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Power cord run behind drywall..Legal??  

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Situation: My audio component gear is on an adjacent wall to my Panny plasma tv. I just purchased a Monster power filter/surge protector (3500mkII) that I want to use with the gear AND the tv. The tv power cord is way short to try to reach the adjacent wall, and I must hide all wiring because there is a doorway between the adjacent walls. If I build/buy a long power cord, is it ok to run it upwards inside the drywall on an outside (insulated) wall, over the suspended ceiling, then plug it in at the equipment on the sidewall...about a 24 foot run?

Or, install a new outlet behind the tv to accept the tv cord, but have the other end of the wiring terminated with a plug that could go into the Monster unit? I will be adding new equipment near the tv, but want to power it all to the remotely located Monster unit. I guess I am looking for electrical code advice when I think about it. Is it ok to use regular inwall electrical wiring, hide it behind exterior wall drywall, and a suspended ceiling, to create an outlet at one end and a plug at the other? The Monster device has individual input locations for many devices and I would like to have everything enter it when I am done. My understanding is simply running a loaded power strip into one outlet on the Monster defeats the purpose. Hope I made myself clear!
post #2 of 32
I don't know about your state, but pretty much every insurance company will say that they cannot do anything when you have power cords running behind walls. It's way against code. I would suggest having an electrician come in and put in an outlet. Once again, if there is ever a fire from the cord, your insurance company will NOT cover it as it is against code.
post #3 of 32
Unless you're an insurance adjuster for jgira, you can't be 100% certian what his insurance will and will not cover.

That said...using an electrical cord behind a wall is most definaetly not to code. ;)
post #4 of 32
You take an extension cord off the monster unit and plug to this. Run wall legal romex to outlet for projector. I'm sure there is an indoor version just can't find right now.

http://www.twaathome.com/Catalog/Model_4937.htm
post #5 of 32
My recommendation would be to install another outlet and buy another monster unit.

BIGmoutinDC's solution sounds reasonable and may be code compliant. If you have your mind set on using one monster unit, that is probably the best solution.

My opinion would be that terminating anything with a plug makes it an extension cord (romex, sj, whatever).... and having an extension cord concealed behind drywall is illegal.


Tim
post #6 of 32
OK if you don't like the $19 solution give the idea to a marketing department that borrows a page from the Monster Cable playbook and you've got a $300 version

Acceptable link to follow

OK lets try this

http://shop.store.yahoo.com/inthebox.../maxinpow.html
post #7 of 32
I think it would be cheaper to buy another $110 power filter :)

My personal problems with either solution (the $19 or the $400 version) is that you are using an extension cord to power a permanently installed receptacle. Ok if it is a portable building (eg amusement park etc). A cord is, by definition, for the temporary attachment of a device.

I wonder if you get a UL listed device for $400+ dollars?

I also wonder if there were be a problem with that receptacle when the inlet is not connected to the monster unit. I mean, it looks like a receptacle, but would not be grounded at all.

Really it's just a code question. In reality the $19 or $400 solution would work fine.

Tim
post #8 of 32
I use a set of the Panamax MIW panels and they are not simple outlet boxes. They encorporate, depending on the model/configuration, line filtering, AC surge protection and/or signal line surge protection. And they are UL-approved.

Kal
post #9 of 32
Thread Starter 
Lots of constructive info here... I suspected it was not code to run a power cord in a wall, but it is ok in the interior of a room, obviously. So, how about this: From the Monster device, over the suspended ceiling, then exit into the room and down the wall using some on-wall wiring channels. A bit hoaky, but I have seen some that look mildly attractive and can be painted the wall color. Or, since I am mainly trying to protect my biggest investment..the plasma..... just protect it, and forget about the audio gear. I plan to run 2 receivers anyway and completely separate my audio listening from home theater viewing. There are signal generated power switchers that will direct power to 1 pair of speakers from either of 2 amplifiers...but you guys knew that, I'm sure! :) I can't be the first guy out there with this problem. :)
post #10 of 32
Been through this question before, it seems to pop up all the time. I searched thru some archives and found a thread that I was involved with and I cut out a few snippets...

BasementBob
03-07-04, 10:04 AM
Any wire runing through the wall has to meet code, and have grounded boxes at either end. Outside of the walls one can use normal extension cords.

What you're looking for is an 'inlet'. It's a 3 prong male recepticle instead of the usual female recepticle. Here using a normal female outlet on two sides with a double male custom extension cord is against code, but this inlet on one side is ok.

Ah, here's some
http://www.electricgeneratorsdirect....hp?cPath=21_27

http://www.electricgeneratorsdirect....s/PB15_400.jpg

I'm thinking of having UPSes in my equipment room, and using these to go to the plugs near my subs.
post #11 of 32
Yes running an extension cord through a wall is a code violation and illegal.

Now will running a Plasma off it be unsafe? I don't think so. The Plasma is fused or otherwise internally protected. As long as you don't plug a heater or toster into the cord it should be OK.

Note to flamers: I am an EE! I did say it was a code violation. Now is it safe? I think it is in this application. My projector power cord runs through a layer of drywall to a switched outlet in the theater attic. To code? No it's not but hardly unsafe.
post #12 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickwebb
Been through this question before, it seems to pop up all the time. I searched thru some archives and found a thread that I was involved with and I cut out a few snippets...

BasementBob
03-07-04, 10:04 AM
Any wire runing through the wall has to meet code, and have grounded boxes at either end. Outside of the walls one can use normal extension cords.

What you're looking for is an 'inlet'. It's a 3 prong male recepticle instead of the usual female recepticle. Here using a normal female outlet on two sides with a double male custom extension cord is against code, but this inlet on one side is ok.

Ah, here's some
http://www.electricgeneratorsdirect....hp?cPath=21_27

http://www.electricgeneratorsdirect....s/PB15_400.jpg

I'm thinking of having UPSes in my equipment room, and using these to go to the plugs near my subs.
That's it! I get it...it simply provides a "link" between 2 power cords that have male and female ends...brilliant. By mounting it with standard in-wall 14-2 wire, to an outlet within reach of the plasma, it's all safe and legal. There is no male-male or female-female contrived extension cord......can only work with a standard power cord at each device. I really appreciate the research you did for me ;) I owe you one. Off topic, but if you need online guitar lessons feel free to ask! :D
post #13 of 32
Use one of these on the side buy the monster powers conditioner.

http://www.kussmaul.com/accessories%20index.html
LL
post #14 of 32
If you're not so much concerned with line conditioning but rather want surge protection, and you've got dedicated circuits to your room (or even if not), there's always a NEMA panel box from ZeroSurge (zerosurge.com). They make single and dual module 20 amp surge protectors that protect everyting on a circuit. I'm using them in my room for my 3 20 amp circuits. You don't even need a power bar in your room - just get your electrician to install extra recepticles. And they're cheap, too. The single 20A unit is $200-ish.
post #15 of 32
I just did this and my electrician today gave me the solution. I have a Richard Grey power conditioner in a closet set up on a dedicated 20 amp circut with my components . I needed to run it 20 ft to the projector. He suggested 14 /2 romex (which is legal in New York) to be run thru the dry wall with a plug on each end. Im heading out to home depot tonight. I will probably do the same for my sub if needed.
post #16 of 32
I just did this and my electrician today gave me the solution. I have a Richard Grey power conditioner in a closet set up on a dedicated 20 amp circut with my components . I needed to run it 20 ft to the projector. He suggested 14 /2 romex (which is legal in New York) to be run thru the dry wall with a plug on each end. Im heading out to home depot tonight. I will probably do the same for my sub if needed. Don't use an extension cord!!!!!!
post #17 of 32
scope1:

Quote:
He suggested 14 /2 romex (which is legal in New York) to be run thru the dry wall with a plug on each end.
Won't that break? Round here 14/2 is solid copper, and a few twists, particularly at a wall plate, will snap it off -- assuming it doesn't catch fire first when it's merely mostly broken.
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by scope1
I just did this and my electrician today gave me the solution. I have a Richard Grey power conditioner in a closet set up on a dedicated 20 amp circut with my components . I needed to run it 20 ft to the projector. He suggested 14 /2 romex (which is legal in New York) to be run thru the dry wall with a plug on each end. Im heading out to home depot tonight. I will probably do the same for my sub if needed. Don't use an extension cord!!!!!!
What type of plug on each end and how is the romex terminated in the wall?
post #19 of 32
Patrick,

You should be able to run a what I call a dummy plug.

Standard outlet#1<--->Romex in wall<--->Standard outlet#2 (the outlets are not connectted to the Electrical panel but to themselves

It is the code way of doing an "extention cord" in the wall.

Plasma to standard outlet #1 and a Male/Male electrical cord from outlet 2 to Monster device...

If you need more clarification let me know and I will try to send a pick.

Dean
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustoff
Patrick,

You should be able to run a what I call a dummy plug.

Standard outlet#1<--->Romex in wall<--->Standard outlet#2 (the outlets are not connectted to the Electrical panel but to themselves

It is the code way of doing an "extention cord" in the wall.

Plasma to standard outlet #1 and a Male/Male electrical cord from outlet 2 to Monster device...

If you need more clarification let me know and I will try to send a pick.

Dean
I too would like clarification on that. I think I know what your talking about. Is the "plasma" the TV :rolleyes: :o

I have a recepticle in my ceiling for my projector and was wondering how I could hook it up to my power conditioner without putting a cord in the wall and I think you might have something here.

My stepdad is an electrician and if I can show him your picture we might be able to rewire that recepticle. I can get to the back side of the recepticle that is feeding it.

Thanks,
Rob
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustoff
Patrick,

You should be able to run a what I call a dummy plug.

Standard outlet#1<--->Romex in wall<--->Standard outlet#2 (the outlets are not connectted to the Electrical panel but to themselves

It is the code way of doing an "extention cord" in the wall.

Plasma to standard outlet #1 and a Male/Male electrical cord from outlet 2 to Monster device...

If you need more clarification let me know and I will try to send a pick.

Dean
So, if you happen to have the male end connected to the monster device and the other end isn't plugged in, you have a male end that is live???
post #22 of 32
I am in the process of electrical in my HT. I did some research and was planning on going with a something I saw at Home Depot. I couldn't find it on HD site so I found something similar.

http://www.newark.com/product-detail...alog/9027.html

My plan was to install the outlet next to the projector and run Romex to inside the equipment closet and terminate to the reverse outlet. Then run a custom cable from outlet to Power Conditioner / UPS etc. It should work, I think it meets code (will confirm with electrical inspector) and only cost around $20.

I will try to find a link to the actual receptacles as this link only shows one of the two.

Dave
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickwebb
So, if you happen to have the male end connected to the monster device and the other end isn't plugged in, you have a male end that is live???
Hi Patrickwebb,

This is the exact reason that a wall-mounted "inlet" exists. Basically, the male end of an extension cord mounted in a receptical box. This lets you use a standard extension cord between the "inlet" and the power conditioner.

But you probably already know this, and you question was meant to point out the danger of a male-male cord to the earlier poster... :)

Dwight
post #24 of 32
Best solution is the inlet; code compliance of the inlet is a source of debate, but at least there is some debate.

Male-to-male extension cord is definitely not compliant. More importantly, what happens when little Johnny pulls it out.. or you trip over it and it grounds through your furniture or tv.

Romex is rated for in-wall use, but when you put cord connectors on the end, it is just another extension cord. Furthermore, you don't get the proper strain relief at the connectors because romex isn't round, and the cord connectors aren't designed for it. The idea that an electrician suggested this is disturbing.

Sorry to speak in such candor, but regardless of code, the suggestions simply are not safe.

Tim
post #25 of 32
Wall mount male is certainly the best bet, but...

Strain relief? Not safe? About as bad as saying your Homeowner's Insurance will not pay because there are no gounded outlets in your 100 year old house.
post #26 of 32
I don't see the connection, or your point.

I don't understand how a homeowner performing work (without a permit, as no inspector would ever approve these methods) in a clearly non-compliant manner has any corrolation to a pre-existing condition that met code at the time it was installed.

Don't misunderstand-- I am wholeheartedly in favor of a homeowner being able to perform work on their own house. But anyone installing anything electrical should have a basic understanding of the electrical code.

Furthermore, if you are under the impression that the insurance company puts your bottom line before theirs, I think you are sorely mistaken. The only thing an insurance company loves better than subrogating against a 3rd party to recoup your claim is not paying it at all.

Tim
post #27 of 32
Hey, another way of running power without having a cords going everywhere is to use some surface mount products like Wiremold.. They sell this stuff at your local home improvement store. Depending on your exact room layout, this might a be feasible of doing this without ripping into the walls.
post #28 of 32
Exposed metal that's "hot" is just plain dangerous. At Home Depot they sell an appliance cord. One side is a male plug that you would plug into the Monster product and the other end consists of wiring that you would wirenut to whatever Romex you have running through the walls or surface mount wire channels like Wiremold.
post #29 of 32
Quote:
At Home Depot they sell an appliance cord. One side is a male plug that you would plug into the Monster product and the other end consists of wiring that you would wirenut to whatever Romex you have running through the walls
This is just as illegal, but probably more dangerous, than any of the other "solutions" that have been suggested. You can't just wirenut a connection and stuff it into the wall. Any junctions have to be in proper junction boxes and they have to be accessible (meaning you can't hide a junction box in a wall).

It's amazing to me that people will put so much money into their home theater and then cheap out when it comes to running power to their components. Come on guys, we're talking about a few bucks here to run a proper outlet. Even if you don't know much about electrical codes and such, it's not hard to pick up a book on the subject. Sure it might involve a little bit of drywall patching and touch-up of your paint but wouldn't you rather do it right? We're talking about dedicated home theaters here, how long did it take the average guy on here to build his HT? In a finished room it shouldn't take much more than a day or so to run a proper outlet and finish any drywall repairs. But hey, ultimately it's up to you isn't it? If you want to run extension cords through your ceiling that's your choice, but why oh why do you guys keep coming on here asking is this short-cut or that hack-job legal when it's perfectly obvious to anyone that it's not.

But hey, that's just my opinion...

Mark
post #30 of 32
I too have been trying to find a way to connect my projector to my conditioner. After reading this post I think some of the AVSers are confused. At no point will a male connection be live when bare if you use a standard outlet at the proector and run romex in the wall to a male recepticle. The only time the male is live is when you plug the female end of your power cord into it, at which point it is covered by the power cord sheathing. Hope this helps!

Mark
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