I think my experience with DVD and LD is the same as that of many other (most?) DVD'ers out there.

And the masses are the ones that the manufacturers are going to try and serve.

I'm not here to bash LD, but this is how many casual movie lovers would look at an LD movie: A dinosaur that you may pay over $50 for and may have to get out of your seat to switch discs half-way through the movie. (The latter point might seem like a minor and stupid thing to complain about, but guys- there's people out there who complain about the 'pause' of DVD layer changes!)

And then there's people that DID love LD and DID collect LD movies for many years. Why did these people choose to watch their movies on LD? Because LD was the best format on the market. So when a superior format (DVD) came out, they were quick to jump ship and continue to watch their movies in the best format available- DVD.

Once again, I'm generalising here... maybe LD is a superior format, that's not how most DVD'ers see it.

Sorry, but I find it hard to believe that LD would be thriving today even if the manufacturers hadn't "eliminated" it.

Note: I'm not trying to upset anybody with what I've said above, but am just contributing my views to the thread. I have nothing against LD, and in the past have even considered getting a used player just for certain titles that haven't yet been released on DVD.

-Bon
post #30 of 31
Scottsle,
prices on ebay have nothing to do with quality,
those are collector's items. The most expensive
DVDs out there - $700 Pasolini's "Salo" is one of the
worst quality DVDs ever made.

My argument will be if LD sound and video are so
superior why there are no small LD producers who will
cater to all this LD afficianados? LD mastering is a simplier process then DVD, and equipment now can be purchased for pennies on a dollar, so why no one producing jazz and classical concert LDs now? Independent movie LDs? Do they afraid of the wrath of JVC?

But I agree 100% with Rachael - there is no reason to throw away your LD player or blindly replacing every LD in a collection. But it is different then statement "LD kicks DVD butt in sound quality". It may, but occurencies are few and far between, often anecdotal and usially result of a different master, not a media superiority.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
This thread is locked