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Samsung 2006 DLP HDTV Discussion --- HLSxxxxW Models - Page 3

post #61 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmurphy88 View Post

Apparently, the HL-S5679 is wobulated. See this comment on the Engadget post. Also unnoticed is the fact that the color-wheel sets have RGBCMY 6-color wheels.

17. I'm a DLP employee at CES at the moment and thought I'd set things straight a bit on the Samsung and LED DLP in general.



Samsung's LED TV here is in fact wobulated -- it's the same 1080p chip used in all the DLP 1080p sets on the market at the moment, although this is in fact true 1080p of course. I know there's some idealogical objection out there to SmoothPicture, but honestly I believe it makes a better picture. To me it looks like more like smooth film. Non-SmoothPicture does make sense in our projectors where computer graphics are more the norm.



On the LED system, of course color is still sequential since we use a single panel, but with LEDs, the colors can be switched far far more quickly than a colorwheel's speed -- it's the equivalent of something like a 48x colorwheel. I'd challenge anybody to see any rainbow in that.



We're also starting to take further advantage of our single panel display with the color-wheel based systems. If you're at the show, you can see the other TV we're showing next to the Samsung. It's a 70" 1080p system using a 6-color (RGBCMY) colorwheel that gives it a really awesome looking color gamut. The 3LCD guys are going to be pretty angry when everybody realizes that having to use 3 panels means you can't have more than 3 colors.



Finally, in response to mirror flipping causing some kind of low-level flicker, the DLP panel's switching speed is so fast that there is absolutely no way that anyone could perceive it.



Oh and the dimensions of the LED Samsung are about the same as their standard set.



Hope this helped clear up any confusion.

I was really hoping for no wobulation ...

Thanks for posting this information ... at this point I think the Engadget claim of a non-wobulated chip in the HLS5679W can be totally dismissed. It is just using the new .65" xHD5 1080p chip. I do agree with the CES employee commenting about the wobulated image. Once you get used to the smooth image, it is very nice. I have wobulated (1080p) and non-wobulated (720p) sets in my home and I prefer the smoother wobulated picture. I also believe that if they started using a non-wobulated 1080p they could probably get to a better picture eventually. But, since we are in a period of wobulated chips it makes sense to be objective about the advantages of a smooth picture.
post #62 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdtvbostonma View Post

VIDEOPARK...Would the 2005 7-segment Samsung 1080p DLP's provide more accurate & richer colors than the 2006 3-LED 1080p's?

I would suggest it would. LEDs are known to be a bit "spike-ey" in their response. That is, the colors are very narrow in spectrum so you would have less accurate colors when processed. LED lights for the theatre are used that produce a very strong colors but the lighting designers I have talked with say that can't produce certain colors due to the narrow spectrum.

The LED array is better than fluorescent backlighting on LCD direct-view screens but is not as good as a white light from an incandescent bulb, IMHO. I think you will see very strong colors on the LED set but some colors won't reproduce as well as the bulb set.

It's a great idea and will eliminate bulb replacement and any noise from the color wheel. As LED technology improves, we'll have better colors and brighter screens. But be careful about the first generation of anything!
Quote:


Also, as far as RBE, it seems that a either a Samsung or TI rep claims that with the higher refresh rate of LCD, he challenges anyone to see RBE. Sounds similar to the RBE claims of my Samsung 1080p!

The faster the refresh, the less possible it is to see RBE. I don't see it on my 2005 1080p set.

I've even read that some people claim to see RBE on CRTs. I don't believe they do.
post #63 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by TWD View Post

FYI - Samsung is a Korean company.

Samsung strategy is to offer superior performance products which enables them to charge more than the inexpensive Chinese products of similar basic technology.
The Chinese were first to offer a 1920*1080@60Hz panel LCD last year. Samsung is discontinuing their line of 32" LCDs. It is a battle for market dominance.
There is also a huge battle between thin plasma, LCD and (the getting thinner) rear projectors. The bottom line is that Samsung has to improve their products to survive.

Some of us have waiting over 6-7 years for them to wake up. Their use of powerful LEDs in rear projection is most welcome.
post #64 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by reincarnate View Post

My concern is that the display should accurately reproduce what the camera captured. But for many others, the new fantasy colors will provide a much needed escape from the real world.

Unfortunately, I bet most consumers would pick the set with over-saturated chroma vs. an accurate display.
post #65 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Videopark View Post

I would suggest it would. LEDs are known to be a bit "spike-ey" in their response. That is, the colors are very narrow in spectrum so you would have less accurate colors when processed. LED lights for the theatre are used that produce a very strong colors but the lighting designers I have talked with say that can't produce certain colors due to the narrow spectrum.

The LED array is better than fluorescent backlighting on LCD direct-view screens but is not as good as a white light from an incandescent bulb, IMHO. I think you will see very strong colors on the LED set but some colors won't reproduce as well as the bulb set.

It's a great idea and will eliminate bulb replacement and any noise from the color wheel. As LED technology improves, we'll have better colors and brighter screens. But be careful about the first generation of anything!


The faster the refresh, the less possible it is to see RBE. I don't see it on my 2005 1080p set.

I've even read that some people claim to see RBE on CRTs. I don't believe they do.


I didn't see RBE for the 1st two months I had this set, then all of a sudden I could notice them. Only on a large all black section of the picture, and only whan looking away from the screen rapidly. Not a problem when looking at the screen during normal viewing.

As far as LED color reproduction, I would suspect that the 6th gen. color wheel is better. But by how much? Not having to replace the bulb every few years might make the LED a better overall choice. But the 1st gen. thing is usually not good.........
post #66 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Videopark View Post

I would suggest it would. LEDs are known to be a bit "spike-ey" in their response. That is, the colors are very narrow in spectrum so you would have less accurate colors when processed. LED lights for the theatre are used that produce a very strong colors but the lighting designers I have talked with say that can't produce certain colors due to the narrow spectrum.

The LED array is better than fluorescent backlighting on LCD direct-view screens but is not as good as a white light from an incandescent bulb, IMHO. I think you will see very strong colors on the LED set but some colors won't reproduce as well as the bulb set.

It's a great idea and will eliminate bulb replacement and any noise from the color wheel. As LED technology improves, we'll have better colors and brighter screens. But be careful about the first generation of anything!


The faster the refresh, the less possible it is to see RBE. I don't see it on my 2005 1080p set.

I've even read that some people claim to see RBE on CRTs. I don't believe they do.


I didn't see RBE for the 1st two months I had this set, then all of a sudden I could notice them. Only on a large all black section of the picture, and only when looking away from the screen rapidly. Not a problem when looking at the screen during normal viewing.

As far as LED color reproduction, I would suspect that the 6th gen. color wheel is better. But by how much? Not having to replace the bulb every few years might make the LED a better overall choice. But the 1st gen. thing is usually not good.........
post #67 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Videopark View Post

The LED array is better than fluorescent backlighting on LCD direct-view screens but is not as good as a white light from an cbulb, IMHO. I think you will see very strong colors on the LED set but some colors won't reproduce as well as the bulb set.

Totally wrong post. Incandescent lights do not even produce white color.
LED's offer a color spectrum 130% of a UHP bulb. I've purchased many 1-5 watt LED flashlights. Each generation is whiter and with better consistency. LEDs can be graded too.
Try the Coast Lenser V2 from Sams Club for $30. It outputs an amazing bright pure white pocket rocket light:
http://www.pumaknives.com/?n=store&b=43&pl=232&p=594
post #68 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by reincarnate View Post

Totally wrong post. Incandescent lights do not even produce white color.
LED's offer a color spectrum 130% of a UHP bulb. I've purchased many 1-5 watt LED flashlights. Each generation is whiter and with better consistency. LEDs can be graded too.
Try the Coast Lenser V2 from Sams Club for $30. It outputs an amazing bright pure white pocket rocket light:
http://www.pumaknives.com/?n=store&b=43&pl=232&p=594

I wasn't talking about flashlights.

Incandescent bulbs of course produce white at 3200 degrees Kelvin and Xenon bulbs are incandescent bulbs that are made bluer (higher degree Kelvin) with the addition of the Xenon gas.

I'm sure you know that movie and television studios use incandescent bulbs (quartz iodine) to illuminate sets. If they didn't produce white, they couldn't be used.

I am not sure what you mean by, "...each generation is whiter". Do you mean more blue? If it was white in the last generation, how can it be more white now?

" The pure Xenon bulb used in the Qualia 004 has a smooth wide spectrum that closely tracks the sun's spectrum. The result is deeper and better defined colors."

"Sunlight and light bulbs are thermal radiators that generate light by thermal movement of atoms and electrons. Non-thermal light sources, or cold emitters, such as neon, fluorescents, HID or LEDs, are different. Exchange a white LED for an incandescent lightbulb, and you'll see that the rainbow no longer contains all colors, but mainly blue and yellow, or blue and narrow red and green bands."

White LEDs use a blue or nearly ultraviolet LED, and an orange and yellow, or green and red, fluorescent powder in close proximity to the emitting crystal. Thus, white LEDs don't emit a full-spectrum white, but, instead, narrow color bands. This is why white LEDs lack the color rendering needed for lighting applications.

One could claim that mixing three or four LED colors could create a good, full-spectrum white. However, narrow LED emission bands don't overlap. Thus, they generate a white spectrum with gaps.

http://www.signweb.com/neon/cont/allwhites.html

So you see it is not just the width of the color spectrum but the narrow bands of color that present problems in reproducing an even and full color spectrum.
post #69 of 4534
I know everyone hates these type of questions, but I feel compelled to ask anyway.

I've been following these forums for over a year in an earnest quest to help me decide which TV to get for my first HDTV purchase. Early on DLP seemed to be the best choice for me.

After much waffling and procrastinating, I decided on the HLR5067 last fall, but couldn't bring myself to actually make the purchase until this weekend. I take delivery on Wednesday.

Now I just noticed this thread announcing new models, with seemingly a new generation of technology. Would it maybe be wise to return the purchase and just sit on my heels while the new set come out and see how they change the ballgame? I know you can always get yourself into this trap of "waiting for the next big thing", but when you're actually at that point of having to make that decision, it's hard to write it off as nontrivial.

I'm not typically an early adopter or technology. Well, most my friends would say I am. Maybe better to say I'm not a 'first adopter', but maybe a 'second adopter' So, I'm not really comfortable being the guinea pig with brand new stuff. Are the technology changes in Samsungs new DLP line that different that someone like me would be better off not jumping at right away?

thanks for any opinions on the matter

Chris
post #70 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanzbodeli View Post

I know everyone hates these type of questions, but I feel compelled to ask anyway.

I've been following these forums for over a year in an earnest quest to help me decide which TV to get for my first HDTV purchase. Early on DLP seemed to be the best choice for me.

After much waffling and procrastinating, I decided on the HLR5067 last fall, but couldn't bring myself to actually make the purchase until this weekend. I take delivery on Wednesday.

Now I just noticed this thread announcing new models, with seemingly a new generation of technology. Would it maybe be wise to return the purchase and just sit on my heels while the new set come out and see how they change the ballgame? I know you can always get yourself into this trap of "waiting for the next big thing", but when you're actually at that point of having to make that decision, it's hard to write it off as nontrivial.

I'm not typically an early adopter or technology. Well, most my friends would say I am. Maybe better to say I'm not a 'first adopter', but maybe a 'second adopter' So, I'm not really comfortable being the guinea pig with brand new stuff. Are the technology changes in Samsungs new DLP line that different that someone like me would be better off not jumping at right away?

thanks for any opinions on the matter

Chris

The option that I would consider is: could I get a 2006 1080p set for just a little more than I am paying for this 2005 720p set. Samsung has narrowed the price gap between the 720p and 1080p sets to $500 in 2006 and lowered the prices on both the 720p and 1080p units. Since Samsung is projecting these new models to be available in April (hahaha), you might not have to wait that long to get a 2nd generation 1080p. The second HDMI input is probably worth the difference in cost.
post #71 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCSB View Post

The option that I would consider is: could I get a 2006 1080p set for just a little more than I am paying for this 2005 720p set. Samsung has narrowed the price gap between the 720p and 1080p sets to $500 in 2006 and lowered the prices on both the 720p and 1080p units. Since Samsung is projecting these new models to be available in April (hahaha), you might not have to wait that long to get a 2nd generation 1080p. The second HDMI input is probably worth the difference in cost.

Well, you hit right on one of the pieces of released information I'm most curious about: release date. If I recall correctly, last year's HLR models were originally slated to come out in Mar/Apr as well, but as we all know they really didn't start becoming available until well into the summer.

Do you think it's safe to assume the same will apply to HLS models?

Chris
post #72 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanzbodeli View Post

Well, you hit right on one of the pieces of released information I'm most curious about: release date. If I recall correctly, last year's HLR models were originally slated to come out in Mar/Apr as well, but as we all know they really didn't start becoming available until well into the summer.

Do you think it's safe to assume the same will apply to HLS models?

Chris

The Mar/April releases were almost on time - but those were the 720P models and the 1080P models were June release but arrived about a month late with TVA PB.

Waiting or not is personal judgement since Samsung had at least three variations released in about 13 months last year with the larger model sizes suffering from long overdue debuts. At some point you can decide to pull the trigger and if you've waited this long I would grab the one that you see and it says "BUY ME" to your eyes and it fits your budget. There are +- to both.The manner and speed that Samsung innovates and revolves generations you could be waitiing and waiting . . .
post #73 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdtvbostonma View Post

I didn't see RBE for the 1st two months I had this set, then all of a sudden I could notice them. Only on a large all black section of the picture, and only when looking away from the screen rapidly. Not a problem when looking at the screen during normal viewing.

As far as LED color reproduction, I would suspect that the 6th gen. color wheel is better. But by how much? Not having to replace the bulb every few years might make the LED a better overall choice. But the 1st gen. thing is usually not good.........

There's simply no way we should be able to see RBE on the new LED - the new system is approximately 48 times faster than current fastest color wheels apparently too fast for human eye to detect it. The Samsung data sheet confirms NO RBE but I'm sure RBE victims will put this new baby to a torture test and let us know.
post #74 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanzbodeli View Post

Well, you hit right on one of the pieces of released information I'm most curious about: release date. If I recall correctly, last year's HLR models were originally slated to come out in Mar/Apr as well, but as we all know they really didn't start becoming available until well into the summer.

Do you think it's safe to assume the same will apply to HLS models?

Chris

If you assume May, you will probably be close ... i.e. +/- a month.
post #75 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCSB View Post

If you assume May, you will probably be close ... i.e. +/- a month.


I agree. The May/ June release dates last year were delayed because Samsung and the other 1080P manufacturers were waiting for TI to release the new chips to volume production, and then apparently needed a few months to do final production. From watching and waiting last year I seem to remember that TI didn't release the new chip until May. If TI hasn't changed the chip this time, but the manufacturers are making changes to the light engine, I would assume that the product release dates will be a bit quicker than last year.

As others have pointed out, there is a huge amount of competition with other substitute types of HDTV, so you will see Samsung and others introducing new products to both improve quality and drop the price.
post #76 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Another not so great shot of the HLS5679W ....



http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/art...rticle_id=1176
post #77 of 4534
Thread Starter 
The new sets from a XBox 360 gaming perspective: http://news.teamxbox.com/xbox/10003/...80p-DLP-HDTVs/
post #78 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by westa6969 View Post

There's simply no way we should be able to see RBE on the new LED - the new system is approximately 48 times faster than current fastest color wheels apparently too fast for human eye to detect it. The Samsung data sheet confirms NO RBE but I'm sure RBE victims will put this new baby to a torture test and let us know.

I think you have the refresh rate for the LED's a bit faster than they really will be. The current color wheels are 6x while the LEDs are 48x. Yes this is 8 times faster than the current color wheels and should make a significant difference (I hope).
post #79 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by reincarnate View Post

The CIE color NTSC/PAL standards define, green and blue points as a triangle on the black body chart. Pure red, green and blue should precisely match these points in both saturation and hue.
Sony got the consumers juices going with the SXRD, and many here gladly fell for the oversaturated colors (something never experienced before). Now it is the DLP camps turn using new hardware (6 color ASIC processing) and also LED light sources.

My concern is that the display should accurately reproduce what the camera captured. But for many others, the new fantasy colors will provide a much needed escape from the real world.

With a three panel or three color system you have to oversaturate the primaries
to product colors like yellow. By adding yellow, one does need to over saturate
colors to produce it. The overall picture will look more brighter...

In my opinion, you don't want to oversaute any of the colors - you want to
accurately produce the colors. Some people may prefer "Disneyland color"
but I prefer perfectly accurate colors...
post #80 of 4534
At CES, HP had a LED backlighted DLP right next to their current 65 in. DLP.

The 65 in. DLP had a signicantly better PQ, in my opinion. ( the LED backlighted
DLP was even smaller than the 65 in. DLP ) ...
post #81 of 4534
Any word about the AKAI yet ?

"Samsung and AKAI will soon begin shipment of new DLP RPTVs that replace the color wheel as well as the projection lamp with sequentially fired red, green, blue (RGB) LEDs. In addition to producing a wider color gamut, the LEDs used in these televisions are conservatively rated at 20,000 hoursfar longer longevity than any incandescent bulb used in today's RPTVs. The use of LEDs as a light source in RPTVs eliminates another moving part (the color wheel), reduces the amount heat generated (decreasing fan noise), and significantly shortens the time it takes the television to achieve full brightness.

The AKAI PT52DL27L and PT42DL27L are 52-inch and 42-inch RPTVs, respectively, that incorporate LED light engines. These displays utilize TI's 1080p DLP chip that drives two pixels with each micromirror (HP's Wobulation technology). Digital cable ready, the new AKAI RPTVs feature integrated over-the-air tuners. The PT42DL27L will start shipping March 2006 and cost $1799 (list). The 52-inch PT52DL27L will ship May 2006 and cost $2199 (list)."
post #82 of 4534
Ok..so I tried to weed through this for the answer, but I'm not very bright. Can somebody summarize what <50 in models they will have next year?? I assume there will still be no 1080p model at 46? If not what is the difference in the 46 this year and in 06? Thanks in advance.
post #83 of 4534
Samsung will offer 1080p at 50" and above
"In total, Samsung will offer seven models with 1,080p resolution in the 50W-inch, 56W-inch, 61W-inch, 67W-inch and 71W-inch screen sizes in 2006. The price premium for 1,080p will drop from $1,000 in 2005 to $500 in the DLP line, Sanduski said. On average, pricing will be about $750 lower than 2005 MAP levels on 1,080p models."
No Word about 46"
"In 720p DLP, screen sizes will include 42W inches, 50W inches, 56W inches and 61W inches. Pricing on 720p models will average $200 to $300 lower than 2005 MAP levels, Sanduski said. The company will continue to offer derivative models in the 56W-inch and 61W-inch screen sizes for different distribution channels."
post #84 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottrleo1 View Post

Ok..so I tried to weed through this for the answer, but I'm not very bright. Can somebody summarize what <50 in models they will have next year?? I assume there will still be no 1080p model at 46? If not what is the difference in the 46 this year and in 06? Thanks in advance.

There will NOT be a 1080p set below 50". I'm hoping that some people that attended the show and returned home today will join the discussion with some photos and notes over the next few days. I think that we want to wait for more info before attempting to summarize the 2006 line-up.
post #85 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCSB View Post

There will NOT be a 1080p set below 50". I'm hoping that some people that attended the show and returned home today will join the discussion with some photos and notes over the next few days. I think that we want to wait for more info before attempting to summarize the 2006 line-up.

I took a digital camera with me and after a few pictures found out that I had a
major problem and it was not recording pictures...

I personally do not consider the LED backlight systems to be an improvement to
to upgrade to unless you see rainbows or will use a video processor or Computer that
advantage of the 1080p HDMI input. Supposely the video lag is much less.
post #86 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanzbodeli View Post

I know everyone hates these type of questions, but I feel compelled to ask anyway.

I've been following these forums for over a year in an earnest quest to help me decide which TV to get for my first HDTV purchase. Early on DLP seemed to be the best choice for me.

After much waffling and procrastinating, I decided on the HLR5067 last fall, but couldn't bring myself to actually make the purchase until this weekend. I take delivery on Wednesday.

Now I just noticed this thread announcing new models, with seemingly a new generation of technology. Would it maybe be wise to return the purchase and just sit on my heels while the new set come out and see how they change the ballgame? I know you can always get yourself into this trap of "waiting for the next big thing", but when you're actually at that point of having to make that decision, it's hard to write it off as nontrivial.

I'm not typically an early adopter or technology. Well, most my friends would say I am. Maybe better to say I'm not a 'first adopter', but maybe a 'second adopter' So, I'm not really comfortable being the guinea pig with brand new stuff. Are the technology changes in Samsungs new DLP line that different that someone like me would be better off not jumping at right away?

thanks for any opinions on the matter

Chris

I am in pretty much the same situation. I've been lurking around for a year to find the right HDTV. I had pretty much decided on the HLR5078W as a great 1080p set that would fit our needs. I was originally going to buy it for Xmas, but decided to wait a few extra days to see what CES had to announce. The main reason I was not pulling the trigger was that the HDMI input doesn't take 1080p. Which I am still completely stunned by. HP can do it, why can't Samsung. Anyway, I am glad to see that it seems like the HLS will fix that issue. Although not confirmed I would be completely floored if they didn't fix that major flaw in their product line up.

Anyway, if the dimensions work out for our entertainment center I will go with the 50" HLS in April or May. I don't think the LED will give me any major advantage for the extra money I would have to fork out. Nor would the TV fit into our entertainment center.
post #87 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uwsc11 View Post

I am in pretty much the same situation. I've been lurking around for a year to find the right HDTV. I had pretty much decided on the HLR5078W as a great 1080p set that would fit our needs. I was originally going to buy it for Xmas, but decided to wait a few extra days to see what CES had to announce. The main reason I was not pulling the trigger was that the HDMI input doesn't take 1080p. Which I am still completely stunned by. HP can do it, why can't Samsung. Anyway, I am glad to see that it seems like the HLS will fix that issue. Although not confirmed I would be completely floored if they didn't fix that major flaw in their product line up.

Anyway, if the dimensions work out for our entertainment center I will go with the 50" HLS in April or May. I don't think the LED will give me any major advantage for the extra money I would have to fork out. Nor would the TV fit into our entertainment center.

I think that it has been confirmed through a number of sources that the HLS 1080p models will accept 1080p on the HDMI inputs. We can count on that ... but, there are still a number of open questions. Like what computer support will be offered over HDMI.
post #88 of 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Videopark View Post

I wasn't talking about flashlights.

Incandescent bulbs of course produce white at 3200 degrees Kelvin and Xenon bulbs are incandescent bulbs that are made bluer (higher degree Kelvin) with the addition of the Xenon gas.

I'm sure you know that movie and television studios use incandescent bulbs (quartz iodine) to illuminate sets. If they didn't produce white, they couldn't be used.

I am not sure what you mean by, "...each generation is whiter". Do you mean more blue? If it was white in the last generation, how can it be more white now?

" The pure Xenon bulb used in the Qualia 004 has a smooth wide spectrum that closely tracks the sun's spectrum. The result is deeper and better defined colors."

"Sunlight and light bulbs are thermal radiators that generate light by thermal movement of atoms and electrons. Non-thermal light sources, or cold emitters, such as neon, fluorescents, HID or LEDs, are different. Exchange a white LED for an incandescent lightbulb, and you'll see that the rainbow no longer contains all colors, but mainly blue and yellow, or blue and narrow red and green bands."

White LEDs use a blue or nearly ultraviolet LED, and an orange and yellow, or green and red, fluorescent powder in close proximity to the emitting crystal. Thus, white LEDs don't emit a full-spectrum white, but, instead, narrow color bands. This is why white LEDs lack the color rendering needed for lighting applications.

One could claim that mixing three or four LED colors could create a good, full-spectrum white. However, narrow LED emission bands don't overlap. Thus, they generate a white spectrum with gaps.

http://www.signweb.com/neon/cont/allwhites.html

So you see it is not just the width of the color spectrum but the narrow bands of color that present problems in reproducing an even and full color spectrum.

3200 degrees kelvin in not white to any display or standard. The $3000.00 bulb in the Qualia 004 is nowhere near reality for anyone.

LED's are capable of producing a wider color gamut superior to other types of common and practical display lights. The new Coast 30 flashlight (besides being very practical) will demonstrate its purity to anyone.

TI loves LEDs so sit back and enjoy the ride:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=628374
post #89 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Here is a link to the spec sheet on the HP LED set: http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...80nHDTVlvh.pdf

It is not the Samsung set, but probably uses the same basic technology. It has a few key specs, including a contrast ratio of 2,500:1. If this spec is carried over into the Samsung set, it can give us the first important spec for making a comparison to the lamp based sets.
post #90 of 4534
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UCSB View Post

Here is a link to the spec sheet on the HP LED set: http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...80nHDTVlvh.pdf

It is not the Samsung set, but probably uses the same basic technology. It has a few key specs, including a contrast ratio of 2,500:1. If this spec is carried over into the Samsung set, it can give us the first important spec for making a comparison to the lamp based sets.

Also notice the spec sheet is saying that HP is using the xHD4. So I think this means that we have to be careful about assuming everyone is automatically making the jump to the new xHD5 with the products they are showing.
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