or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › Local HDTV Info and Reception › What is this thing called HDTV anyway?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What is this thing called HDTV anyway?  

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
O.K. what is HDTV?
It's all about picture quality isn't it.
So why isn't quality part of the definition? http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif
Or is it?
How's this for a definition:
The same as SDTV only with at least 300 percent more resolution yielding the same apparent image quality as 480P from 1/3 the viewing distance or less.
Uses either the 720P or 1080i broadcast standard.

Frank
post #2 of 13
I always thought "High Definition Television" captured the picture quality idea quite nicely.

------------------
"Better living thru modern, expensive electronics devices"
tm
post #3 of 13
Actually it would be any resolution greater than 480i

Such as
720I
720p
1080i
1080p
etc.....
I agree the term is rather vague

------------------
Studio Broadcast Engineer
KET
post #4 of 13
Woowoo,

Anything greater than 480i? No way, we're not letting Fox off that easily! I certainly don't think 480p is HDTV. I personally wouldn't consider 720i to be HDTV, but that one is perhaps subject to debate.

~1,000,000+ pixels on screen seems like a decent definition to me.

Jim

------------------
Let me get this straight, this show is hi-def and 5.1, but my local affiliate makes it crappy NTSC and mono?!
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
The pixel argument is meaningless.
The only thing that matters is image quality!
A 480P transfer upconverted to 2 zillion pixels is still 480P no matter how you slice it.
If the standard calls for the same apparent image quality from 1/3 the distance then that really means something. A upconvert would not pass that test.

Frank
post #6 of 13
hey I'm with Frank.

The RCA DTC-100 upconverts everting to 540i, but I wouldn't consider that HD.

I've heard people even argue between 720p and 1080i. I can basically agree with this arguement as it goes something like this. "If it doesn't have more than 1000 lines of original vertical resolution it isn't HD". So basically post processing means nothing.

With an HTPC I can make 480i look almost as good as 720p. But it's soft. Unlike 1080i.

It's kind of like "Quality" you know it when you see it, but try to tell someone what it is.



------------------
Tryg Hoff
post #7 of 13
Well, according to the standards that have been pretty widely accepted in the industry, its got to be 720p or 1080i to be called High Definition. Of course they are talking about the *signal*, not the content on that signal. But if its not from a master of at least that quality, I wouldn't call it high definition (with some wiggle room of course when you get anal and deal with high frequency filtering and whatnot.)


------------------
Dean Roddey
The Charmed Quark Controller
droddey@charmedquark.com
www.charmedquark.com

If it don't have a control port, don't buy it!
post #8 of 13
Frank,
What you say makes sense
But how do we measure it?


------------------
Studio Broadcast Engineer
KET
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by Tryg:
...The RCA DTC-100 upconverts everting to 540i...
FYI, the DTC100 only converts NTSC 480i to 540p - not 540i. All other HD content is up converted to 1080i (480p & 720p).

Rick



[This message has been edited by wirehead_rick (edited 07-29-2001).]
post #10 of 13
FYI, from the RCA web site re: DTC-100:

The HD Monitor output preserves the horizontal resolution of the broadcast, which for standard definition digital broadcasts may be up to 720 pixels per line and for high definition broadcasts may reach 1920 pixels per line. The vertical output of the HD Monitor output will be either 540p (progressive) or 1080i (interlaced) depending upon the input format. Specifically, both 720p and 1080i inputs are output as 1080i; all other formats are output as 540p.

And 480p isn't HDTV, either.

------------------
"Better living thru modern, expensive electronics devices"
tm
post #11 of 13
oops, my mistake. 540i 540p?

It all looks like crap on a 10' wide screen. Just give me 1080i....what's the big deal? and a processor and projector that can do 1080p http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/biggrin.gif
post #12 of 13
Frank it's this old mans dream come true, to see a movie in the aspect I seen in the movie theatres only now I have that same view at home, where the popcorn and soda are much cheaper.http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif

------------------
Hob for Hobby
post #13 of 13
Hob, I agree. Although capital expenditures are high, long term savings from cheap concession prices balance out the financial equation.

Frank, I am not 100% convinced of your initial premise. Is HDTV all about picture quality? HDTV, as a complete concept (at least as it was packaged to me) includes widescreen aspects and 5.1 sound. Of course these concepts are not unique to HDTV and maybe that is why they are not part of your (and probably a lot of other AVS Forum members') definition. Unfortunately, if we truly held HDTV to my standard, ABC might be the HDTV standard bearer and not CBS and that just doesn't seem right, does it?

Sorry JimboG, I would put widescreen 480p with high quality 5.1 sound above or at least equal to 1080i without 5.1 sound (depending on the type of program) and certainly higher if the 1080i was not widescreen (no matter what the program).

I would propose as a definition:


"The same as SDTV only with at least 300 percent more resolution, yielding the same apparent image quality as 480P from a viewing screen that is three times as large at the same viewing distance, together with a viewing screen that is 1/3 wider than traditional television sets and includes at least four more discreet channels of sound.
Uses either the 720P or 1080i broadcast standard."



[This message has been edited by Sarahlea (edited 07-31-2001).]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Local HDTV Info and Reception
This thread is locked  
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › Local HDTV Info and Reception › What is this thing called HDTV anyway?