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The official Ruby Calibration Q/A Thread - Page 2

post #31 of 615
Andy, I am assuming that my unit is just very badly in need of calibration. It's not just the reds...the pinkish faces disturb me considerably more. Right now I am pretty disgusted, so maybe after a good night's sleep and a fresh start tomorrow I will see things differently.

If anyone has a unit that they feel looks incredibly good, maybe he would be kind enough to post his settings. Maybe I am overlooking some basic setting in a menu somewhere that is wreaking havoc with my picture.

BTW, I am currently using a 100" wide Firehawk, as the lamp is new and quite bright on that screen/size combination. I tried it on a High Power of the same size, and though it helped the colors look more vivid (naturally - they were brighter, but still not accurate), the black level was elevated much too high for such a new lamp.
post #32 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Sorel View Post

The EyeOne Pro is the sensor itself - "Beamer" is a software/accessory package that is bundled with the EyeOne Pro sensor. I also bought the "Beamer" package, as it includes a tripod mount and more importantly, a diffuser for taking readings directly from the light source. You can not buy the diffuser separately.

I've checked GretagMacbeth website. EyeOne Beamer is a package of software plus EyeOne Pro sensor. There are only two types of sensors called EyeOne Display2 and EyeOne Pro. I've compared the specification between GretagMacbeth and Colorfacts. Both are same. It means the sensor bundling with existing Colorfacts is Eyeone Pro (even Colorfacts call it as Eyeone Beamer).

I own a old Eyeone sensor bundling with Colorfact 3.x version. My Eyeone sensor is named Eyeone Monitor whose part number is different from Eyeone Pro. So I guess Eyeone Pro is a upgraded version of Eyeone Monitor.

Do you guys find it is named as Eyeone Pro in the label on the sensor?
post #33 of 615
lovingdvd,

I think it is not worth to lower the contrast so as to minimise the BC. I think a better way to do so is tweaking its iris mode with factory mode or customising the gamma curve.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...4&page=3&pp=30

I used 75 contrast at Auto Iris which has accurate D65 tracking and higher on/off contrast than Sony's specification.
post #34 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Sorel View Post

Andy, I am assuming that my unit is just very badly in need of calibration. It's not just the reds...the pinkish faces disturb me considerably more. Right now I am pretty disgusted, so maybe after a good night's sleep and a fresh start tomorrow I will see things differently.

If anyone has a unit that they feel looks incredibly good, maybe he would be kind enough to post his settings. Maybe I am overlooking some basic setting in a menu somewhere that is wreaking havoc with my picture.

BTW, I am currently using a 100" wide Firehawk, as the lamp is new and quite bright on that screen/size combination. I tried it on a High Power of the same size, and though it helped the colors look more vivid (naturally - they were brighter, but still not accurate), the black level was elevated much too high for such a new lamp.

Bob,

My comment I guess was more directed at myself. Meaning I'm a rookie at all this and hadn't realized my Barco was orange until I read it on the fourms. Then I started to compare and notice it. Now with the Ruby I'm thinking that I'm seeing very nice reds but it could be that ignorance is bliss.

I'm hoping William Phelps comes up with some tricks for the Ruby and get everything calibrated at that time. I'm interested in reading what your final evaluation of the Ruby is. BTW, what are you feeding the Ruby?
post #35 of 615
Hi Greg,

I calibrated a Ruby last week and found the DI sure does complicate a Grayscale calibration and gamma measurements. I was planning on calling you with what I found, but thought that this thread might serve just as well.

I had a different experience with the RCP. I was able to target the primaries and secondaries using the RCP. I had to make adjustments in each color's "targeting" (this might not be the exact word used in the Sony menu) and "range" before the hue and saturation controls worked as expected. Even at that, they did not respond in a strictly linear fashion as one would wish. However, I was able to move all six colors to coincide with the rec 709 standards (at least according to an Eye-One Pro spectrophotometer).

I had the same experience as you in setting the colorspace from "Wide" to the "Normal" setting. It moved their positions a very small amount in color space, not enough to see movement in their positions in a CIE chart.

I sent the Ruby's HDMI input a 480i YCbCr signal with the Accupel and with an HDMI DVD player. I didn't have an HDMI cable so I used a DVI cable with HDMI adapters on both ends. In both cases, the Ruby saw the signal as RGB and didn't apply color decoding. I saw no way to force the Ruby to do so. So far every PJ I have tried this with has responded the same way when set to Auto (decoding matrix). (The Infocus SP7200 allows one to specify the decoding matrix and this PJ could be forced to properly decode YCbCr over DVI.) I believe your review said that your Ruby accepted YCbCr over HDMI. I wasn't able to make this work. I am returning with a true HDMI cable to try again, but I doubt that it will make a difference. Do you have any suggestions?

Thanks for your input on this forum. Your expertise is very appreciated.

Glenn
post #36 of 615
Few questions (not familiar with the Ruby at all, but just out of general interest):

1. Is the actual calibration done on screen, or are you using software supplied by Sony?

2. Given the problems people are getting with calibration with dynamic iris, why not use full field gray patterns (instead of window patterns)?

3. How do you calibrate gamma using dyanmic iris? Isn't the whole point of dynamic iris contrast stretching (i.e., gamma is a solluable concept)?
post #37 of 615
i'm not in this business.
but it is 2006 and technology is everywhere.
pj should not be calibrated at the factory and end users should not have to do all the complex work you all are posting about.
they sould self calibrate when set-up and continuously re-calibrate whenever they are turned on. i'm sure this would be an inexpensive peice of cake to engineer with 2006 technology, maybe fifty bucks. this is especially true of Toshiba, Sony and Canon projectors. they are huge and have other real world displays. i use imaging all day, everyday in my work. i know the technology is there to have displays perform to certain conventions. this whole calibration thing is nothing but an operator dependent blast from the past. however, like everyone else, i'll have to get it done.

maybe the insiders can start working to update the industry.
post #38 of 615
Thread Starter 
After reading the advice from Greg posted earlier in this thread, I decided to recalibrate with Contrast at 80 and Brightness at 50. Previously I had used Contrast of 69 to try and be proactive about brightness compression, but it wasn't worth the tradeoff in contrast ratio and brightness IMO - especially because I've yet to notice any brightness compression issues.

First I will list my settings, and then I will cover the process I used.

Contrast 80, Brightness 50, Lamp at 40 hours

____IRIS ON | OFF | AUTO

Gain R: _96 | _90 | _90
Gain G: 100 | 101 | 100
Gain B: 116 | 112 | 114

Bias R: 131 | 128 | 137
Bias G: 129 | 129 | 130
Bias B: 133 | 134 | 136


RESULTS
======
The above resulted in D65 from 30-100 with 0 or 1 dE for most IREs and dE of 2 or 3 (but no more than 3) at a few IREs. This was also the case with the Iris AUTO mode when measuring windows or full fields.

Overall I only had to give up about 15% of light output compared to the default settings to calculate to D65, which I thought was pretty good (56 cd/m2 prior Vs 46 cd/m2 post).

Note that I say 30-100 IRE and not 0-100 or 20-100. This is because I have a problem with ColorFacts/EyeOne reading at 20 IRE. It just goes bonkers. For example, at 30 IRE I get a good reading say D65 dE 0. But at 20 it'll read a dE of 15 with 115% red. Then I lower red bias by 1 click and remeasure and then red is 95% - just from lowering the red bias by a single click! This is obviously a meter issue as the EyeOne is said to not perform well from 20 and below. Anyone else experience this as well? So for 20 and below I just look at how the gray ramps, steps and windows look compared to 30.

PROCEDURE
========
First I calibrated with Iris OFF using window patterns, which produced the same results against full fields as expected.

Next I copied these settings to Iris AUTO as a starting point. I then calibrated using window patterns. Next I checked these settings against the 20,40,75, and 100 full fields on the original VE. This was great because the full fields on VE do not fill up the screen because it is 4:3.

So this essentially provided another window pattern that was much larger than the regular window pattern, yet had a lower APL than a full field. In other words this was a good step in between windows and real full fields. So I then had to tweak the calibration (in auto iris mode) to adjust for the changes made by the auto iris.

Next I then used the 20/40/60/80/100 full fields from DVE. Again I had to tweak the grayscale to get this back to D65 within a dE of 3. Then I went back and checked against the windows. I can't recall exactly but it was either perfect at that point, or I had to make just a tiny tweak (maybe change a setting or two by 1).

At that point I had D65 within dE of 3 in auto iris mode for both window patterns and full fields - sweet! All in all it only took a little over an hour (not including set up time).

CAUTION: During your calibration do not switch input resolution without first saving your changes to memory (assuming you are happy with what you have so far). Otherwise your work will be lost. For instance, I switched my Bravo from 1080i to 720p and it dropped all my changes. This was after I had everything tweaked perfectly. Fortunately I had written the settings down so it was easy to get back where I was.

[Note that I made these changes directly in the service mode in Custom 1 and set my color temp in the user menu to Custom 1. This is important to note because if you make these changes in the user menu instead - IIRC - I think it applies these changes to the preset color temp. So in other words the preset changes things to X, then you are changing X by your custom gain/bias numbers. This result could be significantly different than having the #s in the user menu still at 0 and changing things in the service menu... Do not however make changes in the service menu unless you first write all default #s down and you know what you are doing.]

If you guys try these settings please post back how they look on your Ruby and how many hours you have on the lamp. I am curious how transferrable these numbers are to other units with similar hours on the bulb. If you do not have calibration equipment you can get a feel for whether these numbers are on target by looking at grey steps, ramps and people's faces and to see whether white looks pure or is too cool (blue) or warm (red).

The one issue I continue to struggle with is that I cannot get good readings of the primaries. This prevents me from tweaking my colors because I cannot get an accurate gamut to see where my coords are vs. rec 709.

Others say they use the EyeOne and ColorFacts to do this, so I should be able to do the same. I thought maybe the issue was with my Bravo. So I hooked up a different DVD player via component, changed my color space from HDTV to NTSC, and measured the primaries off of that device. They were coming up incorrectly and just like I saw on the Bravo.

I don't know if this is enough evidence to rule out my source as the problem or not, but based on this it certainly seems that it's less likely. Here I am 3 years later and still struggling with this same issue just on a different pj... Man I really would like to resolve this once and for all.

If anyone has some ideas on things I can try to get accurate primary readings so I can tweak my colors, please let me know. In the meantime if someone can please post the exact changes they've made to color/RCP controls to dial in the colors I'd greatly appreciate it.
post #39 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd View Post

Note that I say 30-100 IRE and not 0-100 or 20-100. This is because I have a problem with ColorFacts/EyeOne reading at 20 IRE. It just goes bonkers. For example, at 30 IRE I get a good reading say D65 dE 0. But at 20 it'll read a dE of 15 with 115% red. Then I lower red bias by 1 click and remeasure and then red is 95% - just from lowering the red bias by a single click! This is obviously a meter issue as the EyeOne is said to not perform well from 20 and below. Anyone else experience this as well? So for 20 and below I just look at how the gray ramps, steps and windows look compared to 30.

I think you have been bitten by the 'wandering' eye-one problem.

I have both the eye-one and a trichromat sensor with Colorfacts 6 Pro. After putting up with the behavior of the eye-one for months, I retired it. Perhaps it's just this one, but I don't think so. The behavior is this: Within less than ten minutes of a Dark Reading, the low IRE readings (below 40) of the eye-one would start drifting. Do a read at 30 IRE, then do the same one again and get an entirely different result. It gets more extreme as the IRE level you're trying to read gets lower, and it affects red readings the most. The only way to reset it for 5-10 more minutes is with another dark reading. Since that low IRE range is the most difficult to get right, I found myself spending more time doing dark readings to keep the results stable than actually getting calibration done. Switched to the trichromat and problem solved (for CRT calibrations).

I sent numerous problem reports to Milori and got only side-stepping responses. When I started hearing about this from other users, I gave up. So keep this in mind while you're taking low readings and see if there is any similarity.

--Bill
post #40 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd View Post

The one issue I continue to struggle with is that I cannot get good readings of the primaries. This prevents me from tweaking my colors because I cannot get an accurate gamut to see where my coords are vs. rec 709.

Others say they use the EyeOne and ColorFacts to do this, so I should be able to do the same. I thought maybe the issue was with my Bravo. So I hooked up a different DVD player via component, changed my color space from HDTV to NTSC, and measured the primaries off of that device. They were coming up incorrectly and just like I saw on the Bravo.

I don't know if this is enough evidence to rule out my source as the problem or not, but based on this it certainly seems that it's less likely. Here I am 3 years later and still struggling with this same issue just on a different pj... Man I really would like to resolve this once and for all.

If anyone has some ideas on things I can try to get accurate primary readings so I can tweak my colors, please let me know. In the meantime if someone can please post the exact changes they've made to color/RCP controls to dial in the colors I'd greatly appreciate it.

I don't think I'd ever use a DVD player to calibrate a projector, only to check and normalize a DVD player to a calibrated projector. Why are you doing it this way?

I've always used Colorfacts on my HTPC or my Sony portable to generate the signals used by the projector, and then read by Colorfacts. Primaries readings work just fine that way. You don't even need to use the same sweep rate if your computer can't generate your target rate.

Using Colorfacts as your signal source also gives you stability and reproducible results independent of anything external to the projector.

--Bill
post #41 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by bblue View Post

I think you have been bitten by the 'wandering' eye-one problem.

Yes, this is problem using this sensor to read emmissively (pointed at the screen). The eye-one pro now comes with a cosign corrector that allows one to point it at the lens of the PJ. By mounting the sensor 1.5' from the lens the intensity of light is vastly greater and the eye-one can read with extreme linearity from 100 IRE to 10 IRE (max deviation in x or y = .0007 from my measurements). This was reading a PJ at 2.2 gamma.

It still needs dark level readings every 10 mins. to maintain that accuracy.

Glenn
post #42 of 615
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bblue View Post

I think you have been bitten by the 'wandering' eye-one problem.

I have both the eye-one and a trichromat sensor with Colorfacts 6 Pro. After putting up with the behavior of the eye-one for months, I retired it. Perhaps it's just this one, but I don't think so. The behavior is this: Within less than ten minutes of a Dark Reading, the low IRE readings (below 40) of the eye-one would start drifting. Do a read at 30 IRE, then do the same one again and get an entirely different result. It gets more extreme as the IRE level you're trying to read gets lower, and it affects red readings the most. The only way to reset it for 5-10 more minutes is with another dark reading. Since that low IRE range is the most difficult to get right, I found myself spending more time doing dark readings to keep the results stable than actually getting calibration done. Switched to the trichromat and problem solved (for CRT calibrations).

I sent numerous problem reports to Milori and got only side-stepping responses. When I started hearing about this from other users, I gave up. So keep this in mind while you're taking low readings and see if there is any similarity.

--Bill

Thanks guys for the details about the EyeOne and trichromat. Have you tried the trichromat with the Ruby and compared it to the EyeOne at higher levels? I ask because earlier in this thread there is talk about perhaps trichromat sensors potentially having issue with SXRD technology. I'm curious if you've done any A/B tests between the meters to verify the trichromat is ok on SXRD.

I have the option of getting the Spyder 2 trichromat meter for $200. Do you think that would do the trick or perhaps its not worth it? I have to figure that at 20 IRE things look very similar to 30 IRE so perhaps going off of 30 IRE is good enough for the low measurement?

Also there is some sort of Train Meter option that I think allows you to get the best of both worlds between the EyeOne and trichromat. Have you guys tried this and if so how is it done?
post #43 of 615
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenned View Post

Yes, this is problem using this sensor to read emmissively (pointed at the screen). The eye-one pro now comes with a cosign corrector that allows one to point it at the lens of the PJ. By mounting the sensor 1.5' from the lens the intensity of light is vastly greater and the eye-one can read with extreme linearity from 100 IRE to 10 IRE (max deviation in x or y = .0007 from my measurements). This was reading a PJ at 2.2 gamma.

It still needs dark level readings every 10 mins. to maintain that accuracy.

Glenn

My pj is ceiling mounted so it would be terribly difficult to take measurements 1.5" from the lens without taking the unit down (which starts to become too much of a PITA with the mount and all).
post #44 of 615
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bblue View Post

I don't think I'd ever use a DVD player to calibrate a projector, only to check and normalize a DVD player to a calibrated projector. Why are you doing it this way?

I've always used Colorfacts on my HTPC or my Sony portable to generate the signals used by the projector, and then read by Colorfacts. Primaries readings work just fine that way. You don't even need to use the same sweep rate if your computer can't generate your target rate.

Using Colorfacts as your signal source also gives you stability and reproducible results independent of anything external to the projector.

--Bill

Does your portable do DVI output nativetly?

Yes it looks like for $125 or so I can add a GeForce card that will give me 1920x1080 output via DVI. I think that would be better.

Does ColorFacts allow you to take measurements with complete full fields or only the color window (any way to make the color window full screen)?

What do you use for the source of patterns from your HTPC? Just ColorFacts or one of the DVDs (DVE etc)?

When you set up a DVI output with a new graphics card in a PC is everything neutral or do these cards add some sort of gamma or brightness/contrast changes? Also how do you then account for the fact that you are sending PC level signals via DVI to do a calibration when normally its Video level signals (16-235) for real material?
post #45 of 615
Having EyeOne stability issues ?
Try storing your EyeOne in the refridgerator (in a sealed plastic bag) a few hours before using it. When you see it's much more stable go to the next step and wrap it in double plastic bags filled with crushed ice for longer cal runs.
post #46 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenned View Post

Hi Greg,

....

I had a different experience with the RCP. I was able to target the primaries and secondaries using the RCP. I had to make adjustments in each color's "targeting" (this might not be the exact word used in the Sony menu) and "range" before the hue and saturation controls worked as expected. Even at that, they did not respond in a strictly linear fashion as one would wish. However, I was able to move all six colors to coincide with the rec 709 standards (at least according to an Eye-One Pro spectrophotometer).

I had the same experience as you in setting the colorspace from "Wide" to the "Normal" setting. It moved their positions a very small amount in color space, not enough to see movement in their positions in a CIE chart.

I sent the Ruby's HDMI input a 480i YCbCr signal with the Accupel and with an HDMI DVD player. I didn't have an HDMI cable so I used a DVI cable with HDMI adapters on both ends. In both cases, the Ruby saw the signal as RGB and didn't apply color decoding. I saw no way to force the Ruby to do so. So far every PJ I have tried this with has responded the same way when set to Auto (decoding matrix). (The Infocus SP7200 allows one to specify the decoding matrix and this PJ could be forced to properly decode YCbCr over DVI.) I believe your review said that your Ruby accepted YCbCr over HDMI. I wasn't able to make this work. I am returning with a true HDMI cable to try again, but I doubt that it will make a difference. Do you have any suggestions?

Interesting results with the RCP. I tried all of the RCP controls in various combinations (Position, Range, RCP Color, RCP Hue) and could only make small changes to saturation. Moreover if I remember correctly, the RCP Color control, which had a small effect on saturation had a much larger effect on the intensity (brightness) of the specific color. So even when I moved the saturation a little, it screwed up the intensity of the color making it better to the leave the RCP Color control at its default positions. Remember, that this is really a 3-dimensional issue. You have to get the x,y (or u'v') positions of the colors correct, but the intensity of the colors must also be correct at those positions. Ordinarily when you are working with native primaries only, you get the intensity correct when you set the grayscale to D65. But with these color management systems you usually have to adjust the intensity of the primary and complementary colors independent of the grayscale adjustment.

Anyway, I don't know why this worked for you in a production unit and not for me in a pre-production unit. The fact that the Wide/Normal mode worked the same for you and me, basically changing only the intensity of the primary colors and not their (x,y) positions, makes it even more mysterious. If Sony had "fixed some problem" (quotes since I don't know how they actually intended it to function) that now allows the saturation to be changed independent of intensity, then why wouldn't they be using that to move the primary chromaticity around in the Wide/Normal function, since that is what you really want and that is the way it works in the Qualia 004?

I'll probably take another look at this entire RCP/Wide/Normal functionality in a production Ruby someday, and then report what I find.

With regard to RGB vs YCbCr formats over DVI/HDMI, I wrote in the review,

"The DVI input only accepts digital RGB signals. There is no user selectable YCbCr mode for the DVI or HDMI inputs, although the HDMI input will accept YCbCr signals automatically when connected to an HDMI source."

So there is no way to use YCbCr digital signals with the Ruby unless you have an HDMI source, which will automatically tell the Ruby that it is sending YCbCr signals. That is a silly limitation of the Ruby. As you mentioned, most projectors allow you to manually select YCbCr or RGB signal processing for the HDMI (and possibly the DVI) input. If you don't have an HDMI source, the Auto mode on all projectors should default to RGB (which is what you have seen). It makes no difference if the cable is DVI (with HDMI adapters) or HDMI. They have the same physical (electrical) signals. It is the HDMI communications protocol that carries the information that tells the projector what type of signal is being sent in the Auto mode.
post #47 of 615
Quote:


My pj is ceiling mounted so it would be terribly difficult to take measurements 1.5" from the lens without taking the unit down (which starts to become too much of a PITA with the mount and all).

For around $20 you can buy camera light tripods on Ebay that can reach up to about 100" or more. It sure makes direct light readings a whole lot easier for ceiling mounted projectors...
post #48 of 615
Bob,

Does your Ruby have good convergence?
post #49 of 615
Convergence is almost perfect in the center, and 2 of the four corners are within 1/2 pixel, and the other 2 corners are within 1 pixel. Though not perfect, it is good enough for me.
post #50 of 615
Good for you, Bob.

Steve, what did you end up doing with yours? Did you get another one, or are your images visibly good enough that you are ok with keeping it?
post #51 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenned View Post

Yes, this is problem using this sensor to read emmissively (pointed at the screen). The eye-one pro now comes with a cosign corrector that allows one to point it at the lens of the PJ. By mounting the sensor 1.5' from the lens the intensity of light is vastly greater and the eye-one can read with extreme linearity from 100 IRE to 10 IRE (max deviation in x or y = .0007 from my measurements). This was reading a PJ at 2.2 gamma.

It still needs dark level readings every 10 mins. to maintain that accuracy.

Glenn

This sounds good. Pointing the lens instead of the screen can solve the inaccurate luminance measurement by EyeOne. Now it is more accurate to measure on/off contrast and gamma. Has it included the pointing device which can let the user know where the sensor is pointing. My old Eyeone sensor doesn't have a cosign corrector nor pointing device.

Have you compared the gamma between pointing to a screen and lens?
post #52 of 615
Thread Starter 
Does the RCP or some other function in the Ruby enable you to adjust the lightness of each color?
post #53 of 615
Here's what the service manual says about white balance adjustments.

--Bill

White Balance
post #54 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyR View Post

Having EyeOne stability issues ?
Try storing your EyeOne in the refridgerator (in a sealed plastic bag) a few hours before using it. When you see it's much more stable go to the next step and wrap it in double plastic bags filled with crushed ice for longer cal runs.

Been there on both counts. But at least on mine, it is only a minimal improvement (meaning short term).

And every ten minute dark readings? I think not.

Sure hope the Milori branded Trichromat works adequately for this PJ.

--Bill
post #55 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd View Post

Does your portable do DVI output nativetly?

No, but the HTPC does. But the color tracking adjustments are global, not per-input so as long as you have the colorspace correct (1-255 or 16-235) the net results should be the same.

Quote:


Does ColorFacts allow you to take measurements with complete full fields or only the color window (any way to make the color window full screen)?

Your choice.

Quote:


What do you use for the source of patterns from your HTPC? Just ColorFacts or one of the DVDs (DVE etc)?

everything needed to do complete calibrations is generated by Colorfacts.

Quote:


When you set up a DVI output with a new graphics card in a PC is everything neutral or do these cards add some sort of gamma or brightness/contrast changes? Also how do you then account for the fact that you are sending PC level signals via DVI to do a calibration when normally its Video level signals (16-235) for real material?

Most popular and decent cards (Matrox, NVidia, ATI) with late drivers will default without any optimizations, gamma curves, or other things like that.

The colorspace used is determined by the type of signal you have defined for a given input. Normally, the auto mode for each input will figure out what's feeding it and adjust accordingly. It's pretty easy to notice if colorspace is wrong.

--Bill
post #56 of 615
I'm new to this forum and to front projectors in general. Iwill be purchasing a vpl-vw100 in the next few days. With all this talk about different calibration settings does anyone have a reccomendation on a qualified person in the Chicago area to initialy calibrate my projector until I can learn more and be able to adjust on my own?
post #57 of 615
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenned View Post

Yes, this is problem using this sensor to read emmissively (pointed at the screen). The eye-one pro now comes with a cosign corrector that allows one to point it at the lens of the PJ. By mounting the sensor 1.5' from the lens the intensity of light is vastly greater and the eye-one can read with extreme linearity from 100 IRE to 10 IRE (max deviation in x or y = .0007 from my measurements). This was reading a PJ at 2.2 gamma.

It still needs dark level readings every 10 mins. to maintain that accuracy.

Glenn

I have the eye one. I have noticed it's poor dark level performance and the required dark reading repeats. Do you need a new eye one in order to get the cosign corrector? or is it software related?
I have been using my older Philips analyzer to check the lower end of the spectrum. It probably needs to be recalibrated though. $800. It is way more sensitive at dark levels than the eye one.
post #58 of 615
I've posted this elsewhere, but just so that we can gather important calibration information into a single thread, here is a great source of HD test patterns, all in .ts format, free for the downloading from one of our very generous members, dr1394:

http://www.w6rz.net/

If you want the entire package of files (highly recommended ), just download the single "all patterns" zip file at the top of the page.
post #59 of 615
moehawk, isn't this truly ridicules, this whole thing.
i have my ticket to denver, but could someone tell me which foot paths to follow and how many months it'll take to walk? oh, this guy is a mountain man( calibrator) and he knows some really good short cuts. if you are lucky he will tell you how to get there two days sooner.

the next generation of $10,000 display machines have got to do all of this automatic. this needs to become a mantra
post #60 of 615
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bblue View Post

...The colorspace used is determined by the type of signal you have defined for a given input. Normally, the auto mode for each input will figure out what's feeding it and adjust accordingly. It's pretty easy to notice if colorspace is wrong.
--Bill

What does ColorFacts use in its pattern, 16-235 or 0-255? Does it matter which as long as the input type is selected correctly? In other words if it outputs 0-255 and I have the Ruby set to PC DVI input (I assume you can set this manually on the Ruby, haven't looked) and calibrate this way, is it then calibrated correctly when you send in 16-235? You say its easy to notice if the colorpsace is worng - how? What is a good way to tell?
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