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Calibration FAQ ( under development) - Page 2

post #31 of 57
I wish that was the case. I've read many posts and articles on grayscale calibration. I'm still not sure how all the color settings interact with eachother.

I really don't know where to start. I don't know if I need to change Bias, Drive, Phase, or Gain to bring the green down.
post #32 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by markrubin View Post

this thread is for FAQ contributions only: will periodically split out any other threads

please post questions in another thread

split out threads were moved Here

Thanks

sfxtreme: please start a separate thread with your questions. This thread is not really intended for individual questions to be addressed.
post #33 of 57
My appologies.
post #34 of 57
Hi,
I've just discovered this forum & would like to know more on calibrating my LCD HDTV - but the link given for Chris Wiggle's guide is no longer valid!

Does anyone have a working link for this?
post #35 of 57
the link is still valid, at least the one in my signature is.

You can also try: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...89#post4969789

It is also stickied in the DVD player forum.
post #36 of 57
Thanks for this! Very informative
post #37 of 57
Great Info!
post #38 of 57
NEW FAQ ADDITION:

I've seen others respond many times, and I have too to people asking for settings for a particular display.

Calibration is system specific. You must align your specific components in your specific system using test patterns generated in that environment. Settings specific for one system to not apply to another.

There are some general settings which may be applicable that are less system specific, for instance display options or source options. These may include things like black level setup, SVM settings (usually you want that off), user color temperature options (usually warm is closest to D65), etc.

But other than this, CALIBRATION IS SYSTEM SPECIFIC.
post #39 of 57
Im sorry if this has been asked or explained elsewhere, but I read all the links in this post about upscaling issues and colors and my brain felt like exploding. With the newer DVD players/upscalers, I have the Sony $120 version they sale at Costco, is there still issues with color and TVs switching over to "HD Color" since the DVD is sending an HD signal to the TV and the DVD only being in SD color? I have calibrated my TV with Avia and the picture appears to be great with no red/blue/green push apparent but I am no pro at this by any means.
post #40 of 57
This may be obvious, but I just realized that calibrating a monitor can fix grayscale and gamma problems, but cannot fix incorrect primary colors!

Calibrating a monitor essentially ensures that the brightness of each RGB channel matches the desired gamma (2.5 or 2.2 typically), and calibrating the balance between the RGB channels sets the whitepoint of the monitor (D65 or 6500K typically).
This only ensures that grayscale is reproduced accurately, and that brightness does not affect the hue of a color.

However, it does _not_ guarantee that colors are reproduced accurately!
For that, the monitor's RGB primaries must be close to those of the encoding colorspace (Rec 709 or NTSC primaries typically).
If they are not, then you cannot get accurate colors from the monitor!

The only way one can obtain accurate colors from a monitor with poor RGB primaries is to remap the RGB values of the data.
As far as I know, no monitor allows the user to do this; only color-managed computer software (e.g. Photoshop) does this.

So I guess my point is, make sure your monitor's primaries are accurate!
Or, if you're working with images on a computer, make sure your software is color-managed!
[alas, no Windows web browsers are color-managed, and many non-pro image software are unmanaged]
post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianchan1970 View Post

This may be obvious, but I just realized that calibrating a monitor can fix grayscale and gamma problems, but cannot fix incorrect primary colors!

Calibrating a monitor essentially ensures that the brightness of each RGB channel matches the desired gamma (2.5 or 2.2 typically), and calibrating the balance between the RGB channels sets the whitepoint of the monitor (D65 or 6500K typically).
This only ensures that grayscale is reproduced accurately, and that brightness does not affect the hue of a color.

However, it does _not_ guarantee that colors are reproduced accurately!
For that, the monitor's RGB primaries must be close to those of the encoding colorspace (Rec 709 or NTSC primaries typically).
If they are not, then you cannot get accurate colors from the monitor!

The only way one can obtain accurate colors from a monitor with poor RGB primaries is to remap the RGB values of the data.
As far as I know, no monitor allows the user to do this; only color-managed computer software (e.g. Photoshop) does this.

So I guess my point is, make sure your monitor's primaries are accurate!
Or, if you're working with images on a computer, make sure your software is color-managed!
[alas, no Windows web browsers are color-managed, and many non-pro image software are unmanaged]


This is correct, although it is worth pointing out that you can't correct for primary chromaticity problems if your primaries define a gamut smaller than the standard. You can if it's larger, but that's not the case with a lot of displays. So you simply physically cannot display colors that exceed the gamut of the display.

Some displays now that have larger gamuts have color management systems which are very cool which allow you to mimic a smaller gamut by blending in a little bit of the other primaries to bring in that coordinate to whatever value you need, allowing you to achieve accurate color. This is really pretty neat and effective, but again, only possible on displays that physically have a gamut greater than the gamut that you want to use.
post #42 of 57
It would be harder, I suppose, to perceptually map a larger gamut into a smaller gamut, but Photoshop and other applications do it.
Admittedly, it takes a second or so per image (for a 7MP image), so this kind of color correction may not find its way into limited-gamut displays anytime soon. :/

But the positive effect of remapping colors for still images, especially when viewed on laptop screens, is significant.
post #43 of 57
Thanks for all the info!

You might want to warn people to stock up on roll-aids though before reading, as that is a lot of info to digest
post #44 of 57
Good FAQ thanks
post #45 of 57
Chris, I see this thread was started quite a while ago, don't know if you are still monitoring for questions or not...

I recently had my plasma ISF calibrated, and now that I'm thinking about it, something doesn't quite tie. He used a disc, of course played in my DVD player, to produce test images. But that is introducing the DVD player in the chain. And of course when I'm watching digital cable, for example, the player is not involved. So how can the plasma be properly calibrated in this manner? I would believe test patterns internal to the plasma would need to be generated.
post #46 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie 1.8 View Post

I would believe test patterns internal to the plasma would need to be generated.

I'm new to this, but from everything I've read, don't ISF people tend to measure using external devices?
post #47 of 57
I get an invalid thread when I click on the link?
post #48 of 57
Which link?

If it's dead, it's usually archived, put either archive.avsforum or archive2.avsforum in the front of the link it should work.

For instance the split-out link is dead, it would be:
http://archive2.avsforum.com/avs-vb/....php?p=6391358
post #49 of 57
Hi.. new to forum and not highly technical. Looking for advice on how important it is to calibrate your TV. I just bought a Samsung LN T3242H and the sales guy tried his best to sell me the calibration service for $250. This seemed outrageous to me, but want to hear from this group on the issue. Can this possibly be worth it? He insisted it was not something I could do myself. He also said I need to watch the tv for 100 hours before they will come out and do it.

This is all new to me, so appreciate any advice you may have!

Kesava108
post #50 of 57
Hi, sorry just realized you don't want individual questions here. Can you recommend a thread for my post?

thanks!

Kesava108
post #51 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by kesava108 View Post

Hi.. new to forum and not highly technical. Looking for advice on how important it is to calibrate your TV. I just bought a Samsung LN T3242H and the sales guy tried his best to sell me the calibration service for $250. This seemed outrageous to me, but want to hear from this group on the issue. Can this possibly be worth it? He insisted it was not something I could do myself. He also said I need to watch the tv for 100 hours before they will come out and do it.

This is all new to me, so appreciate any advice you may have!

Kesava108

You could do your own calibration with just a Avia or DVE disk. That would cost you maybe $20 and would certainly give you a better picture than the default settings.

For another $200-$500 you could buy a colorimeter (like Spyder) and make your picture MUCH better than just the Avia or DVE disk. Depending on your TV you might have to get into the service menu to set RGB cuts and gains. The advantage of this approach is that you can calibrate all of your TVs as often as you like.

For $250-$400 you can get a professional calibration and it could be MUCH better than the previous colorimeter step depending on how much you were able to tweak with the colorimeter and how good the calibrator is.

I hope that helps. I encourage you to take one of these steps. Don't leave the TV at the default. If you really want to go cheap, you can rent the Avia or DVE disk. I know Netflix has a copy - not sure about the other folks.
post #52 of 57
Thanks HappyFunBoater! I appreciate the advice.
post #53 of 57
2 questions that might make it into the FAQ. Would be great to have more information about calibrating projectors. Question: should you point the sensor towards the screen or towards the projector? Question: in the second post it is argued to keep contrast low. Why then does Eye-One Match software tell you to put contrast at maximum... and then turns it down only slightly... is it because if you are using .icc profiles they want the most to work with before creating their re-calibration profile in the .icc file for your HTPC?
post #54 of 57
Hi, getting my Sammy LED DLP next week and was gonna order the DVE disk to calibrate and test it. HOWEVER, there appears to be 3 DVE disks available:

DVE HD Home Basics (BluRay)
DVE HD Home Basics HD Dvd
DVE HD Home Basics

I only have an SD dvd player right now and its an older one, Panny A310. My Samsung HL-61A750 is the bomb though and I want to set it correctly.

I don't have a Blu Ray player yet, just the A310 dvd player, Wii and older PS2 player.

Which DVE disk to buy???
Thanks
post #55 of 57
If you only have an SD player, get the SD version. However the SD version of DVE sucks for navigation. I suggest you also get a copy of Avia.
post #56 of 57
wouldn't a spyder work?
post #57 of 57
Folks,

I was told to move these questions here.

I was wondering... Is there but one completely correct RGB calibration for an individual panel, or are there many? In other words (using my Pioneer 5020 plasma as an example), could I get my RGB levels to 100% each with more than one combination of RGB settings, say R 457, G 480, B 505 and R 488, G 496, B 552?

If both COULD have all three levels at 100%, would they both yield the same color temp (I think they would)? Would there be a difference in the picture, theoretically?

I know there are many other factors involved, but I'm just trying to understand the impact of the RGB levels in doing a DIY calibration.

Thanks,

poormxdad
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