or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › ISF Calibrators, where are you located? Please post here!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

ISF Calibrators, where are you located? Please post here! - Page 97

post #2881 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cla55clown View Post

I second that question. Durham area for me. 55" Sony LED.
I could get that done tomorrow afternoon. smile.gif
post #2882 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLaughingFish View Post

Are any calibrators going to be in the Raleigh-Durham area soon? I just purchased a Pansonic VT60 and I would like to get it calibrated sooner than later. I saw a post last month indicating that D-Nice covers this area.
I'm right in SC. PM sent.
post #2883 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cla55clown View Post

I second that question. Durham area for me. 55" Sony LED.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cla55clown View Post

I second that question. Durham area for me. 55" Sony LED.
I can get it done tomorrow or later in the week. I'll PM you.
post #2884 of 3100
I am going to be in Portland OR. I arrive on Sept. 18 and come back on the 24th. Would be happy to do some calibration and/or repair work on your display while I am there. If you are in Salem, Vancouver, Beaverton, Hillsboro, Lake Oswego, Milwaukie etc, contact me and let's get together while I am there.

b
post #2885 of 3100
I'm also in the Raleigh area. D-Nice (or anyone else for that matter) if you'd like to send a PM that would be great. I have a Samsung 64F8500 that now has about 200 hours of use on it.
post #2886 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by supermandlb View Post


Hey Chad, I live in Northern VA (by Dulles Int Airport) Do you ever make it out that way? Thanks!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post

Yes, about every other month.smile.gif If you'd like to schedule, please fill out the contact form on my website. Thanks!

I just had Chad B calibrate my Panisonic ST60 yesterday and all I can say is...WOW!! It truly looks amazing! If anyone is looking for someone to calibrate their TV, I highly recommend Chad B. http://hdtvbychadb.com/

He took his time, was very detail oriented and explained the whole process to me step by step. The results are simply stunning!! A+++

Thanks again Chad!!!
post #2887 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattduke1 View Post

I'm also in the Raleigh area. D-Nice (or anyone else for that matter) if you'd like to send a PM that would be great. I have a Samsung 64F8500 that now has about 200 hours of use on it.
PM sent.
post #2888 of 3100
Looking for TV calibration for my 65 VT60. Im from Sacramento, CA.

PM with info and price please.
post #2889 of 3100
Yesterday Jeff Meier calibrate my Sharp Elite and Pioneer receiver with Definitive Technology speakers.I watched few movies on blu ray and I must say WOW.Picture quality is beautiful,colors are vivid blacks are inky,contrast is in the spot and audio is amazing,now is loud, crisp and balanced,dialog is more clear.Everything is way better than was before.He did a great job with my
equipment.
Thank you Jeff
Daniel
post #2890 of 3100
hi dont want to go threw 96 pages i need isf cal in south miami that speakes english zip 33190? ty all in advance. 65zt60
post #2891 of 3100
Just a quick note - I am in Portland OR for my brother's wedding and will have a day or 2 afterwards if somebody here would like a calibration or optics cleaning for their projector system. This can be front projection or self-contained rear projection like DLP.

Eventually any projection system will need optics cleaning, tho CRT needs it the worst and soonest. If it's been more than a year since you've had yours cleaned, it needs it again. If it's been more than 3 years it's already starting to look really bleary, due to the static cling caused by the 30,000 volts it uses to operate. The difference after one afternoon's work is stunning, especially when your CRT has not been cleaned in more than 5 years.

I calibrate and clean all projection types, new or old, and specialize in calibrating and cleaning older rear projection CRT RPTVs and bringing them back to better than new performance. CRT has none of the niggly little things that plague much of the newer all digital technology. If you own one and are questioning whether to keep it or buy new, please see my AVS thread Don't Dump Your CRT RPTV!, about to reach its 400th complete page.

Especially the very first post, done in 2006. Unless you are ready to spring for the best in buying new and have money to burn, not an awful lot has changed since then. I encourage you to keep your set and have its performance maximized, so it can perform like it was always designed to. See my YouTube videos for more info.

wink.gif

Mr Bob
Edited by Mr Bob - 9/19/13 at 7:25am
post #2892 of 3100
Any calibrators going to be in the Philly area in the next few weeks? I have the Panasonic P55VT50. Please PM me. Thanks.
post #2893 of 3100
Hi Bob,

Yes I need to get down there for a client in the near future. I sent you a PM. Let me know. Thanks!
post #2894 of 3100
Anyone available in Buffalo to calibrate a Panny 54V10?
post #2895 of 3100
I would like to get some information on calibrating a Pansonic 65VT30 that is in Lumberton, TX. Please PM me.
post #2896 of 3100
Thanks! Mr Bob.
post #2897 of 3100

  Within the next week I will be having my Panasonic GT50 replaced with a VT60 and I'm having trouble finding any calibrators within the state of Alaska. So far my only real option it would seem is to buy equipment and learn myself or have Best Buy do it (which I would rather not have to do). So I'm wondering, do you guys happen to know anyone in Alaska who can do a professional calibration?.
 
 I feel as though I will be getting a VT60 and never truly seeing it's potential if i cannot find a pro calibrator.

 Any help is appreciated, Thank you.

post #2898 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by 59Hertz View Post

  Within the next week I will be having my Panasonic GT50 replaced with a VT60 and I'm having trouble finding any calibrators within the state of Alaska. So far my only real option it would seem is to buy equipment and learn myself or have Best Buy do it (which I would rather not have to do). So I'm wondering, do you guys happen to know anyone in Alaska who can do a professional calibration?.

 

 I feel as though I will be getting a VT60 and never truly seeing it's potential if i cannot find a pro calibrator.
 Any help is appreciated, Thank you.
If you can find a few more enthusiasts wanting calibrations in your general vicinity I might be able to do a tour... I've always wanted to visit Alaska.
post #2899 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post


If you can find a few more enthusiasts wanting calibrations in your general vicinity I might be able to do a tour... I've always wanted to visit Alaska.



 I wish I could say I could do that. But I highly doubt I would be able to find enough people within a decent time frame. This is going to eat me alive now.

post #2900 of 3100

 Could you please enlighten me a little on how a calibration process works? Does the calibration itself just perfect the televisions already available settings or are the tools you would be using giving you access to even more options not listed.  If D nice or you list the settings you use. How far off would that be in general picture quality than if you where to come in and do it personally.  This is probably a silly question but I'm still new to this.

 I understand it changes depending on location of TV, daytime or nighttime viewing ect. But I guess I'm not understanding exactly to what extent that is.

post #2901 of 3100
Welcome! 59Hertz.
post #2902 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by JA Fant View Post

Welcome! 59Hertz.

 
Thank you!

post #2903 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by 59Hertz View Post

 Could you please enlighten me a little on how a calibration process works? Does the calibration itself just perfect the televisions already available settings or are the tools you would be using giving you access to even more options not listed.  If D nice or you list the settings you use. How far off would that be in general picture quality than if you where to come in and do it personally.  This is probably a silly question but I'm still new to this.


 I understand it changes depending on location of TV, daytime or nighttime viewing ect. But I guess I'm not understanding exactly to what extent that is.

Sure! The process starts by scheduling a time for me to come by, and the process takes about 4 hours on a VT60. I open up 2 new 2D picture modes called Professional 1 and Professional 2. These modes are just added to the list of picture modes you have now like THX Cinema, Standard, Vivid, etc. Professional 1 will be your day mode, and light output and gamma will be optimized for viewing with light in the room. Professional 2 will be your night mode, and light output and gamma will be slightly different and optimized for darker room viewing. These modes can be locked, so if someone tries to mess with your set they won't wipe out the calibration. I will also calibrate Professional 1 for 3D if you are into 3D.

I will set up 2 meters, a reference spectro and a profiled colorimeter, which will be hooked up to my laptop. I will hook up a pattern generator which will provide the proper test patterns to the TV. I will set up a network connection between my laptop and your VT60 and use software to control the TV's settings.

I'll start by laying the groundwork for the calibration: setting things like brightness, contrast, panel brightness, AGC, etc.

The foundation of the picture is the White Balance (AKA grayscale). That is the ratio of red, green, and blue that make up the whites and grays at different brightness levels. I use software that will measure that ratio and tell me if there is too much or too little R, G, or B at a particular brightness level. I will adjust the 2 point White Balance adjustments first, which give an RGB adjustment for bright and dark ends. Then I'll move on to the much finer 10 point controls. I will take 10-20 passes to get it as good as it can be.

The software will also report to me if the relative intensity is too high or too low at a given given level, which is called gamma. I will adjust the 10 point gamma control so that mid tones are reproduced at the proper intensities.

After the grayscale and gamma are optimized, I'll move on to the CMS adjustment. There is a hue, saturation, and level control for each primary and secondary color. Taking red for example: hue can make it more or less orange or purple. Saturation will make it more pure like a fire engine red or more pale like pink. Level will add more or less red in the overall mix when the picture is drawn up. That adjustment is done for R, G, B, C, M, and Y. Red has a tremendous effect on the quality of skin tones. I'll measure each color at different intensity levels and saturation levels from pale to pure and make sure the overall accuracy is as good as it can be.

Then I'll go back and re-tweak the 10 point grayscale/gamma adjustment.

After the day mode is done, I'll do the same process for night mode and 3D mode if desired. You'll get PDF files showing the before and after measurements and backup settings files.

I will put a test disc into your Blu Ray player, check some patterns, and make sure it is set up correctly.

The calibration does not access new controls. It's making sure the controls the TV has are optimized to the fullest. Think of it this way: it's not turning the knob; it's knowing which knob to turn.

D-Nice lists his settings for some models, but not all. I don't. I have had VT60 and VT50 owners who used published settings and even followed the break in "rules" religiously, and surprise, surprise... Their sets were no better or even worse than if they would have just put them in THX Cinema and not messed with anything.

I don't publish settings for many reasons:
  • Calibration varies from one sample to the next. If I have 2 VT60s side by side, calibrate the first one, and then put it's settings into the 2nd one, the 2nd one is most likely not going to be good enough to be called calibrated. I've done it before and tried it on an LG LED and several others; it just doesn't work.
  • Calibration takes into account your specific environment (lighting conditions,etc), system (source settings, etc) and even your wishes (do you like a darker picture or brighter, etc).
  • If I were to publish settings and you were to put them in, when your set and other variables don't match up, you may mistakenly think "Hey, I don't like this. I must not like a calibrated picture!" That gives calibration an undeserved bad reputation.
  • I do this for a living and work hard at calibrating each TV from scratch.
post #2904 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad B View Post


Sure! The process starts by scheduling a time for me to come by, and the process takes about 4 hours on a VT60. I open up 2 new 2D picture modes called Professional 1 and Professional 2. These modes are just added to the list of picture modes you have now like THX Cinema, Standard, Vivid, etc. Professional 1 will be your day mode, and light output and gamma will be optimized for viewing with light in the room. Professional 2 will be your night mode, and light output and gamma will be slightly different and optimized for darker room viewing. These modes can be locked, so if someone tries to mess with your set they won't wipe out the calibration. I will also calibrate Professional 1 for 3D if you are into 3D.

I will set up 2 meters, a reference spectro and a profiled colorimeter, which will be hooked up to my laptop. I will hook up a pattern generator which will provide the proper test patterns to the TV. I will set up a network connection between my laptop and your VT60 and use software to control the TV's settings.

I'll start by laying the groundwork for the calibration: setting things like brightness, contrast, panel brightness, AGC, etc.

The foundation of the picture is the White Balance (AKA grayscale). That is the ratio of red, green, and blue that make up the whites and grays at different brightness levels. I use software that will measure that ratio and tell me if there is too much or too little R, G, or B at a particular brightness level. I will adjust the 2 point White Balance adjustments first, which give an RGB adjustment for bright and dark ends. Then I'll move on to the much finer 10 point controls. I will take 10-20 passes to get it as good as it can be.

The software will also report to me if the relative intensity is too high or too low at a given given level, which is called gamma. I will adjust the 10 point gamma control so that mid tones are reproduced at the proper intensities.

After the grayscale and gamma are optimized, I'll move on to the CMS adjustment. There is a hue, saturation, and level control for each primary and secondary color. Taking red for example: hue can make it more or less orange or purple. Saturation will make it more pure like a fire engine red or more pale like pink. Level will add more or less red in the overall mix when the picture is drawn up. That adjustment is done for R, G, B, C, M, and Y. Red has a tremendous effect on the quality of skin tones. I'll measure each color at different intensity levels and saturation levels from pale to pure and make sure the overall accuracy is as good as it can be.

Then I'll go back and re-tweak the 10 point grayscale/gamma adjustment.

After the day mode is done, I'll do the same process for night mode and 3D mode if desired. You'll get PDF files showing the before and after measurements and backup settings files.

I will put a test disc into your Blu Ray player, check some patterns, and make sure it is set up correctly.

The calibration does not access new controls. It's making sure the controls the TV has are optimized to the fullest. Think of it this way: it's not turning the knob; it's knowing which knob to turn.

D-Nice lists his settings for some models, but not all. I don't. I have had VT60 and VT50 owners who used published settings and even followed the break in "rules" religiously, and surprise, surprise... Their sets were no better or even worse than if they would have just put them in THX Cinema and not messed with anything.

I don't publish settings for many reasons:
  • Calibration varies from one sample to the next. If I have 2 VT60s side by side, calibrate the first one, and then put it's settings into the 2nd one, the 2nd one is most likely not going to be good enough to be called calibrated. I've done it before and tried it on an LG LED and several others; it just doesn't work.
  •  
  • Calibration takes into account your specific environment (lighting conditions,etc), system (source settings, etc) and even your wishes (do you like a darker picture or brighter, etc).
  •  
  • If I were to publish settings and you were to put them in, when your set and other variables don't match up, you may mistakenly think "Hey, I don't like this. I must not like a calibrated picture!" That gives calibration an undeserved bad reputation.
  •  
  • I do this for a living and work hard at calibrating each TV from scratch.

 

Thank you very much for the detailed response. That definitely helped me understand. For someone in my position who may not be able to get it professionally calibrated would you have a recommendation as to what I can do? I have the WOW disc but my eyes are not keen enough to really say what it should be or shouldn't be.

 Thank you again for your help.

post #2905 of 3100
Would like ISF calibration near Kansas City, KS. Please PM me your info! Thanks, Jon
post #2906 of 3100
I have a Panasonic 65VT60 looking for a calibrator in Santa Cruz Ca area
post #2907 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by 59Hertz View Post

Thank you very much for the detailed response. That definitely helped me understand. For someone in my position who may not be able to get it professionally calibrated would you have a recommendation as to what I can do? I have the WOW disc but my eyes are not keen enough to really say what it should be or shouldn't be.


 Thank you again for your help.
Home Theater mode and THX Cinema mode are the best looking modes before calibration.

I have had many customers use the WOW disc and end up with unnecessarily low contrast and light output. I haven't used it myself.

THX Cinema is the most accurate measuring mode before calibration. Your best bet would be to use THX Cinema and download the free AVS 709 disc to help you check basic settings.

If you want to go a step beyond that and get into DIY calibration, an i1D3 meter with CalMAN or ChromaPure is relatively inexpensive. Some training (maybe Michael's videos) would be a good idea.
post #2908 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by normh View Post

I have a Panasonic 65VT60 looking for a calibrator in Santa Cruz Ca area

Robert Busch (Busch Home Theater) and Scott (Beeswing Audio and Video).

There's also D-Nice and Jeff Meier, both do tours in that area.

For their contact info, see the Calibrator List


.
Edited by turbe - 9/29/13 at 8:52am
post #2909 of 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by normh View Post

I have a Panasonic 65VT60 looking for a calibrator in Santa Cruz Ca area

Seth Schnaible used to live in that area, tho that was years ago. I live in the SF Bay Area and would be glad to come down for you.

b
post #2910 of 3100
I'm looking for a Calibration for my 55st60 in the South Jersey Area. PM Me if anyone is available. Thanks
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Display Calibration
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › ISF Calibrators, where are you located? Please post here!