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Add Cooling Fan to A/V Cabinet - Page 2

post #31 of 585
[quote=Grimdeath]
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpblade View Post


I went with 80mm fans because it's hard to find a whole saw bigger than 80mm. I mounted the fan inside the cabinet blowing out; nothing is visible on the outside.

Perfect, thanks for the info.
post #32 of 585
Interesting idea! I might have to add a fan to my Synergy rack. My challenge is that my rack has the extended rears, so cutting the hole will be a bit more work...

Thanks to everyone for the links to all the different fans mfrs!
post #33 of 585
Just finished my project, I should have taken pics but I didn't. Fortunately I had a holesaw that was exactly 80mm. Used the AC8 fans they are super quiet. Hooked up a rheostat into a RS project box to make it nice and neat, and plugged the 1000ma 12v adapter into the back of my receiver for switched power so I don't need to constantly turn them on and off. However I might plug them in to constant power since my PC is always in there and on.

Jeff
post #34 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by supraman215 View Post

Just finished my project, I should have taken pics but I didn't. Fortunately I had a holesaw that was exactly 80mm. Used the AC8 fans they are super quiet. Hooked up a rheostat into a RS project box to make it nice and neat, and plugged the 1000ma 12v adapter into the back of my receiver for switched power so I don't need to constantly turn them on and off. However I might plug them in to constant power since my PC is always in there and on.

Jeff

Jeff,
Glad it works! Sounds exactly what I will do. Can you summarize all the parts needed for this setup, price and where you picked up? Did you get 2 fans or 4? Read earlier they should only be used as exhaust fans near top. How did you configure your set up?

Thanks,
Paul
post #35 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by phsmits View Post

Jeff,
Glad it works! Sounds exactly what I will do. Can you summarize all the parts needed for this setup, price and where you picked up? Did you get 2 fans or 4? Read earlier they should only be used as exhaust fans near top. How did you configure your set up?

Thanks,
Paul

In my setup I went with one exhaust fan at the top of the component tower. I have a fairly large home at the base for the cabling coming in and the doors are far from air-tight so I figured fresh air will find its way in. Instead of a rheostat I cabled the fan to a variable voltage 1300mA or so AC->DC converter you can buy cheaply at Walmart or RadioShack. These converters are the universal ones that come with all the connectors you can plug into the end. They range from like 3.5v to 12v with a switch so you can set the fan to whatever fixed speed you like. RadioShack sells a mating plug with wires that I used to solder together an intermediate cable that is a 3-pin fan header to female universal power plug. This way I can swap out fans with ease if need be. You can buy a fan splitter cable and tack the universal connector on to that instead to connect two or more fans.
All said, I probably spent under $20 all said and done; fan, converter, plugs, etc. I run mine 24/7 as there is a DVR in the cabinet.

The RS adapter plug in question:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=family

For the AC->DC adapter, just search RS online for "ac-to-dc adapter" (ex. part 273-1680 is one). Walmart is much cheaper.
post #36 of 585
I used artic fans from newegg 80mm they were 17.88 shipped. The 12v 1000ma power adapter from RS was also $18. Then the misc other parts were probably $5 box, wire, rheostat. I was thinking about the variable power supply sounds like a good idea and I'm sure walmart was way cheaper for something like that then RS. But there are no walmarts near here. So it was just over $40 still a good deal. Still need a way to monitor the temp and test different fan speeds.

Jeff
post #37 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by supraman215 View Post

But there are no walmarts near here.

post #38 of 585
Well there is one but it's not on my way home from work, and it's lik 30 minutes into noman's land lol.
post #39 of 585
I set up an AV systems with plasma and components in separate cabinets. Components were rack mounted in a closed cabinet and the plasma was in a wall recess with a picture frame around it. I bought two System 1's from Active Thermal Management.
http://www.activethermal.com/System_1.htm
One worked so well I used a "Y" to split air flow to cover both systems and never used the second one, and since the unit is in the attic there is no discernable sound. My Adelphia (now Time Warner) "Moxie Box" DVR runs 24/7, and HOT, so my fan needs to run 24/7 otherwise the DVR would roast itself and the other components. This unit is relatively low cost to run continuously especially with a speed control that cut down the speed. I used inexpensive HVAC 3" aluminum stretch tubing and fittings from Home Depot to connect to the cabinets. Using a remote thermometer to monitor the units the inside of the cabinet with the volume cranked up is not that much above room temp except for right behind some of the components but the air gets sucked up and out of the top of the cabinets. The air goes into the plasma through a 1/2" by 48" slot in the bottom of the frame and then up past the plasma and out 2 holes in the ceiling to the attic. If anyone is interested in info (or a deal on my unused 2nd unit) I'd be glad to discuss it.
John
LL
post #40 of 585
Is there any easy way to connect standard case fans (with a 3 or 4 pin molex connector) to be powered by either USB or a wall outlet?

I'd rather not have to have a case power supply and I do have an available USB port from my dish box that I can use. All I"m needing to power is a single, maybe two 120mm case fans.

Thanks in advance.
post #41 of 585
At roughly $200, it is not cheap. But it plugs right into a wall outlet, has 3 92mm user selectable variable speed fans. And also has a 12v trigger input to turn it on. And the option of a 10 minute delayed off, to cool down very hot running items even after they have been turned off. And it also has a 10 year warranty on parts with a 5 year warranty on labor. But even with the $200 price, it's really not that bad for what it offers. I have seen similar products that offer a lot less, yet they also cost a lot more. Than this Parasound "Zbreeze" does.

http://www.parasound.com/zcustom/zbreeze.php

http://www.parasound.com/pdfs/ZbreezeBrochure.pdf
post #42 of 585
The 2 80mm Artic cooling fans are not quiet. Not sure why but i can definately hear them when the room is silent. Not when there is sound though.
post #43 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhaberer View Post

Is there any easy way to connect standard case fans (with a 3 or 4 pin molex connector) to be powered by either USB or a wall outlet?

I'd rather not have to have a case power supply and I do have an available USB port from my dish box that I can use. All I"m needing to power is a single, maybe two 120mm case fans.

Thanks in advance.

If you read up two or three posts you have your answer. Get a cheap AC->DC converter.
post #44 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by supraman215 View Post

The 2 80mm Artic cooling fans are not quiet. Not sure why but i can definately hear them when the room is silent. Not when there is sound though.

Turn them down to 10 volts or so; they run much quieter at that speed.
post #45 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimdeath View Post

.

The RS adapter plug in question:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=family

For the AC->DC adapter, just search RS online for "ac-to-dc adapter" (ex. part 273-1680 is one). Walmart is much cheaper.

So the adapter plug from RS has bare wires on one side to connect with the wires we cut the plug off the end of the case fans?

John
post #46 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by sorahl View Post

So the adapter plug from RS has bare wires on one side to connect with the wires we cut the plug off the end of the case fans?

John

Yes it has bare ends. You *could* cut the plug off the fan and solder it directly to the adapter plug, or you can do what I did and solder the adapter plug to a male connector that mates to the fan plug. This way you can swap out fans if necessary without cutting and resoldering.
post #47 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimdeath View Post

Yes it has bare ends. You *could* cut the plug off the fan and solder it directly to the adapter plug, or you can do what I did and solder the adapter plug to a male connector that mates to the fan plug. This way you can swap out fans if necessary without cutting and resoldering.

Grim, thanks any chance you can provide a photo of this? And just so I"m understanding you correctly. You used multiple fans to run off the one wall wart unit? I'm thinking about using three fans, one blowing in the cabinet at the bottom, and the other two at the top exhausting the air. Only one concern I have is that all this is in a 'closet'. My contractor suggesting one interesting idea. Using a type of dryer exhaust set up to take the air out of the cabinet and exhaust it right out of the closet itself.. I'm not sure but if my idea does't cool it off enuf i might try his.
post #48 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by sorahl View Post

Grim, thanks any chance you can provide a photo of this? And just so I"m understanding you correctly. You used multiple fans to run off the one wall wart unit? I'm thinking about using three fans, one blowing in the cabinet at the bottom, and the other two at the top exhausting the air. Only one concern I have is that all this is in a 'closet'. My contractor suggesting one interesting idea. Using a type of dryer exhaust set up to take the air out of the cabinet and exhaust it right out of the closet itself.. I'm not sure but if my idea does't cool it off enuf i might try his.

I'm running one at the top of my cabinet as an exhaust. There is no reason you couldn't run more than one if you have a large enough transformer. Each fan is rated for a max current draw at 12V. Make sure that the AC->DC converter can source more than all of them added together with some margin.
I'll try to post a pic tomorrow.
post #49 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by kruzmisl View Post

I set up an AV systems with plasma and components in separate cabinets. Components were rack mounted in a closed cabinet and the plasma was in a wall recess with a picture frame around it. I bought two System 1's from Active Thermal Management.
http://www.activethermal.com/System_1.htm
One worked so well I used a "Y" to split air flow to cover both systems and never used the second one, and since the unit is in the attic there is no discernable sound. My Adelphia (now Time Warner) "Moxie Box" DVR runs 24/7, and HOT, so my fan needs to run 24/7 otherwise the DVR would roast itself and the other components. This unit is relatively low cost to run continuously especially with a speed control that cut down the speed. I used inexpensive HVAC 3" aluminum stretch tubing and fittings from Home Depot to connect to the cabinets. Using a remote thermometer to monitor the units the inside of the cabinet with the volume cranked up is not that much above room temp except for right behind some of the components but the air gets sucked up and out of the top of the cabinets. The air goes into the plasma through a 1/2" by 48" slot in the bottom of the frame and then up past the plasma and out 2 holes in the ceiling to the attic. If anyone is interested in info (or a deal on my unused 2nd unit) I'd be glad to discuss it.
John

Pretty cool John. I'm in the process of doing similar, trying to vent the heat out of the room altogether instead of just the rack. I'm connecting my exhaust up to the air intake return on my HVAC system, but I think I might need something to encourage the air in the rack to leave.

I was afraid if I just vented to the attic I would end up with too much negative pressure (after running the fan 24x7) that it wouldn't push air anymore. I know bathroom vents will push all day, but they're loud. Plus in the winter time, I'd rather not throw hot air outside.

For that system 1, can you put the blower in the attic so it sucks the air out of the room through the tube? Or does the blower need to sit in the room and blow the air down the tube?
post #50 of 585
Not knowing much about electricity and not wanting to fry anything, I thought I'd be clever and got a USB-to-IDE cable which has a power adapter and supplies a molex 4-pin connector (won't let me post URL... I'm generally a lurker). Then I got a regular computer fan which has an adapter to use with that kind of connector.

Well... my luck wasn't so good. The power adapter only seems to supply 3 of the 4 pins, and the adapter for the fan needs the missing pin it seems... it just doesn't work... any ideas for me?
post #51 of 585
USB ports are 5V...1/2 amp, unmanaged.

If you have a 5V fan, it would work...otherwise, you'll need a 12V (or whatever the fan needs) supply.
post #52 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Targus View Post

USB ports are 5V...1/2 amp, unmanaged.

If you have a 5V fan, it would work...otherwise, you'll need a 12V (or whatever the fan needs) supply.

You could simply pop the 5V supply pin from its spot on the molex and move it to the 12V spot. The fan will run fine at 5V, but will be much slower; it may still be to your liking.
post #53 of 585
Sorry, must not have explained myself well enough. The URL would have shown it nicely-- the USB-to-IDE adapter had two parts, the data cord, and a power supply that plugs into the mains and supplies a 4-pin molex connector. IOW, the power is not supplied by USB, rather the included power supply.
post #54 of 585
The pins that are there are 1, 3, and 4. From looking up on the web, the 2 is a ground lead.
post #55 of 585
A 4 pin molex power connector has 2 grounds, a +5V and a +12V .

Are you saying that your fan has 3 conductors?
post #56 of 585
Because a picture is worth a thousand words... attached.
LL
post #57 of 585
Move the black wire from the fan, to the pin next to it on the molex connector. They left out one of the grounds, because it's not really necessary...both middle pins should be ground.
Just move the molex pin.
post #58 of 585
Jeff, One good way to quiet fans is to "series two DC fans to get half speed and more than half the noise of one! This also allows the distribution of the flow in a cabinet situation.

Carll
post #59 of 585
Thanks... I was able to slide the molex connector out and swap them with just the help of a tweezers, and it works great. I am also able to add more fans onto the same setup. I'd definately recommend it as an inexpensive and easy way to add fans.
post #60 of 585
This is the equipment I used:
For power: http://www.directron.com/usb2535.html
I got 2 fans: http://www.directron.com/safb82.html - these came with the 3-pin to 4-pin adapter
I also picked up a few extensions: http://www.directron.com/3pincable.html

Am not affiliated with the company... just the one that had all the parts I needed to minimize shipping costs.

For someone that doesn't know how / want to solder, yet wants to add some cooling to their entertainment center... I think this is an easy way to go.
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