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Please Join and post what speakers you have - Page 102

post #3031 of 3360
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post

We knew what we were getting them for, and what and how they are going to be used. The system does not go any higher than -18, since again we got it for our reasons, not anyone elses.
I said ok. Why are you getting all butthurt? I was making a suggestion, a good one at that, no reason to get all pissy. I never once said that you *had* to, just that it was a good idea to based on the setup that you have. Sheesh.
post #3032 of 3360
djperfecttrip, you are the one getting butthurt, not me. Again, worry about something else, not why I or someone states that they have made a decision that they have. Especially when it comes to speakers or a/v gear. Its my money, and if I wanted to spend more on something, I would, so please find something or someone else to worry about.

As for our setup, like I stated before, it works for us, and as stated before, we did not want bottom end bass, because we did not get it for that reason.
post #3033 of 3360
*sigh* Since when is giving friendly advice 'worrying about someone'? Not everyone on this forum is an expert, so I was merely extending something that I have learned to someone else. If it works for you, great, enjoy it. I have klipsch as well and they are awesome speakers.
post #3034 of 3360
Quote:
Originally Posted by djPerfectTrip View Post

*sigh* Since when is giving friendly advice 'worrying about someone'? Not everyone on this forum is an expert, so I was merely extending something that I have learned to someone else. If it works for you, great, enjoy it. I have klipsch as well and they are awesome speakers.

It was a good suggestion though.

I personally, like you, can't imagine surround without a sub. Heck, I can't even imagine a passive sub anymore. I realize now what i missed with my HTIB's of the past. But hey, if some folks don't need lows, they don't need lows.
post #3035 of 3360
Altec Valencias
Tannoy 295A (Eaton Cabinets)
Klipsch 5.5 Black Vinyls
Advent 25th Anniversaries
Design Acoustics PS-CV
Bose Acoustimass Sub system
post #3036 of 3360
Sansui XL-300 - From searching the internet, these seem to be rare. My dad bought them when we lived on Guam ~1986-1987, and now I use them. smile.gif

post #3037 of 3360
Not quite a full HT setup yet, but the start of something beautiful (in my eyes)! tongue.gif

Rec: Marantz SR-5005

Front L & R: B&W 685 on matching stands

60% gaming and movies

40% music
post #3038 of 3360
😍



Sent from my iPhone
post #3039 of 3360
Just upgraded to 5 NHT Superzero 2.0s and a Def Tech SC8000.
post #3040 of 3360
Quote:
Originally Posted by ejusted View Post

😍



Sent from my iPhone

Well, it's nice you sent this from your iphone, but what did you send?
post #3041 of 3360
Audio System:
Shanling CD3000-tube cd player
Outlaw R2150 Stereo Receiver
Vandersteen 3A Speakers
KimberKable 8TC cable

Home Theater:
Onkyo 870?
Polk In Wall speakers (upgrading to Triad In Wall Silver)
Sony xbr 52
PS3
HSU subwoofer
Liberty UltraCap In Wall speaker cable
post #3042 of 3360
post #3043 of 3360
I'm sure I've had a couple posts in this thread over the past 10 years biggrin.gif The latest is my completely custom designed and built setup. Build threads in my sig



speakers were only pulled in like that for the pic in case anyone was wondering smile.gif
post #3044 of 3360
Hi Guys. I am a newbie here from South Africa. Just thought i would put my system out there and hear what you guys think.

55% Music / 45% Movies (it never used to be like that till i got the B&W system. was 80% Movies / 20% Music)

Main Area:

- B&W CM9s
- B&W CM Center
- B&W CM1s
- Marantz SR5006
- Marantz UD5005
- Rotel RB1080
- Samsung PS51D550
- Play!on HD Mini

Study: Using the Front B from the SR5006

- B&W 683s

(Photo quality sucks, Sorry)

IMG-20120819-WA0003.jpg

IMG-20120819-WA0004.jpg

IMG-20120816-WA0009.jpg

IMG-20120816-WA0007.jpg
post #3045 of 3360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank007301 View Post

Hi Guys. I am a newbie here from South Africa. Just thought i would put my system out there and hear what you guys think.

Welcome, nice.

A friendly suggestion; acoustically, the interaction of your mains and the surfaces immediately surrounding them can really be detrimental to smearing detail, and blurring imaging. I would experiment with some very simple re-positioning, and I'd be relatively confident it would do wonders.

Bring the L&R inward toward the center and away from the sidewalls. This will be a significant improvement, yielding a smoother FR, heightened detail and improved imaging and soundstage. Now, the next re-position is more hit or miss, however it's free and may be quite worthwhile. Experiment with varying distances between the back of the speaker and the front wall. This placement distance is critical for bass/mid-bass impact and smoothness. Proper bass detail and delineation is elusive, and this is impacted by a few factors, ... one of which being the acoustic relationship between the front wall and the speaker distance. Dips and suck-outs of response can result from this interaction, just as a nice smoothing and increase in detail.

Here is a well written representation of what I'm referring to. The effect in acoustic terms is SBIR, or speaker boundary interference response.

The acoustical interference between your speaker's front radiation, and the reflection from the wall behind a speaker. In the bottom octaves, the wavelengths are so big the reflected energy is still essentially in phase with the direct, forward radiation. But the problem arises as the frequency goes up into the mid-bass and the reflection off the front wall begins to be more and more out of phase due to the extra path it has to travel compared to the main forward radiation of your speakers. The frequency dips occur when the reflected energy begins to be in opposite phase relative to the direct energy. Typically, one can see huge swings in response, as much as 10-20dB deep.

So, you either place them right up against the wall (this is why studio monitors are flush mounted), or far enough away to put the dip below the passband of the speaker. Ideally, they tend to image better away from the boundary, so that's typically where I'd start. But perhaps you may find the placement up against the front wall to be best (or necessary aesthetically). When you place the speaker close to the wall, this raises the frequency of the interaction higher, and up into the range whereby the front energy is more directional so the interference is lessened due to less rearward energy to begin with. At lower freqs, the waves are so big that the radiation becomes almost omni-directional, and much of this occurs within the critical range of imaging and detail. this is why loudspeakers need space around them in general, so that output isn't reflected back and smeared, ...even to the sides etc. This is why cabinetry etc, is so, so detrimental.

All this is based on quarter wavelength cancellation. This is when a speaker is a quarter wavelength away from the boundary, the returning wave becomes one half a wavelength out of phase which is total cancellation. So subs can benefit from being within a quarter wave from their adjacent boundaries, and mains can benefit from being at least a quarter wavelength away from the boundaries. All this is based off the lowest frequency within their operating range for mains, and the highest freq in the operating range for subs.


Wave Length in Feet = 1130 / Frequency

So, 80hz is the ideal example since it's often essentially the subs highest freq, and a mains lowest freq.

1130/80 = 14.125, or about 14 feet long (that's the full sine wave)



So, thinking acoustic interference off an adjacent boundary, we consider quarter wavelengths.

A quarter wave for 80hz is approx 3.5 feet. So placing a sub within that distance from the adjacent surfaces will help in not having the cancellations associated with 1/4 wave boundary interference.

Likewise, placing a LCR loudspeaker, at least a 1/4 wave or greater (of the lowest freq within it's passband) away from the adjacent boundaries, or 3.5 feet or more away, places the dip below 80hz, and below the operating range of the speaker.


Below is a graphic representation of this;




Additionally, another tip is to attempt to not place both the sidewall, and the front wall behind the mains, at the same distance from the speakers. If you stagger these distances somewhat, it further smoothes these types of interactions. Also, if you place acoustic absorption directly behind your mains, directly to the side of your mains, this also reduces the amount of out of phase energy that re-enters the picture, ... thus, reducing the dip even further.



Best of luck
post #3046 of 3360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay1 View Post

I'm sure I've had a couple posts in this thread over the past 10 years biggrin.gif The latest is my completely custom designed and built setup. Build threads in my sig



speakers were only pulled in like that for the pic in case anyone was wondering smile.gif

WOW!!!...

That is all.

cheers
Edited by jproy13 - 8/31/12 at 1:37pm
post #3047 of 3360
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOH View Post

Welcome, nice.
A friendly suggestion; acoustically, the interaction of your mains and the surfaces immediately surrounding them can really be detrimental to smearing detail, and blurring imaging. I would experiment with some very simple re-positioning, and I'd be relatively confident it would do wonders.
Bring the L&R inward toward the center and away from the sidewalls. This will be a significant improvement, yielding a smoother FR, heightened detail and improved imaging and soundstage. Now, the next re-position is more hit or miss, however it's free and may be quite worthwhile. Experiment with varying distances between the back of the speaker and the front wall. This placement distance is critical for bass/mid-bass impact and smoothness. Proper bass detail and delineation is elusive, and this is impacted by a few factors, ... one of which being the acoustic relationship between the front wall and the speaker distance. Dips and suck-outs of response can result from this interaction, just as a nice smoothing and increase in detail.
Here is a well written representation of what I'm referring to. The effect in acoustic terms is SBIR, or speaker boundary interference response.
The acoustical interference between your speaker's front radiation, and the reflection from the wall behind a speaker. In the bottom octaves, the wavelengths are so big the reflected energy is still essentially in phase with the direct, forward radiation. But the problem arises as the frequency goes up into the mid-bass and the reflection off the front wall begins to be more and more out of phase due to the extra path it has to travel compared to the main forward radiation of your speakers. The frequency dips occur when the reflected energy begins to be in opposite phase relative to the direct energy. Typically, one can see huge swings in response, as much as 10-20dB deep.
So, you either place them right up against the wall (this is why studio monitors are flush mounted), or far enough away to put the dip below the passband of the speaker. Ideally, they tend to image better away from the boundary, so that's typically where I'd start. But perhaps you may find the placement up against the front wall to be best (or necessary aesthetically). When you place the speaker close to the wall, this raises the frequency of the interaction higher, and up into the range whereby the front energy is more directional so the interference is lessened due to less rearward energy to begin with. At lower freqs, the waves are so big that the radiation becomes almost omni-directional, and much of this occurs within the critical range of imaging and detail. this is why loudspeakers need space around them in general, so that output isn't reflected back and smeared, ...even to the sides etc. This is why cabinetry etc, is so, so detrimental.
All this is based on quarter wavelength cancellation. This is when a speaker is a quarter wavelength away from the boundary, the returning wave becomes one half a wavelength out of phase which is total cancellation. So subs can benefit from being within a quarter wave from their adjacent boundaries, and mains can benefit from being at least a quarter wavelength away from the boundaries. All this is based off the lowest frequency within their operating range for mains, and the highest freq in the operating range for subs.
Wave Length in Feet = 1130 / Frequency
So, 80hz is the ideal example since it's often essentially the subs highest freq, and a mains lowest freq.
1130/80 = 14.125, or about 14 feet long (that's the full sine wave)

So, thinking acoustic interference off an adjacent boundary, we consider quarter wavelengths.
A quarter wave for 80hz is approx 3.5 feet. So placing a sub within that distance from the adjacent surfaces will help in not having the cancellations associated with 1/4 wave boundary interference.
Likewise, placing a LCR loudspeaker, at least a 1/4 wave or greater (of the lowest freq within it's passband) away from the adjacent boundaries, or 3.5 feet or more away, places the dip below 80hz, and below the operating range of the speaker.
Below is a graphic representation of this;

Additionally, another tip is to attempt to not place both the sidewall, and the front wall behind the mains, at the same distance from the speakers. If you stagger these distances somewhat, it further smoothes these types of interactions. Also, if you place acoustic absorption directly behind your mains, directly to the side of your mains, this also reduces the amount of out of phase energy that re-enters the picture, ... thus, reducing the dip even further.
Best of luck

WOW!!! Thank you for all this info. I will have to test a few different setups. I will get my wife to move the speakers around while i listen. lol. Will let you know what the results are. I did notice that the bass from the mains are a little boomy so will def try.
post #3048 of 3360
My humble 802 Diamonds. In the process of being broken in. Driven by a Linn Majik DSM while I wait for a new rack so I can stick in a big iron Mcintosh.

802Diamondsarehome-0030.jpg

802Diamondsarehome-0033.jpg

802Diamondsarehome-0031.jpg

802Diamondsarehome-0032.jpg
post #3049 of 3360
^^^beautiful! cool.gif
post #3050 of 3360
B&W is one of the sexiest speakers on the planet. I've always admired the Nautilus Prestige.

This may have been shown here before, but it's an incredible and very well done DIY project of some knock off Nautilus speakers: ODYSSEY 2
Edited by Hi Def Fan - 9/7/12 at 11:56pm
post #3051 of 3360
I think it's suum quique when it comes to that Nautilus design ....maybe you need to live in a nautilus house like this to appreciate? eek.gif
post #3052 of 3360
I have what you see in my sig for my bedroom setup.
4j2j48.jpg
post #3053 of 3360




Hey everyone, just got my first pair of floorstanders - Monitor Audio Silver RX6 in walnut. Absolutely love them so far, they sound superb, and are built and finished incredibly well.

They reside in my modest stereo/HT setup. First pic is dark but here's all associated equipment in my setup:

Panasonic TC-P55VT50 plasma
Blu-ray: Panasonic DMP-BDT310, Sony BDP-S5000ES
Toshiba HD-A30 HD-DVD player
Marantz SR5006 AVR
Onkyo DX-C380 CD changer
Apple TV (2012)
Audioengine D1 DAC (connected to Apple TV)
Roku LT
MartinLogan Dynamo 700 sub
Panamax M-5100PM

I'm very happy with these...until my next upgrade rolleyes.gif
post #3054 of 3360
Fronts: Gallo Reference 3.1
Center: Gallo Classico CL-C
Surrounds: Gallo A'Diva Ti
Sub: CHT CS18.1 (soon to be paired with a CHT SS18.1)
Rcvr: Onkyo 3009
Pwr Amp: Adcom GFA-7705

Other Equipment: Adcom GFA-5800 (will be powering SS18.1)
Merlin Signature IV Speakers
Audio Research SP-9
SOTA Sapphire Turntable
Souther Linear Arm
Audioquest 404 MC cartridge
Outlaw 970 Processor
Onkyo 5007 (defunct HDMI board)
post #3055 of 3360
Front: Tyler Acoustic Decade D2

Center: Tyler Acoustic Decade Center

Rear: B & W DM 601- S3

Sub: SVS PB13-Ultra
post #3056 of 3360
Hello everyone,

Fronts are infinity Beta 40's, Center is Beta C250, rears are Beta 20's. Sub is a Klipsch XD-300. Blu-Ray is an Oppo-BDP-93. Receiver is Onkyo-605. TV is 60" Pioneer Plasma PDP-6070. Love it big time. biggrin.gif

Thanks
Mike
post #3057 of 3360
Hello,
Front are Klipsch WF-35 Icon-W Series Espresso with new Dayton Audio XO2W-2.5K 2-Way Crossover 2,500 Hz.
Center is Klipsch WC-24 Icon-W Series Espresso with new Dayton Audio XO2W-2.5K 2-Way Crossover 2,500 Hz.
Rear are Klipsch WS-24 Icon-W Series Espresso with new Dayton Audio XO2W-2.5K 2-Way Crossover 2,500 Hz.
Front height and wide are BIC America DV62si Bookshelf.
Receiver is Onkyo 3009.
Bluray player is Pana 310.

I totally love them so much.

Thanks.
post #3058 of 3360
energy all around...

fr l/r rc 50's

center rc-lcr

rears rc 30's

sub pc13u svs
post #3059 of 3360
Main Room: Klipsch Reference RF-7ii (mains)
Klipsch Reference RC-64ii (center)
Klipsch Reference RS-62ii (surrounds)
JTR Captivator

Aux Room: Polk RT-16 (mains)
Polk CS-350 (center)
Polk rear speakers?

Bedroom: Energy RC-10 (2)

Aux room 2: Energy RC Micro 5.0
Bic America F12
post #3060 of 3360
Mirage OMD (Fronts)

Mirage OMD C2 (Center)

Mirage OMD OMDR's (Sides)

Def Tech SR8040 (rears)
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