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OT- No sympathy for Katrina victims?  

post #1 of 343
Thread Starter 
Surely there must be some members who suffered the rath of Katrina.
Anyway, usually somebody starts a thread here after a disaster if for no other reason to send our condolences. To our stricken members, I send mine. Godspeed to your recovery.
post #2 of 343
You won't be hearing from any members who are near New Orleans or near the Mississippi Gulf Coast. There is no power and no Internet access. I'm at a spot which is about as close to where the center of the storm passed which still has electricity (down the coast about 140 miles east of where the center of the storm passed).
The situation is actually worsening in New Orleans because the water is rising in the city.
post #3 of 343
NY Times is reporting that the mayor of New Orleans, is saying that 80% of the city is under water. And power wont be returned for 4-6 weeks! :eek:



It got really nasty when one of the levees on Lake ponchatrain broke. Now the flooding is really difficult to control. They problbly cant get to the levee to fix it. The pumping system is flooded itself, and even if it wasnt theres no power to run them!



And think the storm didnt hit NO it hit gulfport and Biloxi!


Things are gonna be nasty for a while.
post #4 of 343
I spent most of the day yesterday at work not knowing if millions of dollars in telecommunications equipment was working and isolated, without power, or under water. Ok, some would say how would this situation compare to those that are homeless or worse (dead), and I tend to agree. But, it didn't stop one ISP from calling in and trying to engage my employer in fixing the broadband problems in N.O. because someone had to get on the Internet in N.O.

I often wonder about some priorities of some people. I'd be thankful to be alive and temporarily in another state than surrounded undrinkable water (isolation), without power, and an impending infestation of mosquitoes by the end of the week while tolerating +90ºF 90% humidity weather.

Screw the Internet in these conditions. I feel bad for some of those people.
post #5 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFerret
I often wonder about some priorities of some people. I'd be thankful to be alive and temporarily in another state than surrounded undrinkable water (isolation), without power, and an impending infestation of mosquitoes by the end of the week while tolerating +90ºF 90% humidity weather.

Screw the Internet in these conditions. I feel bad for some of those people.
I hadnt thought about the heat, the bugs, and no water...... It's gonna be really tough!
post #6 of 343
Damn, you guys down south sure go through alot of tough times, hurricanes, tornados, what else is there. I think I'll stick with the winter months we get here.

Speedy recovery to all who have had misfortunes from these wonders of mother nature.
post #7 of 343
They're now even trying to figure out how to get the remaining survivors out of the city since the water is still rising. Estimates are this could be as many as a hundred thousand people.
They're already evacuating all the patients from one hospital and trying to get them into the Superdome. And they're contemplatating eventually getting all the people out of the Superdome.
The parts of the city which are now flooded or will flood will be uninhabitable for the indefinite future.
post #8 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by emdawgz1
I hadnt thought about the heat, the bugs, and no water...... It's gonna be really tough!
That's an understatement. All those people have been wading around in water that's full of sewage, toxins, and worse. They expect FAR more deaths from post-storm sicknesses than from the storm itself.
post #9 of 343
A guy on his roof waving for help while the house across the street is burning.

http://www.wwltv.com/perl/common/vid...props=livenoad
post #10 of 343
I am disabled and haven't been able to work for over 2 years. When I look at the damage from Katrina and the hardship yet to come, I realize I have it good. Nothing like real hardship and misery to make you stop feeling sorry for yourself.
May God watch over and protect them all.

Peace,
post #11 of 343
What has happened is a 200 ft wide breach opened up in one of the lakefront levees overnight and the water from Lake Ponchartrain started flooding into the city. They're right now trying to use 5000 lb sandbags to close the hole. But the water is now beginning to flood the French Quarter.
post #12 of 343
NPR is reporting that the Mayor of N.O. has declared Martial Law, National Guardsmen are patrolling the streets. 5 arrests for Looting. (Bastages) :mad:

There are now multiple breeches in the levees on Lake Ponchatrain. The flooding is continuing to grow. They are now making plans to evacuate the 10,000 people who are in the Superdome. It has no main power, no a/c, and the bathroom facilities are breaking down. :( yuck.

Its not so good.
post #13 of 343
And everything in New Orleans is only one half the story. They're now showing the first aerial video of the Mississippi Coast and it looks even worse than Homestead after Hurricane Andrew. The four story Grand Casino in Gulfport is now sitting in the middle of Hgwy 90. The whole thing!!
A twin span reinforced concrete bridge about a mile long which connected Biloxi
to everything east on the coast is now literally gone.
post #14 of 343
True, didja see the photo of the oil rig that broke its mooring in Mobile bay, and its now wedged under a suspension bridge???

Check out nytimes. com look at images and video, then look at "region".
post #15 of 343
I couldn't imagine this kind of destruction and the aftermath of dealing with a disaster in this proportion. May God Bless and watch over everyone down there.......

Cliff
post #16 of 343
One of my coworkers (the guy next door to me) is a Captain in the Louisiana Nat'l Guard. His unit just returned from Afghanistan a few months ago and they were called up Saturday for this. I can only imagine what he's seeing right now.

Those people are in a nightmare situation right now.
post #17 of 343
Here's a map which will give you some perspective on what's happening.
The main levee failure is near where you see the "17th Street Canal" on the map.
And as you can see the "CBD" (Central Business District where the Superdome is) and the French quarter are not far below that point.

http://www.nola.com/hurricane/popup/nolalevees_jpg.html

[edit] now they're saying water is coming up from underneath the city.
post #18 of 343
What I want to know is what can we do to help?? Donate money? time?? what??

Terry
post #19 of 343
The Red Cross site is slow right now but taking monetary donations:

https://www.redcross.org/

(or you can click on the banner ad to go straight to the donation form).

FEMA list of relief agencies:

http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=18473

Salvation Army:

http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/

Right now they are not taking donations of goods, but are taking money, but if they need goods later they'll post a list. You can also contact your local chapter of the Salvation Army to see if/what volunteer work is needed.
post #20 of 343
deeann

Thanks for the link. I just made a donation to the Red Cross.
post #21 of 343
post #22 of 343
You're welcome!

I'll probably be doing goods (a.k.a. "in kind") donation (non-perishable food, batteries, flashlights, portable radios in good working condition, clothing and shoes (in good shape)), can-openers, etc. when the needs list and local drop-off centers are posted. It's too early to tell yet what they will need. What we did at my old workplace for hurricane Andrew was have people bring in things on the need list, then sorted, boxed and labeled them and loaded up our cars and took it to the rail-yard (they were sending the items by train to the receiving/disbursement center).
post #23 of 343
It's all so unbelievable what we're witnessing. But the most overwhelming thing of all to me
is the realization that an entire major city full of people now have to relocate. The city will be uninhabitable for a long period of time. So that means that people, a great many whose families have lived in New Orleans for generations, can no longer live there and likely will never be able to return. They will have to relocate and begin their lives all over somewhere else. It's unprecedented in American history.
post #24 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by overclkr
May God Bless and watch over everyone down there.......
At the risk of being flamed, I'm going to point out that the time for divine intervention was pre-disaster not post-disaster. Now is the time for all of us to help using the links posted by deeann.

Dave
post #25 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertWood
It's all so unbelievable what we're witnessing. But the most overwhelming thing of all to me
is the realization that an entire major city full of people now have to relocate. The city will be uninhabitable for a long period of time. So that means that people, a great many whose families have lived in New Orleans for generations, can no longer live there and likely will never be able to return. They will have to relocate and begin their lives all over somewhere else. It's unprecedented in American history.
Yes but haven't they really been fighting the inevitable for a long long time there?

Shouldn't they have done more ... could more have been done to prepare for this kind of event?

It reminds me of my state's largest resort city, built on a skinny strip of barrier island, created by a large storm many years ago. Every passing storm tries to obliterate the barrier island. Every year they use tax dollars to dredge the sand that storms and just "regular weather" have stripped from the beaches.

Why? Because people wanted to defy nature, wanted to live in opposition to reality. Well, you can't defy reality. You can only taunt it.

One day the barrier island will be taken back.

N.O. has become exactly what nature made it, a big flooded saucer.
post #26 of 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcuraCL
Yes but haven't they really been fighting the inevitable for a long long time there?

Shouldn't they have done more ... could more have been done to prepare for this kind of event?

It reminds me of my state's largest resort city, built on a skinny strip of barrier island, created by a large storm many years ago. Every passing storm tries to obliterate the barrier island. Every year they use tax dollars to dredge the sand that storms and just "regular weather" have stripped from the beaches.

Why? Because people wanted to defy nature, wanted to live in opposition to reality. Well, you can't defy reality. You can only taunt it.

One day the barrier island will be taken back.

N.O. has become exactly what nature made it, a big flooded saucer.
Well one of two things is occuring. Either one, we're in a 20 year period of cyclical increased hurricane activity, or two, global warming has raised the temperature of the tropical oceans.

Either way the result is the same. If it's happening due to the natural cycle, the fact is this is the first time for that when virtually the entire coastline of the Southeastern U.S. is developed out and vulnerable. So even if it's only for 20 years, this frequency of year in and year out intense hurricanes is not tolerable. And if it's a permanent climactic change, then it obviously is no longer tolerable.
So there is no choice. They're either going to have to stop living on the coast, or they're going to have to live in hurricane proof structures. There really is no other option.

New Orleans is a unique situation though. Who knows what transpires for New Orleans now.
post #27 of 343
ACL, I don't know, the way I see it is you live where you live, I guess. No matter where you are there can be some kind of disaster (blizzards, earthquakes, tornados, floods, etc.).
post #28 of 343
What's happening now with the hurricane situation is different from the California earthquake situation, deeann. The analogy would be valid if you started having the equivalent of the Northridge quake ever two or three years.
post #29 of 343
Eathquakes are just one example, but I've lived all over the country. I know you guys have been getting hit pretty hard recently, but I can also understand it's difficult to leave your home.
post #30 of 343
It's a natural cycle, just like so called global warming
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/30/na...gewanted=print




Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertWood
Well one of two things is occuring. Either one, we're in a 20 year period of cyclical increased hurricane activity, or two, global warming has raised the temperature of the tropical oceans.

Either way the result is the same. If it's happening due to the natural cycle, the fact is this is the first time for that when virtually the entire coastline of the Southeastern U.S. is developed out and vulnerable. So even if it's only for 20 years, this frequency of year in and year out intense hurricanes is not tolerable. And if it's a permanent climactic change, then it obviously is no longer tolerable.
So there is no choice. They're either going to have to stop living on the coast, or they're going to have to live in hurricane proof structures. Their really is no other option.

New Orleans is a unique situation though. Who knows what transpires for New Orleans now.
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