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Installing Plasma over fireplace - how to wire ? - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Ok. Great. So I will just use an outlet box (with conduit opening) and wire up an outlet in there. Run conduit from the outlet inside the fake chiminey and into the crawlspace, never going to the outside. From there, I will tie in to the electrical outlet that is in the crawlspace. not that anyone would know this, but does this sound up to code?

Also, anyone that has a plasma installed, did you run a dedicated circuit? I assume no since I can't see it drawing that much power, but I wanted to ask to make sure. If so, I will pull a wire from the panel to the location the conduit enters the crawl.
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by claytonHD View Post

...
What are you guys doing about the power part of the equation? I don't feel comfortable running an extension cord down to the crawl space, yet. but the longer I wait, the more impatient I get...

Chris

chris,
personally i would never run an extension cord in hidden space. ithink it might be a code violation, but to me it's just unsafe practice in general. i am planning on tieing into an existing circuit & running to a new receptacle behind the tv. like yourself, mine is a gaslog insert type. therefore i'm trying to be cautious about running the electrical line near that gas line underneath the fireplace. i tried to sketch my intended layout as best as i could forgive my drafting skills.


hope this helps.
kahlil
LL
post #33 of 51
kahlil

I agree with the extension cord plan. My plan was to use true electrical wiring just like they use in the walls, out into the fake chimney in conduit, under the crawl where there is an outlet and tie it in there. however, in looking more, I have and outlet in a similar location to yours so I guess I could run horizontal and tie in there. I assume you will remove the sheet rock in a small section across the wall and chisel out to place the wire in the studs? Let me know how it is going for you.

In the attached image, I show how my FP is laid out. In the insert, you can see the way I would go through the studs. Remove a section of drywall, chisel out a groove in the studs, and then run the wire, cover with a metal electrical plate, and replace the drywall. BTW, the inset image of the stud is from the side, with the stud facing left to right. Forgot to put that in the image.

My skills aren't great either. But maybe some of this discussion will help someone.
LL
post #34 of 51
Sometimes it is best to use Google to find answers.

Look at Step 10

That's what i was trying to say and draw...
post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by claytonHD View Post

kahlil

I agree with the extension cord plan. My plan was to use true electrical wiring just like they use in the walls, out into the fake chimney in conduit, under the crawl where there is an outlet and tie it in there. however, in looking more, I have and outlet in a similar location to yours so I guess I could run horizontal and tie in there. I assume you will remove the sheet rock in a small section across the wall and chisel out to place the wire in the studs? Let me know how it is going for you.

In the attached image, I show how my FP is laid out. In the insert, you can see the way I would go through the studs. Remove a section of drywall, chisel out a groove in the studs, and then run the wire, cover with a metal electrical plate, and replace the drywall. BTW, the inset image of the stud is from the side, with the stud facing left to right. Forgot to put that in the image.

My skills aren't great either. But maybe some of this discussion will help someone.

kool diagram! my idea is similar except the path i am taking will have the wiring from the fireplace wall outlet drop straight down (vertically) instead of horizontally away from the wall (& towards or behind the bookcases for me). in the basement below it will then run horizontally over towards the existing receptacle & vertically up again. hope that makes sense.
post #36 of 51
I just completed my project and used 2" PVC up and over to get behind where the panel is mounted. As far as the heat, PVC is not a problem. Think about it, if it gets hot enough to melt PVC, do you really think they would allow wood studs within a foot of the firebox? The firebox does a good job of insulating the heat, that's it's job.
post #37 of 51
While it may not be proper, I am running my power through an extension cord down the PVC pipe, into the basement and plugging it into a surge protector that I ran a 110V to. I can't imagine where you have room for a surge protector and outlet behind a plasma???
post #38 of 51
If you alread have power on the wall, check this out:

http://www.monstercable.com/power/pr...Screen%20Power

A little pricey, but it's pretty small and does the job.
post #39 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by claytonHD View Post

Sometimes it is best to use Google to find answers.

Look at Step 10

That's what i was trying to say and draw...

Not a good idea to run power with out metal condo - first - it's not code in most places, second - metal condo will isolate power from interfering with your signal cables.
post #40 of 51
Just a note to people that have fireplaces with gas/fake logs - these types of fireplaces normally require an outlet to be properly mounted near them, albeit hidden. This means that at the time your home was built, an outlet was also professionally installed. I found my outlet below the fireplace. All you have to do is pull on the vented metal either below or above your fireplace to gain access.

I have a question and could not find it after much searching - sorry if it's been answered previously.

If my plasma television is mounted a few feet above my fireplace, will the heat that's generated by the fireplace affect anything with the tv? When I currently use the fireplace my tv gets extremely hot on the bottom. Additionally, I'm starting to see the dreaded 4:3 lines when I watch a 16:9 show - was wondering if the heat might be causing pixel issues.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by MajorD View Post

Just a note to people that have fireplaces with gas/fake logs - these types of fireplaces normally require an outlet to be properly mounted near them, albeit hidden. This means that at the time your home was built, an outlet was also professionally installed. I found my outlet below the fireplace. All you have to do is pull on the vented metal either below or above your fireplace to gain access.

I have a question and could not find it after much searching - sorry if it's been answered previously.

If my plasma television is mounted a few feet above my fireplace, will the heat that's generated by the fireplace affect anything with the tv? When I currently use the fireplace my tv gets extremely hot on the bottom. Additionally, I'm starting to see the dreaded 4:3 lines when I watch a 16:9 show - was wondering if the heat might be causing pixel issues.

i know its been a while since this was asked & you may have alreay discovered this, but i wanted to resurrect this thread anyway because i'm nearing completion with my install.

but majord, u might want to check out this thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...ma#post8356355
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kahlilj View Post

i know its been a while since this was asked & you may have alreay discovered this, but i wanted to resurrect this thread anyway because i'm nearing completion with my install.


Thanks kahlilj! I mounted my plasma above the fireplace (about 1 foot above) and have not had any problems. Although, I only run the fireplace for a few hours if I even use it at all; so my statement may not be applicable for folks in a colder region who use the fireplace often.
post #43 of 51
All this is getting too complicated.

Go ahead and run the horizontal conduit, since you've already tore open the walls. That's the hard part anyway. Just drill through the studs in whatever way is necessary to get the conduit in. You will not weaken them apreciably. Plumbers do it all the time for their big (2") pipe. If you are really concerned about the size of the holes, make several runs of smaller conduit, several inches apart. I've seen walls where the vertical studs have been cut all the way through, and not much was moving around.

The idea is to drill the holes as close to the center of the stud as possible. It's better, IMO, to make the wiring runs as short as possible, rather than worry about the studs being drilled. Choose the best route based on the shortest wire runs and on not getting too close to the firebox.
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kahlilj View Post

deep pockets, i am still learning about this myself. one thing i was informed of was, that the fireplace external wall does not get very hot. some electrical pvc i have seen (usually gray colored not the white for water service) is rated to 90°C which is ~194°F. the firebox does not reach that temp so i believe the pvc should provide adequate protection & no melting should occur. but i have also read that the maximum safe temp for pvc pipe is ~140°F. can someone verify this?



hope this helps & does not confuse you too much.

Hi

This thread has been very useful. I have a similiar issue.

My plasma is mounted in a cubby hole (about 2' deep) over a fireplace. Currently my wires just run in plain sight (ugly, yes) from the back of the TV to the front of the mantle and down to a equipment on a corner table placed to the left of the fireplace.

My thought based on this thread was to duplicate your idea of running wires down a conduit pipe from the rear corner (dead space wrt fireplace box) of the cubby hole down to my crawl space. But I have the same concerns wrt high temp and heat that could melt the pipes/wires.

Also is there any concern the the high temperatures could distort the video signals in HDMI or component video cables and audio in speaker wires (I need to run a speaker wire for a center channel above the plasma).

Did you find a solution for the conduit pipe that would withstand the temperatures behind the fireplace and also be good to run A/V and perhaps power wires through? What did you end up using?

Also did you have to get special A/V or electrical power wires wrt the high temp/heat behind the fireplace? I could not access the URL for electrical PVC.

Thanks
Bob
post #45 of 51
PVC, whether sch 40 or sch 80 is good to about 140 deg F. CPVC is good to about 200. PVDF good to 280 deg F. These ratings only pertain to the materials resistance to failure under water pressure (their intended use), so they'll probably withstand melting to some higher degree. These ratings also have nothing to do with insulating properties. Just because a pipe is rated to 140 deg F, does not mean that the airspace within won't get that hot. PVC is a fairly good conductor over time as evident by putting your hand on a PVC hot water pipe. It will feel warm if not hot.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirill View Post

I am ready to buy a plasma and put it on top of fireplace -
Any advice\\pictures ?

Don't shoot the messenger:
http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htf/.../t-253172.html
post #47 of 51
I've had my plasma over my wood burning fireplace for almost 2 years with no problems. The PVC will not get too hot and melt. If that was the case, would not the wood studs behind the fireplace be in danger of possibly going up? The only minor complaint that I have is that the TV is a little higher up than I care for. But, buy a tilting mount, tilt it down a little, and you get used to it.
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBobby View Post

Hi

This thread has been very useful. I have a similiar issue.

My plasma is mounted in a cubby hole (about 2' deep) over a fireplace. Currently my wires just run in plain sight (ugly, yes) from the back of the TV to the front of the mantle and down to a equipment on a corner table placed to the left of the fireplace.

My thought based on this thread was to duplicate your idea of running wires down a conduit pipe from the rear corner (dead space wrt fireplace box) of the cubby hole down to my crawl space. But I have the same concerns wrt high temp and heat that could melt the pipes/wires.

Also is there any concern the the high temperatures could distort the video signals in HDMI or component video cables and audio in speaker wires (I need to run a speaker wire for a center channel above the plasma).

Did you find a solution for the conduit pipe that would withstand the temperatures behind the fireplace and also be good to run A/V and perhaps power wires through? What did you end up using?

Also did you have to get special A/V or electrical power wires wrt the high temp/heat behind the fireplace? I could not access the URL for electrical PVC.

Thanks
Bob


bob,
the temps have not been a concern with me because we really don't use the fireplace much (it's a gas log insert). i ended up using the blue flexible conduit & it has worked perfectly. easy to pull my cables thru & flexible enough to route suitably behind the wall & down thru the flooring.

i agree with themase about heat not being a great concern in this location. using the flexible conduit ensured that my cables would not get anywhere near the firebox & be at risk for high temps.

as for hi temp wiring, i did not use any special wiring or cables. for power wire i used the standard (14/3?) power wire that is used for home construction.

kahlil
post #49 of 51
Thanks everyone. I will try this out. I have to determine answers, within the next few weeks, for other issues for the HT setup before doing the actual work.

Bob
post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirill View Post

I am ready to buy a plasma and put it on top of fireplace - but how to hide wiring ? I need to go about 4 feet up and 4 feet horizontally. I think i better run 1.5 inch condo to it - to future-proof it. I can't go straight down from Plasma into basement - because this is where firebox is. But if i go horizontally first - I will have to cut several studs and i am afraid it will weaken my wall.

Should i just run condo outside of the house ? But it may look ugly...

Any advice\\pictures ?

From the basement find the location and if it is not a load baring joist drill a whole through the joist. Then drop the wires inside your wall. Most of the time you only have 1 stud you need to go through at the bottom of the upstairs aka top of the ceiling.
post #51 of 51
This advise is too late for the OP, but I can't let this go without commenting on this for future readers. I know that a lot of people want to install a flat screen tv over the fireplace because it fits their furniture well. I have installed way too many tv's and my advise to anyone who wants to do this is to consider using the wall OPPOSITE the fireplace instead. Especially if you're building a new house. This makes for a really nice furniture setup, leaves the screen at the ideal height, and leaves the fireplace mantle open for pictures, candles, and other girly stuff ;-). Seriously, if that wall is open, it makes for a great setup.
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