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Auralex Subdude Owners Thread - Page 37

post #1081 of 1311
Bill, what do you mean a properly designed and constructed sub box does not vibrate withing the subwoofer frequency passband? / < 400hz.? I'm not trying to be confrontational, just trying to ensure I understand what you are communicating?

My personal experience with subwoofers dictates that every single subwoofer I've ever been exposed to, measured, or felt, vibrates the cabinet when playing --- IE - you put your hand on the outside of the sub box, you are going to know the sub is at work --- with the sole exception of dual opposed design. Horns do, bandpass do, even typical sealed subwoofer cabs do. By no means do I think the dual opposed design is the only proper subwoofer design - it is a good one, but just one of many 'proper' designs. I'm sure you understand this as well, so that's why I ask for the clarification on your statement.

While I agree with you that the subwoofer FR should not be changed by placing the sub on a isolation pad - if the cab's vibration is causing the floor, cabinets, shelves etc, in a home to vibrate at audible levels, then the isolation pad may have some function in helping to dampen those physical vibrations throughout the house. I do agree the isolation pad will do nothing to dampen or modify acoustic energy being dispersed by the subwoofer driver - it will only dampen the energy transferred directly from the sub cabinet to the wooden floor. I will say that transfer/vibration can be quite noticeable on a suspended wooden floor verses a basement with the same subwoofer. I've heard my caps in multiple rooms, and on a suspended wooden floor they are all the more tactile than on a concrete slab.

I popped into this thread to see what people thought about placing an isolation pad on top of a subwoofer to help eliminate physical vibration transmitting to a speaker sitting atop the subwoofer. In the case of my JTR ported Captivators they vibrate fiercely when given some power. The cab doesn't make a poorly built or improperly braced vibration noise, it is as sturdy a cabinet as I've ever been in contact with, but just the fact that an 18" high excursion driver is pumping back and forth makes vibrations physically shake the sub box. I'm on a concrete basement slab so I'm not worried about transmitting vibration down, but not sure if the vibration in the cab would affect speakers frequency response or sound characteristic if I set my speakers directly atop the subs. I understand that optimal placement might not be with the drivers for sub and mains in the same vertical plane - but I have measuring equipment with the omnimic and if it measure too poorly I'll buy L and R speaker stands. The reason this question has come up for me is that I typically have used tower speakers, but have recently been playing with eD and JTR high efficiency speakers which either need a stand, or to sit atop the subs to get to the proper listening height. At current I've just been setting them atop the subs with cheap foam spacer disks from home depot.
post #1082 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaea View Post

Bill, what do you mean a properly designed and constructed sub box does not vibrate withing the subwoofer frequency passband? / < 400hz.?
In the most basic terms, one that passes the knuckle test. When you rap a sub, or any speaker, with your knuckles it should make a high pitched knock sound, which indicates a panel resonance in the midrange or higher. If it makes a low pitched hollow sound the panel resonance is in the midbass or lower, indicating insufficient panel thickness and/or insufficient bracing.
Quote:
In the case of my JTR ported Captivators they vibrate fiercely when given some power.
Should have gotten horns. cool.gif
I assume the captivators are well made, so the panels aren't vibrating, but rather the entire box is moving in opposite reaction to the movement of the cones, Newton's Third Law of Motion at work. That's something that spikes can help with, by increasing the inertial resistance to that motion by more firmly grabbing into carpet. But you have to have carpet for them to work. Other methods of dealing with those forces include dual opposed drivers, which cancel out each others lateral vector forces, and horn loaded subs, which are so much more efficient than direct radiators that for a given output vector forces are far less.
Quote:
I popped into this thread to see what people thought about placing an isolation pad on top of a subwoofer to help eliminate physical vibration transmitting to a speaker sitting atop the subwoofer.
If the main vibrates atop the sub it should be isolated, though rubber feet or a resilient pad as thin as 1/8 inch is usually adequate. But the over riding reason not to put them there is that very rarely do subs and mains both work best within the same vertical footprint.
post #1083 of 1311
Interesting, I never heard of that. I just so happened to have my Omnimic out doing some measurements on amplifiers.

Using the real time spectrum analyzer of the Omnimic I did the knuckle test on my two Captivator cabinets. Mic placed at MLP. ~700-800hz peaks (most about 770hz from what I can tell) are what continually occurred during multiple tests on both cabinets with the RTA adjusted to slow and watching real time on the projector screen.

Interesting test...

So in regards to what these guys are talking about - the convo still feels a bit apples and oranges. IE Using my caps as an example - my caps aren't introducing rattle or bad noises in cab design that one might hope to remove with an isolation pad, but they could be introducing shake, feel, rattle noise from other things in the house that someone might want to eliminate in certain rooms or setups (assuming a wooden floor). I don't have any direct experience with a/b of isolation pads, but I can imagine a thick piece of spongy foam could dampen the physical vibrations transmitted directly to a suspended wooden floor in contact with on of my captivator cabinets. I'm fairly sure I could slosh water out of a glass sitting on the captivator cabinet with some high spl dubstep or WOTW where the same glass of water sitting in my seat would only ripple on acoustic energy alone. I think this same thought train would apply to the guys saying they stopped hearing their dishes rattle as much, or windows panes stopped rattling after adopting an isolation pad. It doesn't explain "tighter" bass however. wink.gif


as to horns --- tongue.gif
I'm am perfectly happy with the Captivator's bass reflex design and having compared them directly to a couple different horns - a pair of Orbit Shifters in my room and a pair of F20's in HuskerOmaha's room --- I don't feel I'm missing anything in the SQ dept. Yes, the Orbit Shifters go to ludicrous volumes, but my Caps suffice for me at just ridiculous volume capability. biggrin.gif


Edited by Archaea - 2/9/13 at 2:40pm
post #1084 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaea View Post

I can imagine a thick piece of spongy foam could dampen the physical vibrations transmitted directly to a suspended wooden floor in contact with on of my captivator cabinets.
Possibly, but there's another factor to consider. Any movement of the cab requires the expenditure of energy. That energy which moves the cab does not produce sound. With a typical efficiency of only 3% to start with you don't want to be wasting energy making the cab dance. Foam may keep the vibrations of a dancing sub from being transferred to the floor, but it won't make the cab move less; in fact, it would allow it to move more. This is where a more rigid coupling to the floor works better.
Quote:
my caps aren't introducing rattle or bad noises in cab design that one might hope to remove with an isolation pad, but they could be introducing shake, feel, rattle noise from other things in the house that someone might want to eliminate in certain rooms or setups (assuming a wooden floor).
Things move about because the acoustic output of the sub causes the walls, floor and ceiling and large objects, like doors and windows, to vibrate. Smaller objects on or attached to those surfaces will then also vibrate. If you want to stop them from rattling either isolate them or secure them. It doesn't matter what the floor is made of, the walls and ceiling and other large surfaces will still vibrate. Even if the floor is soft it doesn't transmit low frequency vibrations to the walls. The maximum deflection of a floor will occur where it's softest, right smack in the middle. The strongest part of the floor, where it will not vibrate, is where it connects to the walls. Try hitting a drum some time, preferably a floor tom. The sound heard when you hit the head in the middle is totally different than that when you hit it near the edge.
post #1085 of 1311
Well, my HT is on hardwood floors in a second floor room. And I noticed that objects in the room stopped rattling as much (windows, doors) when I added Subdudes under my two SVS PB-13s.

However, I haven't drunk Kool-Aid since I was a kid and considering the fact that I have a Macbook loaded with the Beta REW and two new USB microphones, as soon as I get my room in decent order I'll do some A/B testing and find out for sure if my acoustics are improved with use of the Subdude. I'd prefer to have the subs directly on the floor as they are certainly prettier that way. However, I suspect that the room rattles minus the Subdudes are going to show up on the REW curves.
post #1086 of 1311
Quote:


I think I'd need at least 2 layers of that to equal the Subdude. My existing carpet and pad is thicker than that Home Depot stuff, and not as effective. And I can actually SEE that the Subdude works - the vibration causing the picture on my screen to move at times is greatly reduced. That and additional bracing of my projector mount finally stopped the picture from vibrating.

As always, YMMV.
post #1087 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Peer View Post


I think I'd need at least 2 layers of that to equal the Subdude. My existing carpet and pad is thicker than that Home Depot stuff, and not as effective. And I can actually SEE that the Subdude works - the vibration causing the picture on my screen to move at times is greatly reduced. That and additional bracing of my projector mount finally stopped the picture from vibrating.

As always, YMMV.

Craig,

 

As you have seen the (Obvious) benefit so have I. biggrin.gif

 

And I know for a fact they greatly helped in stopping the vibrations in my HT.

 

No more dishes in the kitchen cabinets vibrating and rattling.

Door vibrating etc.

 

They are well worth the little they cost compared to the investment of a high end Home Theater.

 

Terry

post #1088 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Possibly, but there's another factor to consider. Any movement of the cab requires the expenditure of energy. That energy which moves the cab does not produce sound. With a typical efficiency of only 3% to start with you don't want to be wasting energy making the cab dance. Foam may keep the vibrations of a dancing sub from being transferred to the floor, but it won't make the cab move less; in fact, it would allow it to move more. This is where a more rigid coupling to the floor works better.

If the foam allows the cab to move more, does that mean lower SPLs and help explain users' experience in reducing vibrating objects?
post #1089 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhskyTangoFoxtrt View Post

If the foam allows the cab to move more, does that mean lower SPLs and help explain users' experience in reducing vibrating objects?
I suppose that's not impossible. But I doubt it. As is the case with claimed differences in the sound with everything from different cables to Magic Pebbles testimonials are never backed up by any real evidence. It's kind of like watching episodes of Ghost Hunters. If something really is happening it can be measured and identified. When I see those measured results and I can duplicate them I'll believe. But not before.
post #1090 of 1311
Quote:
This is where a more rigid coupling to the floor works better.

The metal spike feet on my L & R mains tended to send vibrations into my subfloor. My theater is in a bonus room built over a 2 car garage. My down firing cylinder sub did the same.

Anyway, the Subdudes look nice, and all 3 cost about what my projector mount cost ( and a tiny fraction of the cost of the projector itself ), so in the scheme of things, they are working for me in my setup.
post #1091 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Peer View Post


The metal spike feet on my L & R mains tended to send vibrations into my subfloor. My theater is in a bonus room built over a 2 car garage. My down firing cylinder sub did the same.

Anyway, the Subdudes look nice, and all 3 cost about what my projector mount cost ( and a tiny fraction of the cost of the projector itself ), so in the scheme of things, they are working for me in my setup.

Craig,

 

Makes perfect sense to me what you say.

 

My HT is the same way as I think yours is.

 

It is actually what is referred to as the Bonus room over the 2 1/2 car garage below.

 

Of course the room itself has been changed into the custom HT it is now.

 

And like you the floor is wood over the garage so the Auralex Pads in both our situations do what they are intended to.

 

Cost honestly is so little I cannot imagine all the on going conversation over their cost.

 

And I can't really get a grip on the fellow here that owns an Audio/Video Store and just completely dislikes the Auralex products.

Because he cannot (Scientifically) prove they are of any (Benefit).

 

Honestly if I was a customer and the A/V Dealer I was working with had that same attitude and I wanted to use those Auralex Pads.

I would not get into some lengthy discussion I would simply go and do Business where the A/V Dealer would be more (Flexible) and provide me with what I (Request).

If he or she believed in that product or not.

To me that is foolish and chasing away a customer because the owner does not believe in the product.

 

I should mention I was in Sales for way over Plus 20-Years and I can tell you I (Listened) to my customers.

If they wanted something I kept my (Personal-Opinions) to myself once I heard what they wanted.

Especially if they did not ask me my opinion.

Or if they did ask my (Opinion) and I stated it I still would tell them this.

(If that is your preference I would be tickled to get that for you and also if you like get it installed)

 

Terry


Edited by tigerhonaker - 2/12/13 at 1:25pm
post #1092 of 1311
A question for the gurus here . . .

My HT system is in the basement of my home. The flooring is carpet, with underlay, over concrete. Any point in using a GRAMMA or Subdude under my subwoofer? There is a gas firepace in the same room and it rattles quite a bit when the sub is really working. Just wondering if a GRAMMA or Subdude (or similar DIY solution) might help this.
post #1093 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by tboe77 View Post

A question for the gurus here . . .

My HT system is in the basement of my home. The flooring is carpet, with underlay, over concrete. Any point in using a GRAMMA or Subdude under my subwoofer?
None. No sub is going to cause a concrete floor to vibrate.
Quote:
There is a gas firepace in the same room and it rattles quite a bit when the sub is really working. Just wondering if a GRAMMA or Subdude (or similar DIY solution) might help this.
The only thing that might work is to find which parts are vibrating and somehow tighten them up. The best way to find the rattling parts is to download a sine wave generator program to your PC (google it, there are a few and they're free), play it through the system and sweep the frequency until the rattling begins. There very well could be more than one resonant frequency.
post #1094 of 1311
Thanks very much for the advice!
post #1095 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

It's a half inch. Matching the properties of the subdud isn't the concern, it's doing the same job, and it will. The subdud isn't made that thick because it needs to be, it's made that thick to convince potential buyers that it's capable of doing what it claims to.

While I absolutely agree with you from the acoustics point of view, I bought a Great Gramma for my sub and two Subdudes for my fronts exactly because they lift the speakers 2.5-3" off the floor and protect them from the vicious attacks of my Roomba.
post #1096 of 1311
hello... any fellow users of velodyne impact 12?

Which did you end up getting? Subdude or gramma?

velodyne WxD is 15" x 18"
post #1097 of 1311
There's a thick, dense rubber door mat at Lowe's for $20 that I'm going to use to start with. It's probably 1/2" thick and doesn't compress with just a poke. I guess I'd compare it with one of the thick grease resistant mats found in a restaurant kitchen. It's 24" x 36" with an intricate "wrought iron" design. I'd rather have something more plain but it'll do. I have an anti-fatigue mat in the kitchen that I was going to use but it seems too squishy for a 150 lb. sub, hence the solid rubber mat I looked into.
post #1098 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerhonaker View Post

And I can't really get a grip on the fellow here that owns an Audio/Video Store and just completely dislikes the Auralex products.
Because he cannot (Scientifically) prove they are of any (Benefit).

Honestly if I was a customer and the A/V Dealer I was working with had that same attitude and I wanted to use those Auralex Pads.
I would not get into some lengthy discussion I would simply go and do Business where the A/V Dealer would be more (Flexible) and provide me with what I (Request).
If he or she believed in that product or not.
To me that is foolish and chasing away a customer because the owner does not believe in the product.

I should mention I was in Sales for way over Plus 20-Years and I can tell you I (Listened) to my customers.
If they wanted something I kept my (Personal-Opinions) to myself once I heard what they wanted.
Especially if they did not ask me my opinion.
Or if they did ask my (Opinion) and I stated it I still would tell them this.
(If that is your preference I would be tickled to get that for you and also if you like get it installed)

Terry
For me, I would rather be told bluntly by a salesman that there was no empirically tested evidence that what I was asking for was worth the money, therefore I should save it and spend it on something more worthwhile, even if it means he loses a sale in the process. The above smacks of a slightly unscrupulous 'Yes man' attitiude IMHO, along the same lines as those who feel no guilt selling £1000/ft audio cables to 'audiophiles' that operate exactly the same as $0.50 cable from the local hardware store wink.gif

I can't say I wouldn't be tempted along the same lines, thinking about my own benefit, but on a moral basis I would not want to sell in such a manner smile.gif
post #1099 of 1311
Quote:
And I can't really get a grip on the fellow here that owns an Audio/Video Store and just completely dislikes the Auralex products.

Because he cannot (Scientifically) prove they are of any (Benefit).
There's a word that describes that behavior: Integrity. Another term describes someone who'll sell you anything, whether he believes in it or not: Greedy.
post #1100 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by MemX View Post


For me, I would rather be told bluntly by a salesman that there was no empirically tested evidence that what I was asking for was worth the money, therefore I should save it and spend it on something more worthwhile, even if it means he loses a sale in the process. The above smacks of a slightly unscrupulous 'Yes man' attitude IMHO, along the same lines as those who feel no guilt selling £1000/ft audio cables to 'audiophiles' that operate exactly the same as $0.50 cable from the local hardware store wink.gif

I can't say I wouldn't be tempted along the same lines, thinking about my own benefit, but on a moral basis I would not want to sell in such a manner smile.gif

MemX,

 

Let me just say this and after that I'm not going to do a go back and forth never ending discussion on this.

 

If you don't think the product is any good then don't purchase it.

 

It's no more complicated than that.

 

In my case I like the product and I also feel like it has worked nicely in my specific application.

 

As far as (Cost) and the on going debate one can purchase something else that does the same thing.

 

Then those people should do what they wish and more power to them.

 

If I had the same exact decision to make again I would make the same decision as I did the first time.

 

The rest of what I did a a salesman I am not even going to go there at all.

 

That would be at this point in time a {Total} waste of my time and your's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post


There's a word that describes that behavior: Integrity. Another term describes someone who'll sell you anything, whether he believes in it or not: Greedy.

Bill,

 

I think we have already been over this more than a few times here on this site.

 

So here goes one more time .......

 

You don't like the product then do as you wish.

 

By the same manner me and the rest of the public will do as we wish.

 

Let this drop as we both know it is a silly debate as neither of us is going to change the other person's mind.

 

I Really-Really LUV the Auralex Products I have and I {Highly} recommend them to anyone else !!!

post #1101 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerhonaker View Post

Let this drop as we both know it is a silly debate as neither of us is going to change the other person's mind.
I have no interest in changing your mind, only in giving accurate facts to those considering wasting money on these things, when other far less expensive products will deliver exactly the same result. That, and noting that what they claim to do they don't do. If they did they'd have the data to prove it, prominently displayed.
post #1102 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

I have no interest in changing your mind, only in giving accurate facts to those considering wasting money on these things, when other far less expensive products will deliver exactly the same result. That, and noting that what they claim to do they don't do. If they did they'd have the data to prove it, prominently displayed.

I have the data to support my assertion that my Great Gramma is saving my Rythmik from my Roomba...
post #1103 of 1311
I thought I would throw in my experience with Auralex:

When my audio/visual tech suggested I get a Sub-Dude for my (at the time) Sunfire True Subwoofer (the original from the 1990s) I was skeptical.

The tech offered to let me try a Sub-Dude and return it with no charge if I wanted to. I decided to give it a go.

Although I do not recall it having any effect on "rattling" of anything in the house, what it DID do was to clean up the bass on music. I was surprised and pleased. I had not realized how much "muddiness" there had been in the music before. I bought it.

Last year I upgraded to a JL Audio Fathom f113. That 100+ pound monster crushed the Sub-Dude shortly after install. The Sub-Dude was not made to hold that kind of weight.

So, I replaced the Sub-Dude with one of the GRAMMA products.

The Fathom produces much cleaner bass than the Sunfire, so the improvement with it was not nearly as great as it had been with the Sunfire, but it was still perceptible.

So, my opinion, based on my ears and experience (not any scientific analysis) is that the Auralex products for a subwoofer work.

Oh, for those interested, with the install of the Fathom I had a picture which would not stay on the wall and I had to install some pads on the foyer closet door because the rattling was substantial. In my house the Auralex products did not seem to effect rattling but definitely "cleaned up" the bass on music. I did not bother to test what effect the products may have had on movies.

Cheers,
Tom
post #1104 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elegant View Post

I thought I would throw in my experience with Auralex:

When my audio/visual tech suggested I get a Sub-Dude for my (at the time) Sunfire True Subwoofer (the original from the 1990s) I was skeptical.

The tech offered to let me try a Sub-Dude and return it with no charge if I wanted to. I decided to give it a go.

Although I do not recall it having any effect on "rattling" of anything in the house, what it DID do was to clean up the bass on music. I was surprised and pleased. I had not realized how much "muddiness" there had been in the music before. I bought it.

Last year I upgraded to a JL Audio Fathom f113. That 100+ pound monster crushed the Sub-Dude shortly after install. The Sub-Dude was not made to hold that kind of weight.

So, I replaced the Sub-Dude with one of the GRAMMA products.

The Fathom produces much cleaner bass than the Sunfire, so the improvement with it was not nearly as great as it had been with the Sunfire, but it was still perceptible.

So, my opinion, based on my ears and experience (not any scientific analysis) is that the Auralex products for a subwoofer work.

Oh, for those interested, with the install of the Fathom I had a picture which would not stay on the wall and I had to install some pads on the foyer closet door because the rattling was substantial. In my house the Auralex products did not seem to effect rattling but definitely "cleaned up" the bass on music. I did not bother to test what effect the products may have had on movies.

Cheers,
Tom
Tom,
 
In my case my H/T is directly above my 2 1/2 car garage so the Auralex did help with me (Rattling) dishes in the kitchen.
I think it depends on what is under the floor.
Like some people I have read about that have their Homes on Concrete Slabs.
No expert here but I can see from a {Common Sense} standpoint I would see more difference than the guy on the concrete slab.
 
Terry
post #1105 of 1311
Ive got hardwood floors throughout the house with a crawlspace under the whole thing so you can really hear footsteps and other low frequency noises pretty easily no matter what part of the house you're in. My (DIY) subdude soaks up the transfer of vibration throughout the house enough to make a substantial difference. It's not going to work miracles when cranking it up but it still helps. And it makes a substantial difference at low to mid volume, enough to allow me to listen without turning the sub down and without waking up my roomate. 1000% worth it. I highly doubt an Auralex is going to work better than my homemade one, not the way I made mine. But without reading the above debate, I'll say that whoever thinks a Subdude or DIY equivalent doesn't do anything, in ANY environment, is ignoring physics.
Edited by gts007 - 9/6/13 at 10:02pm
post #1106 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by tboe77 View Post

A question for the gurus here . . .

My HT system is in the basement of my home. The flooring is carpet, with underlay, over concrete. Any point in using a GRAMMA or Subdude under my subwoofer?

No. You are going to find people who swear by them but the technical story is actually common sense - most of the vibration that is transferred to the walls, floor and ceiling from the sub is transferred via the air.

No crap, subwoofers are designed to transfer energy to the air and that is what they do best!

As a rule the enclosure for the sub masses far greater than the cone of the subwoofer driver, and that is a very substantial damper on mechanical vibration from that source.
Quote:
There is a gas fireplace in the same room and it rattles quite a bit when the sub is really working.

That is a problem that you are going to have to address the hard way - by working on its loose parts or somehow isolating it from the room.
Quote:
Just wondering if a GRAMMA or Subdude (or similar DIY solution) might help this.

They will work on your money, but your problem not so much.
post #1107 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by gts007 View Post

Ive got hardwood floors throughout the house with a crawlspace under the whole thing so you can really hear footsteps and other low frequency noises pretty easily no matter what part of the house you're in. My (DIY) subdude soaks up the transfer of vibration throughout the house enough to make a substantial difference. It's not going to work miracles when cranking it up but it still helps. And it makes a substantial difference at low to mid volume, enough to allow me to listen without turning the sub down and without waking up my roomate. 1000% worth it. I highly doubt an Auralex is going to work better than my homemade one, not the way I made mine. But without reading the above debate, I'll say that whoever thinks a Subdude or DIY equivalent doesn't do anything, in ANY environment, is ignoring physics.

[quote] I highly doubt an Auralex is going to work better than my homemade one, not the way I made mine.

But without reading the above debate, I'll say that whoever thinks a Subdude or DIY equivalent doesn't do anything, in ANY environment, is ignoring physics.[/quote]

 

I have the Auralex prducts as I am not one that is good at making things.

As you say it makes little difference if you make yourself one or purchase it.

They do make a difference and that is a fact.

 

Terry

post #1108 of 1311
Quote:
Originally Posted by gts007 View Post

I'll say that whoever thinks a Subdude or DIY equivalent doesn't do anything, in ANY environment, is ignoring physics.
That statement would only come from one who himself doesn't understand the physics of sound. But if you have measured proof to back up your hypothesis, by all means post it.
post #1109 of 1311
Yeah Bill, I do have proof, other than the proof of my own experience which you types ignorantly dismiss as you convolute this topic. The proof is this little thing called mass. Open a book sometime and read up on how mass works.

Like I said, I am 1000% percent satisfied with the major improvement that my DIY Subdude gave me, in MY environment. Are you really trying to tell me that it isn't doing anything? Hilarious. Keep it up. It makes for a good laugh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerhonaker View Post


They do make a difference and that is a fact.

Terry

Good; you accept reality. Some people in this thread apparently don't.
Edited by gts007 - 9/9/13 at 11:06am
post #1110 of 1311

I do-not really understand why some people that don't like a given product have to beat it to death with those that do like it.

 

The Auralex products discussed here are excellent examples of what I am saying above.

 

I completely understand a person not liking a given product and not going to use it or promote it to others.

 

But to be so (Hard-Headed) that they just keep on and on and on and on to those that do like the product makes no sense.

 

If you don't like something then don't get it or use it.

 

If someone ask you (Specifically) what your thoughts are on that product then state them and move on.

 

But to just keep on with some crap about proving to that individual scientifically that it works is just ridiculous.

 

No one has to {Prove} to anyone else why they like or use a given product.

 

They like it and they find that it does work for their given application and that is really all that counts.

 

Beating the cost up on something as inexpensive as the Auralex Products are after a point is a waste of time.

 

It cost to much ???

 

Then as some people have done they have the ingenuity to make their own and like what they made and it works fine for them.

 

Some of us don't have the ability to make that sort of thing so we buy it already made and just install it.

 

It would seem to me that a rational person should be able to except the fact that because they don't like something that does not mean other people want.

 

It would be a pitiful world if everyone of us had exactly the same products and everyone had to agree on what we like and what we want.

 

My Last comment on this post,

Live and let live ........

 

 

Terry

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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Subwoofers, Bass, and Transducers › Auralex Subdude Owners Thread