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Poll: Thought provoking movies - Page 2  

post #31 of 77
I'd have to agree that the Science Fiction genre usually offers
the most pensive and challenging of films. A hearty third endorsement of Gattaca ( an undiscovered gem, IMHO)
Blade Runner - but it takes some real liberties with the original story
Forbidden Planet (forget the effects and concentrate on the real mind-bending premise)

Others

American History X (Edward Norton is a tremendous talent)
Fight Club
Magnolias
Sling Blade (but the comment about Reagan and treatment of mentally ill makes no sense to me)
post #32 of 77
Bawko:

Iwas KIDDING. Time for some of these threads to inject a little humor. You;re right, Ilsa was a revolting piece of trash. I posted it to get a few laughs, that;s all.
post #33 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Pseudonaja:

Sling Blade (but the comment about Reagan and treatment of mentally ill makes no sense to me)
</font>
You may be reading more into my comment than is there.
Many regulations that kept severely mentall ill people in hospitals and off the streets were relaxed and changed during that time, much to the dismay of many, including the so called "Hollywood Left," and others who feel more govenment intervention is better than less government intervention. Polictical viewpoints of writers and directors are often manifiested in what they write and direct. I see it in movies and televison all the time. I wouldn't say Slingblade was a politically motivated movie, but clearly the main character was written as someone who really should not have been released in the first place.



[This message has been edited by TEW (edited 04-24-2001).]
post #34 of 77
"I think Billy Bob Thorton was trying to make a statement about
the direction we've taken as a society since the Regan administration in dealing with mentally handicapped people."

As a point of information, the great mainstreaming of institutionalized people is a product of the early 60's (and to a lesser extent the late 50's) as effective psychotropic medications became widely available. This continued thhrough the 70's and 80's, and into the present.

For good or ill, this has been this nation's health policy, and while the Reagan administration has been a convenient target for those so politically inclined (sorry if I am tarring you with a brush that does not apply) there is no particular reason to attribute this policy to him.

Stepping down off soapbox.
post #35 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by andynamus:
"

As a point of information, the great mainstreaming of institutionalized people is a product of the early 60's (snip)
. . . while the Reagan administration has been a convenient target for those so politically inclined (sorry if I am tarring you with a brush that does not apply) there is no particular reason to attribute this policy to him.

Stepping down off soapbox.
</font>
You'll get no arguement from me on that. The discussion here however is not about whether or not those policies were initiated or furthered by the Reagan administration. It's just an observation as to what may have been on the writers mind when the story was conceived.
post #36 of 77
"The Last Valley" attacked organized religion so pointedly that it was not accepted into wide release.
post #37 of 77
"You'll get no argument from me on that. The discussion here however is not about whether or not those policies were initiated or furthered by the Reagan administration. It's just an observation as to what may have been on the writers mind when the story was conceived."

OK, maybe (sounded like the comment was in your 'voice', though.) I gotta admit it was fun on the soapbox. Maybe that's what Billy Bob thought as well.


[This message has been edited by andynamus (edited 04-24-2001).]
post #38 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by andynamus:


OK, maybe (sounded like the comment was in your 'voice', though.) I gotta admit it was fun on the soapbox. Maybe that's what Billy Bob thought as well.


[This message has been edited by andynamus (edited 04-24-2001).]
</font>
It's really not relevent to my point as to whether RR initiated or followed a path that was already in motion. Many liberal thinking people attribute it to him nonetheless, and believe it rightly or wrongly.

My politics are probably more conservative than yours. Figures. When you're quick to jump on a soapbox, you usually end up preaching to the choir.




[This message has been edited by TEW (edited 04-24-2001).]
post #39 of 77
What was it Lloyd-George said, something to the effect of "a man who is not a socialist at 20 has no heart, but a man who is still a socialist at 40 hasn't got a head!"

Sounds like my path to 'enlightenment.'

ps. the only Tew I know opens craniums for a living... any relation?
post #40 of 77
american history x - how true
also:
shawshank redemption
wit (the new HBO one, wow, it's intense)
braveheart
american beauty
post #41 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">This is the only kind of movie I like to watch, ones that make me sqirm. I don't watch my movies for comfort, I watch them for the pressure they deliver. It has to be REAL.</font>
I am the exact opposite of KBK in this regard.
If I want to squirm, I'll read one of the books mentioned in my signature among others.
I like movies that make me feel good to help counteract the feeling I get from the books I read.
The most thought provoking movie I have seen is without a doubt, JFK.
There are about 30 to 40 books in my library that I bought because of this movie.




------------------
Frank...
Turn off the TV and read these books those in power DON'T want you to read...
post #42 of 77
el Topo
Paths of Glory
Three Kings
Trainspotting
Vertigo
post #43 of 77
Frank,

If I order some of those books in your list, will my name be added to a government black list of dangerous people? =)
post #44 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">If I order some of those books in your list, will my name be added to a government black list of dangerous people? =)</font>
Probably.



------------------
Frank...
Turn off the TV and read these books those in power DON'T want you to read...
post #45 of 77
Did anyone think of Planet of the Apes?
The ending was certainly thought provoking. I actually saw it in the first theatrical release. I still remember smiling as it all came together in that one last scene with the Statue of Liberty. Of course, I was only 10 at the time.
post #46 of 77
Here's a few more that got me thinking...

The Bad Seed (1956, but more chilling than most modern 'horror')

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (with Richard Dreyfuss, Gary Oldman, and Tim Roth, if you like Hamlet, this one's a riot)

Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels (better provoke some thoughts or you won't be able to keep up with it)

The Usual Suspects (great story, great cast with Gabriel Byrne, Benicio Del Toro, Chazz Palminteri, Kevin Pollak, Kevin Spacey, Stephen Baldwin, and great ending....Keyser Soze!)




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STOP DVI/HDCP!
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E
post #47 of 77
PLEASANTVILLE
post #48 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by andynamus:
ps. the only Tew I know opens craniums for a living... any relation?</font>
Hey, TEW!.. You a bouncer?

Actually, and I am not grasping here, the cartoon series (all available on one tape) 'The Maxx'. Amusing and twisted as well.

There's the rub; It's not the fact that the knife slips by, it's the way it is put in.

------------------
goosystems.com

Ken Hotte
kbk@cyberfreak.dhs.org

[This message has been edited by KBK (edited 04-27-2001).]
post #49 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by KBK:
Hey, TEW!.. You a bouncer?

</font>
Naw, I stopped opening craniums when I turned 40.
My buddy Bruno will break a leg for a
big Mac and order of fries. It's a lot more humane than opening someones head, and it keeps my hands clean.
post #50 of 77
I usually work my way down to the art films and indies eventually - I just viewed the DVD of The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, & Her Lover, without really knowing what to expect. (I was out of the country when it made it's controversial and all-too-brief appearance in theaters.) It was not an easy film to finish, but the depth of emotion and darkest of dark themes really made an impression on me. Of course, I probably won't be repeating the experience very soon.

I concur the best genre for provoking thought beyond normal bounds is SciFi - but for me that has always been the real purpose of that genre. A simple space opera or alien invasion is not completely satisfying, even if well done. Two films viewed on television stand out in my early memories from the age when the only real films I was allowed to view were Disney films and Bible stories. They are The Day the Earth Stood Still and the 1953 Invaders From Mars, both of which had young boy characters aproximately my age at that time.

My modern favorites have been mentioned already in prior discussions.

Gary
post #51 of 77
Don't laugh. I found Remember the Titans to be thought provokin.

-Jym-
post #52 of 77
City Lights, Being There, Magnolia, Atlantic City.
Eric
post #53 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Frank:
Probably.
</font>
Noam can state it pretty eloquently.

As for titles, If you thought Ilsa was revolting, imagine a cartoon where you find yourself having a difficult time explaining what it was you were watching. The legend of the Overfiend certianly can cause a rukus.

------------------
goosystems.com

Ken Hotte
kbk@cyberfreak.dhs.org

[This message has been edited by KBK (edited 04-28-2001).]
post #54 of 77
yes, Pleasantville, I agree, this one is not a bad movie at all, nice I say.
post #55 of 77
Paths Of Glory, with Kirk Douglas. Has to be one of the best movies to illustrate the insanity of war
Michael

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tuckerdog
post #56 of 77
If anyone is still reading...

Check out PI. Spelled like the symbol, not the word.

A mathematician/genius/madman working out "the patterns that are in everything" begins to unravel the answer to one of the THE BIG QUESTIONS OF LIFE without quite realizing it (I can't tell you what, or I would ruin it for you).

As he gets closer, and people realize it, he gets caught up in a torrent of political and religious situations.

...and the closer he gets to solving the question...the more insane and self-destructive he becomes. Can a human handle this kind of information? Will he be allowed to solve a great mystery of the universe, or will he go insane or destroy himself first?

See the movie.

I talked about it for a week after seeing it.

(Disclaimers: It's a Sundance winner. Black and white, even.)
post #57 of 77
Of course I have Pi. It's the first DVD I bought. It mirrors my experiences in life in a small way. Although Max didn't unravel things as much as he could have, and the truth will drive you insane. It has no choice, the human mind cannot hold it.... for very long. That's the way it happens though. You spend a lifetime driving yourself so hard that there is room for nothing else, and then one day 'oh...' it hits you, you have found your way in. From that point on, it's a struggle to keep your mind together. The rushes come, one after another, unending. Everything collapses into a simple pattern of logic, leaving nothing unanswered. Everything unravels, you merely have to spend the time thinking about it. Some cannot take the pressure and collapse from it. They should hang on, they are far from the end of it; although the emotional instability of that space makes it hard to understand such.

Let me explain it to you a bit. Can I tell you? Not at all. I tried to explain a small part of it to a close friend who I have known for 16 years now. It took two years to try and get him to listen, his monkey wouldn't allow it. Over a period of 6 months I told him small bits. He was so excited by what he understood from that, he went out and told another friend (whom he had known for 20 years or so) some of that. That friend (who was someone I know as well) tried to kill himself by walking in front of buses. He ended up committing himself for a 2 month rest. So I have to be more careful, and in retrospect I knew this sort of thing could happen.


If you are lucky you recover, If not, you end up like Nietzsche, in an asylum.


BTW, the movie I mentioned, LEOLO.. I picked up the box the other day.. across the top it says: "The Cannes Film Festival's Major Discovery".

"Because I dream.... I am Not" --Leolo
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goosystems.com

Ken Hotte
kbk@cyberfreak.dhs.org

[This message has been edited by KBK (edited 04-29-2001).]
post #58 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by KBK:
the human mind cannot hold it.... for very long. </font>
Enjoyed your post, but what exactly are you guys smoking up there in the wilds of Canada?

I thought pi was a great concept for a movie, but imho it was poorly told
The abstractness of the way the story was presented made me lose interest.

I'd love to hear suggestions for other films along these lines.

Check out a short story by Issac Asmoif (forgive the spelling of his name, I can't remember it) tilted "The Last Question." It manages to explain the origin and existence of humanity, God, and just about everything in the known universe during the last few sentences of the story. It's one of those tales that unfold right at the end. It's been 20 years or more since I read it, but it always stuck in my mind. I'd love to write a movie script based on this concept. If I had a couple million lying around, I might even shoot a film.
post #59 of 77
Well, let me go back into the archives (as -- I'm pleased to see -- some previous posters have done) and name one of my all time favorites:

A Face In The Crowd

Those who only know "Andy of Mayberry" will be stunned by Andy Griffith's incredible portrayal of a southern "cracker" who becomes a media mogul in this brilliant Budd Schulberg script. The message about the deceptive nature of media and its potential for manipulation remains incredibly relevant some 40 years after this movie was made.

I'd also nominate any movie by Atom Egoyan. I'm a particular fan of "Exotica."

And add another Canadian film: Denys Arcand's "Jesus of Montreal."
post #60 of 77
Quote:
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by TEW:
Enjoyed your post, but what exactly are you guys smoking up there in the wilds of Canada?
</font>
Remember, Canada is a net exporter....(much to the chagrin of US authorities)

Washington State Border guard: "Hello, and welcome to the United States, do you have anything to decalre?"
Canadian: " Uhm, I forget... what day is it?"
Washington State Border Guard: "Can you pull over to there, please."

Everyone and his mother grows weed in their houses, on the west coast of Canada....World's most potent, even according to government testing. I wonder how they do the testing?

I haven't read that much of Isaac Asimov's work. Only about 30-35 or so.
He supposedly has MANY more works that have not been published. What he used to do, is lock himself into a room, and write the WHOLE text in ONE shot. No editing. If it was rejected by the publisher, he put it away, forever unpublished. My brother just told me that there may be as many as 400 books sitting there, unpublished.. Is this true? Who knows.

------------------
goosystems.com

Ken Hotte
kbk@cyberfreak.dhs.org
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