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The Official Stewart Film Screen thread. - Page 9

post #241 of 1855
Hi all,
Anyone have the email for the Miami dealers of Stewart screens?
Thanks!
Ruben

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #242 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctviggen View Post

Thanks. Yes, we will have blackout curtains (and likely will watch at night), so there should be very little or no light behind the screen. What I am worried about is light that gets around the screen and reflects off the non-blackout portion of the blackout curtains (which will be a light color to placate the spouse; the walls of the room will be dark, though). Unfortunately, that's the room I have and must use. When I was looking at houses to buy, I tried to buy one with an unfinished basement. Sadly, those houses were way out of my price range.

So that probably means that unless I choose my projector and screen size carefully, I might not be able to use the Greyhawk.

Firehawk has better ambient light rejection, so if there is some possible light spill from around the curtains, I'd say go for that.

(I'm not familiar via experience with microperf screen tradeoffs, so I'll refrain from trying to answer that part of your question in more depth. I might consider a microperf in my future, if I was convined it was sonically invisible, since I'd prefer to use a single Magnepan MMG for a center speaker instead of their good but less well-blending MMG-C speaker. But that's a different topic.)
post #243 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by rds View Post

Hi all,
Anyone have the email for the Miami dealers of Stewart screens?
Thanks!
Ruben

AV Science (this forum) is a retailer for Stewart Screens. Support your "local" AVS.
post #244 of 1855
I just put up my new 82" Luxus Deluxe FireHawk. It went up nice and easy and it gives a fantastic picture, however it has some wrinkles on the bottom right edge (above the Stewart logo). It's not a huge deal, however they are visible at times when displaying lighter images. Is this sort of thing common with Stewart fixed frames?

thanks
post #245 of 1855
Hello Everyone,

I would really appreciate some help. I recently picked up a Sharp XVZ12000 and am very confused about the best screen for this projector. In speaking with local retailers, I am getting conflicting information about screen options.

So you are aware, I will be using it in a dedicated space in my basement, which will give me the ability to control the lighting. I will be seated about 14 feet and am also curious about the most appropriate screen size for this viewing distance.

Thanks in advance for any and all advice!
post #246 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by subversive View Post

...it has some wrinkles on the bottom right edge (above the Stewart logo). It's not a huge deal, however they are visible at times when displaying lighter images. Is this sort of thing common with Stewart fixed frames?

If the tension doesn't flatten out the wrinkles, you may want to consider returning it to your dealer. Sounds like there may have been a problem with how it was packed or installed.
post #247 of 1855
Can anyone comment on the spectral response of the StudioTek 130 when used with a UHP bulb projector? I have a Pearl on order. It looks like the StudioTek is somewhat minus green where I'd expect the UHP bulb to have a green peak; I think the way I read that is that the StudioTek's gain for green is somewhat less. The net should be less tweaking in order to acheive a correct grayscale.

Given a very dark / pitch black room, will a 90" wide 16x9 be too large for this projector (assuming short throw, d65 calibrated)? My back of the envelope calculates give me a range of about 12 to 24 ft./lamberts depending on bulb life.
post #248 of 1855
12-24 ftL sounds ideal for a very dark room.
post #249 of 1855
Here's my math if someone wantso to check it or my assumptions:

* 600 lumens for post d65 calibration for the Pearl (I'm going to be at about the shortest throw possible)
* 90 inches x 51" = ~32 sq/ft.
* 600 lumens / 32 sq/ft = 18.75 ft lamberts
* 18.75 x 1.3 g for the screen = 24 ft. lamberts (decreasing to about .5 over bulb life)

Is my math good?
post #250 of 1855
You get a passing grade in arithmetic.
post #251 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by millerwill View Post

You get a passing grade in arithmetic.

Yay me! :=) Thanks Bill.

If I can make the geometry work, I'll go for a 90", if not, 85".
post #252 of 1855
Any thoughts on my above post? I have the money set aside and am planning to purchase something in the next few weeks. I am torn between the Firehawk, Greyhawk and the Studiotek 130. All three have been recommended to me but I am still not sure which one would be best for my projector and environment.

Thanks.
post #253 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV Man View Post

Any thoughts on my above post? I have the money set aside and am planning to purchase something in the next few weeks. I am torn between the Firehawk, Greyhawk and the Studiotek 130. All three have been recommended to me but I am still not sure which one would be best for my projector and environment.

Thanks.

I strongly recommend viewing each and seeing what you think. If a local dealer doesn't have them set up in their shop, shame on them. However, Stewart will send you nice large samples to play with, if you contact them via their web site. (I call them "large" because what I received was 4 times the size of what DaLite sent me.)
post #254 of 1855
At a 14 foot viewing distance, in terms of field of view, you can use a pretty large screen, up to a 123" diagonal. I'm not familiar with what the Sharp puts out in lumens when calibrated properly, but I think we could assume at least 550. So at unity gain, 1.0, you would have at least 12.5 foot Lamberts on a 123" diagonal, which is workable if your theater space is very dark, including walls, floor, ceiling etc. If you go to Grayhawk, you would achieve a lower black floor, but you would need to reduce the screen size to something like a 100" diagonal to retain punch.

The Firehawk is chosen by many of our customers, since the gain is higher, and you get some latitude with ambient light control and cross reflection from decor elements. The fabric black level, when the projector is in the dark state, is very impressive. If the projector can be mounted at at least 1.5:1 screen widths away, then the Firehawk is a great choice. It can hot-spot if you mount it closer. We have a new formulation of Firehawk with a 1.1 gain and wider viewing cone, which is aimed at short throw installs and situations where viewers wish to sit really close to 1080p displays.

The Studiotek is a great choice provided your environment is very well damped for cross reflection. The weakness of this fabric is that if light does bounce around off the rear wall, or sidewalls, ceiling etc., contrast ratio goes down quickly. That said, if you do achieve a very dark theater space, the Studiotek is going to give you the most accurate white-field and color space. The Grayhawk also calibrates out really well, but requires roughly 35% more light to attain equivalent brightness, achieved either through projector selection, or a reduction in screen size. Both fabrics have exemplary off-axis viewing cones, but not excessive, so as to create even more cross reflection stimulus.

Viewing the fabrics as an entire screen is the best way to evaluate which one meets your needs most satisfactorily. I would say that we do sell more Firehawk as a rule, with single chip DLP projectors, but the other fabrics also have devoted followings amongst our dealers.
post #255 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by m Robinson View Post

We have a new formulation of Firehawk with a 1.1 gain and wider viewing cone, which is aimed at short throw installs and situations where viewers wish to sit really close to 1080p displays.

Mark, this is VERY interesting! (Is this the new screen rumored to be specially designed with the Pearl pj in mind?) Question: does it still require (for best results) a ceiling mount, or can it be mounted near the screen center (vertically)? I guess I'm asking if it is still primarily 'angular reflective'.
post #256 of 1855
The idea that an angular reflective screen must be used with a ceiling mounted projector, is nominally true but exaggerated a bit. The new Firehawk is formulated to widen the viewing cone, which further assists in mounting flexibility.

The angular reflective screen types generally do reflect light in an angle complementary to the incident angle but there is also quite a bit of diffusion, generally spreading light as well. We're not talking about an array of mirrors. We're talking about a diffusor with some angular elements in it, which pull away some of the energy that would have gone way off axis, and re-directs that energy toward the previously mentioned complementary angle.

Throw distance influences the behavior of angular reflective or retro-reflective fabrics. The shorter the throw, the more care toward vertical placement must be excercised. As the projector becomes more distant from the screen surface, the standard deviation of all incident angles of light reaching the screen, tightens up. This collimating effect, improves center-to-edge, brightness uniformity.

Projector designers have identified a single lens option per platform as a significant avenue to thier ability to offer high performance at desirable price points. As has been noted here and elsewhere, the lenses do not offer uniform light transmission at every throw option. So we made a sucessful effort to produce a contrast enhanced product, which would provide fewer artifacts when used at shorter throw distances.

I still prefer high mounted projectors when there is an offset, for our range of fabrics generally. But I wouldn't say a lower mount wouldn't suceed, particularly if the throw distance was over 1.6:1.
post #257 of 1855
Thanks Nathan and Mark, I really appreciate the responses. Mark, thanks for such detail, I found your response very educational and informative. Nathan, great idea on the samples. I will be ordering some shortly, thanks.

Mark, If you don't mind, I was hoping you might be able to answer a few additional questions.

I measured my mounting location and based on my measurements the front of the lens will be about 15 feet from the screen, which seems to put me well past the 1.5:1 ratio you mention above for either screen size. As a result, I believe the regular Firehawk (1.25 gain) would be an option without running the risk of hot spotting.

I have seen the Firehawk (I believe the 1.25 gain model) in some local retailers; however, I notice that it appears to have a bit of reflectivity or sparkle in the light areas of the image. Maybe I am being over critical as I know the Firehawk is extremely popular and well regarded but I do find it a bit distracting. Does this sound accurate or could it be something else going on at the retailer?

If the above is accurate, would I encounter a similar experience with the Greyhawk or Studiotek 130? Unfortunately, I haven't found either on display in my local market (West of Philadelphia). I mention this because I am most interested in the best possible picture and was hoping you could recommend one of the three screens as the "best" for my circumstances. To help with your recommendation, I have provided the specs for the projector below. I hope the specs help but if you need me to provide additional information, please let me know.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.
Regards, Chris

HDTV Compatible 1080i (in Advanced Intelligent Compression), 720p, 480i/p
Aspect Ratio 4:3/16:9
Resolution 1280 x 720
Brightness 900 ANSI Lumens (in High Brightness Mode)
Contrast Ratio 5500:1 (in High Contrast Mode)
Component Inputs Component/RGB x 2 (5 RCA), Video x 1 (RCA), S-Video x 1, DV-I/HDCP (Component and Digital/Analog RGB, Wired Remote Control x 1 (3.5mm Mini Jack), RS-232C Serial Port x 1 (9-Pin D-Sub), DC 12V Output x 1
Anamorphic DVD Capable Yes
3D Y/C Digital Comb Filter Yes
Optical Lens Shift Yes, 1 Full Screen Height
Film Mode Yes, 24 Hz Progressive Format
Computer RGB Input Signals SXGA, XGA, SVGA, Mac 21"/19" (in Advanced Intelligent Compression), SVGA, VGA, VESA, Mac 16"/13"
Video System NTSC/NTSC4.43/PAL/PAL(60Hz)/PAL-M/PAL-N/SECAM
Lens Type 1:1.35x Zoom Lens
Projection Lamp Type/Life 270W SHP/2000 Hours
RGB Input Type DVI-I/HDCP Connector
Component Input Type RCA Connector
S-Video Type 4-Pin Mini DIN Connector
Composite Video Type RCA Connector
Wired Remote Control Type 3.5 mm Minijack
RS-232C Serial Port 9-Pin D-Sub Connector
Gamma Correction Yes
Color Temperature Adjustment Yes
Detachable AC Cord Yes
Optional Ceiling Bracket AN-CM250
Wireless Remote Control Yes
Optional Digital Decoder Required Yes (for HDTV)
Power Source 100-240V AC, 50/60Hz (Multi-Voltage)
Power Consumption 365W (0.1W in Standby)
Dimensions
(w x h x d) 18 11/16" x 7" x 15 49/50" (475 x 178 x 406mm) (main body only)
18 11/16" x 7" x 19 1/2" (475 x 178 x 496mm) (including terminal cover)
Weight 20.7 lbs. (9.4 kg)
post #258 of 1855
Hi Mark,

As others have said thanks so much for doing this. I was all set to go and buy the Sony XBR2 next month when Sony introduced the Pearl (supposedly even brighter than the Ruby) for a price that I can't say no to. Anyway my room is completely light controlled, and is painted a fairly dark gray (that really sucks up the lighting). It's about 13' across and 23' wide (with a wider alcove in back). My initial guess was that I was going to use either the 110" or 100" screen and was going to mount the projector about 15' back. For movies, I'd keep the room black, but for sports and TV I would probably leave some lighting on (dimmed side wall sconces). I was thinking Greyhawk, but after reading a bit it sounds like the Studiotek might be more the ticket. Thoughts?

Thanks,

Dave
post #259 of 1855
Are there any specifics of the new G3 version of the Firehawk (that is reported to have a different undercoating to make it finer grained for 1080p pj's)? Is its gain the same as the G2?
post #260 of 1855
A.V. man, the sparkle phenomenon should not be a problem at all with Studiotek, should be low probability with Grayhawk, and a bit higher probability with Firehawk. The Firehawk SST is formulated with lower gain and a different ratio of active elements in the optical coating, to reduce the sparke phenomenon. This allows viewers to sit closer without seeing the screen surface.

Sparkling can become evident in white content, when small screens are hit with higher output projectors, lighting in the 40 footlambert range. When the surface is illuminated between 10 and 25 foot lamberts, it's not common to get sparklie complaints, and we get very few generally. Sparkly stuff can be seen in any gain screen if you get right up next to the surface. Which people do when they go to showrooms and are holding up samples etcetera. In the world of actual viewing we had some sparkly problems which we addressed for the majority, when we revised fabrics two years ago February with the G-2 range.

Badger,
If you want to use the Studiotek fabric, you will wash out your hard earned contrast, pretty much instantly when the incidental light comes on. The Grayhawk is slightly better equipped to function in the presence of ambient light. Firehawk is the product we offer which can actually pull that off, but you pay for it with reduced off axis performance and reduced uniformity of white field. So go with the Studiotek, but leave the lighting off. You will get re-reflected light in the venue anyway, which may or may not be enough for you in the sports viewing function. But for ambient light viewing, the Firehawk is more suitable.

My family room theatre is pretty much the same size you cited in your post. I'm using a 106" diagonal 16:9 screen. I didn't want to go wider, cause I wanted to leave some room for the speakers, so that they wouldn't be shoe horned into the corners of the room, and they could function away from boudary reflections a bit, which is really beneficial acoustically.

Thanks for considering Stewart Filmscreen!
post #261 of 1855
I had the browser open a long time and didn't realize you'd posted, after I saw the thread,

Anyway. The G-3 is not a substrate revision, it is an optical coating revision. We've developed the ability to apply a smoother grained surface optical coating, while preserving and slightly increasing the viewing cone.

The SST is a further revision of the optical coating, same substrate, but a different balance of pigmentation to widen the cone, reduce the net size further of the angular reflective elements, so that the coating is not visible until you are close enough to see the pixel grid on a 1080p projector. In doing so, the gain is reduced a bit. The gain is 1.1 and you need to have the horsepower to light it. I would venture to say that it looks best at 100" and smaller with the outputs of the 1080p projectors I've tested with it, which include some favorites here.
post #262 of 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by m Robinson View Post

I had the browser open a long time and didn't realize you'd posted, after I saw the thread,

Anyway. The G-3 is not a substrate revision, it is an optical coating revision. We've developed the ability to apply a smoother grained surface optical coating, while preserving and slightly increasing the viewing cone.

The SST is a further revision of the optical coating, same substrate, but a different balance of pigmentation to widen the cone, reduce the net size further of the angular reflective elements, so that the coating is not visible until you are close enough to see the pixel grid on a 1080p projector. In doing so, the gain is reduced a bit. The gain is 1.1 and you need to have the horsepower to light it. I would venture to say that it looks best at 100" and smaller with the outputs of the 1080p projectors I've tested with it, which include some favorites here.

Mark, thanks much for all the helpful info you've provided! Is the gain of the G3 still 1.25, or has it changed?
post #263 of 1855
Is the FH SST available in electric Model A available now or for ordering? How long would it typically take to build? (or is it a stock item?)

Thanks.
post #264 of 1855
m Robinson, can you help me please???

I have a 8 foot wide Stewart Curved screen.

Will using a StudioTek 1.3 be a problem for me?? IOW will it tend to wash out itself since it is curved slightly ???
post #265 of 1855
The gain, on axis, for Firehawk G3 is indeed 1.25 nominally. We are shipping either product, an electrically operated screen in the size of your choice has a factory lead time of 9 working days or less. A snap mounted, unmasked would be about 5 working days. Masking equipped, fixed frame orders have long leadtimes, 6-8 weeks depending on feature set. These lead times will get a bit longer pretty quickly, we booked a lot of work this week.

Cain, if we supplied the frame, and the nominal radius is 30 feet or greater, the screen should not cross reflect on to itself. What will happen however is that the curve will help a little bit with ANSI or in room contrast ratio, since the curve attenuates a bit of room exciting, relfected light, by directing it a bit away from the walls.
The Studiotek is an almost Lambertian flat field screen, but the amount of angular reflective, non-specular gain is just enough to avoid straight diffusion all the way out to over 80 degrees, unlike our Snomatte 1.0 and other Lambertian behaving fabrics. Your screen is a great size, what are you using it for, would you complete your question? From what I read here, you need at least 600 calibrated real world lumens to optimize for that screen size, a bit less if your room is well treated for cross reflection. That leaves the field pretty well stocked for your decision.

Over the years we've found very little real world utility in off axis performance that exceeds 60 degrees or even 40 degrees per side, provided the screen is not specular from poorly engineered false gain.

The one exception where extreme off axis peformance would be needed is for rear projection screens with edge matched or edgeblended images.

We have special low gain gray fabrics for front projection edge blending and we use the Snomatte in some applications of that type.
post #266 of 1855
Thank you for the reply and information. Don got me this curved screen and the material i have is not your normal stuff. My first projector a HT300HD Sim2 was really dim. I'm probably going to get that new JVC projector 1st Qtr 2007, and I'll be loking for new screen material at that time. I saw it at CEDIA and it looked amazing on a StudioTek 1.30 screen.

I have attached photos of my HT, and my screen. My ceiling is very dark grey and my walls are also medium dark grey.

Here is the info ion my screen:

Screen:

Stewart Filmscreen
Curved Screen (Custom designed)
Platinum Screen Material; 2.5 Gain MicroPerf
(MicroPerf results in a 10.2% loss of actual gain)
The screen is 100" wide and 56 1/4" tall, and is curved 4".

Here is my HT:

http://www.cainslair.com/cainht.htm

Thanks for any help here.

-- Cain
post #267 of 1855
I'm on the verge of purchasing a Sony Pearl projector (the VPL-VW50) and a firehawk screen - I will likely take delivery in late November (when I finish my basement). I just found out that Stewart is coming out with the SST -- which apparently is specifically made for the Sony Pearl.

Should I be telling my retailer to expressly order the SST? What makes it unique to the Pearl?

Also, I'm in the process of finishing a basement media room with the following measurements 20'x14'x9.' There will be no windows in the room. Thoughts on what color I should paint the walls? And how far back from the screen should the projector be mounted on the ceiling?
post #268 of 1855
Anyone in AZ want to buy my Stewart Electriscreen?
post #269 of 1855
i am really Concerned about the Sparkle issue ... as i went to a store in my city that demonstrated the Grayhawk with a 720p Projection Design FRONT projector ... i have noticed Sparkling Tiny Spots (stars) in the screen in the same position more often which was extremly annoying !!!!!! ... i wonder if that case is Common with the Firehawk G3 .. that i am planning to get with the Optoma hd81 1080p Projector for a 21 ft through distance on a 123" 16:9 format screen ..... as the light output is 1400 Lumins .... what do u guys suggest ....since it's gonna be a dedicated HT .. as Contrast and blk levels are Mandatory for a movie performance ! ... while i can have a slight dimm lighting in the space ...
thanx
post #270 of 1855
There's a 120" electric stewart screen on ebay if anyone wants it. hint hint.
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