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My DIY backlit screen...

post #1 of 50
Thread Starter 
http://gallery.avsforum.com/showgall...ppuser=7471308

114" x 64.5"Painted directly on wall with Behr Pewter Mug (770E-3). The extra darkness of the Pewter Mug seems to do the trick (enhancing blacks - the main weakness of my SP5000) better than the SilverScreen I was using before.

Anyway, the backlighting is created by framing the screen with crown molding with a 24' rope light tucked behind. The light goes on/off with the receiver.

This is my first projector & screen. What do you think?
post #2 of 50
I think it looks very nice.
post #3 of 50
Look's awesome - nice work!
post #4 of 50
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the kind words!!
post #5 of 50
BAG302 - looks great. What type of ropelight did you use? What color is it and where did you get it?

Did you use any specific hardware to affix the rope light to the back of the trim?

I have some interest in getting some ropelight for the back of my screen as well, and also want a bit more for an outside project I have.

Thanks,

GL
post #6 of 50
Thread Starter 
Gonelong, I just used the clear rope light from Home Depot (24') ~ $15. It actually doesn't cover the entire circumference of the screen, but my a/v cabinet hides the bottom and has a 6" rope light inside - so it appears seamless. You could easily add a 6 footer as they "chain" together like xmas lights.

Also, It doesn't really need any hardware to stay in place - the crown molding holds it well when you wedge it behind. I did put a couple of screws on the bottom section to keep the light from sagging. The whole thing is really quite simple. One of those projects that just came out better than expected.
post #7 of 50
Very nice. Did you look into the EL wiring thing? Just curious whay you went with rope light vs EL is all.
post #8 of 50
Thread Starter 
Thanks Benven, I considered EL, but decided on the rope for a couple of reasons.
1) cost = $15 and I could return it to HD if not satisfied
2) The ropelight provides a warm, soft incandescent glow (especially against the tan walls in my home) that I really like. I've been using it on the plant shelves throughout the house and have been very happy.
3) simplicity: no need for transformers. I have so much wiring to hide that I considered creating a false wall. Simpler is better for me.
post #9 of 50
Thanks! All very good reasons. The transformer thing is also an obstacle for me. Keep up the great work.
post #10 of 50
Looks pretty cool!

Silly question - does it serve some type of purpose, or is it soley for looks? I generally think of light as an enemy of a projector, but maybe coming from behind that is not the case? I imagine it might serve as a visual seprator between the wall and screen. I'm not sure. Help with my confusion!

Thanks,
Jeff
post #11 of 50
Thread Starter 
No, I don't think it enhances or detracts from the picture itself and I chose to do it based on looks only. If anything, the backlight makes the picture a little easier on the eyes and provides nice ambient light without detracting from the picture.

Now that I think about it, I've been backlighting my crt TV's for years, mainly to see the clock on the wall above it.
post #12 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bag302 View Post

Gonelong, I just used the clear rope light from Home Depot (24') ~ $15.

I really like the way yours shows and want to mimic it as closely as possible.

I stopped by HD today. They have quite a selection of rope light. You stated that you used clear, however, the HD I was in has "clear" marked on just about everthing.

Of the two that I am considering, 1 is "clear" with a yellow tint, and one is "clear" plastic. From the picture it appears that you have the yellow tinted "clear" plastic. Is that correct?

I was thinking the yellowish tint would more subtle and that the "clear" white might be too harsh.

I think it just looks nicer, but it seems there is some "science"? behind it as well.

GL

Quote:
http://www.cinemaquestinc.com/ideal_lume.htm
All TVs require a darkened room to present their best picture. The color, point of origin, and intensity of light in a viewing environment, all affect the quality of image obtainable from any television, as well as the viewing fatigue experienced. A small fluorescent fixture, with a proper 'color temperature' bulb, placed behind a direct-view monitor, flat panel TV, or rear-projection set, fulfills much of what is needed to achieve the SMPTE recommendations pertaining to ambient light in the room. Viewing a TV in a darkened room can cause eye strain in short order. This is primarily due to the iris opening and closing dramatically as scenes change from dark to light on the screen. For a vivid demonstration of how frequently light levels change throughout a typical program, turn your back to a TV in a darkened room and notice how much the light changes in the room, both in intensity and frequency. Providing a small amount of light behind the set 'biases' the iris (reducing the range of motion in the iris muscle), resulting in more relaxed viewing. Glare and reflections are then dramatically reduced, by eliminating any light source from striking the front of the set. Colors appear richer and blacks are darker. Contrast and brightness controls can be turned down.
post #13 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonelong View Post

I really like the way yours shows and want to mimic it as closely as possible.

I stopped by HD today. They have quite a selection of rope light. You stated that you used clear, however, the HD I was in has "clear" marked on just about everthing.

Of the two that I am considering, 1 is "clear" with a yellow tint, and one is "clear" plastic. From the picture it appears that you have the yellow tinted "clear" plastic. Is that correct?

I was thinking the yellowish tint would more subtle and that the "clear" white might be too harsh.

I think it just looks nicer, but it seems there is some "science"? behind it as well.

GL

Gonelong, the clear in the clear plastic casing is what I used and it gives a nice soft light. I also use them on my plant shelves. I'm sure iIt helps that my walls are tan as well. With HD's liberal return policy, you could try any of them and return the ones that don't work.
post #14 of 50
Nice look, good job.
post #15 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bag302 View Post

Gonelong, the clear in the clear plastic casing is what I used and it gives a nice soft light. I also use them on my plant shelves. I'm sure iIt helps that my walls are tan as well. With HD's liberal return policy, you could try any of them and return the ones that don't work.

Thanks, my son will be napping in a few minutes and I'll be up to HD to pick some up.

GL
post #16 of 50
After reading this thread, I went to HD to check out this rope lighting for my screen. I purchased the 24 foot rope and went home and went to work.....Fantastic, it looks great. I went one step further...I purchased a Luthron lamp dimmer for $11.00, (also at HD). This really makes a huge difference. You can leave it bright for showing off the screen when your not watching a movie and then dim it to your liking when watching a movie. I have to say, this is a great idea and my hats off to Bag302 for coming up with it. Gene.
post #17 of 50
Bags, thanks a bunch! Nice bang for the buck on this one.

I just finished putting up the rope-light 1/2 hour ago. It looks great and has a very high WAF. It really sets off the screen and it looks great with the projector off, with the projector and lights on, and with the projector on and lights off.

I went with the 24 Ft., clear rope-light which worked well for my 96"-ish screen.

GL
post #18 of 50
Thread Starter 
Glad this is working out for you guys. Now, how about some pics??
post #19 of 50
How did you get them behind our frame? I have not put my frame up yet; but want to know how you're leaving that gap for the rope. Would you post a side shot or your frame with a description of how you did it?

Sorry for so many questions; I'm just getting started in this.
post #20 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mavrick007 View Post

How did you get them behind our frame? I have not put my frame up yet; but want to know how you're leaving that gap for the rope. Would you post a side shot or your frame with a description of how you did it?

Sorry for so many questions; I'm just getting started in this.

I have my screen hung by french cleats, so I have about an inch behind it. The 24' rope light at HD came with 12 guides (I purchased 12 more) that I screwed into the back of my 1x3 pine board border.

GL
post #21 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mavrick007 View Post

How did you get them behind our frame? I have not put my frame up yet; but want to know how you're leaving that gap for the rope. Would you post a side shot or your frame with a description of how you did it?

Sorry for so many questions; I'm just getting started in this.

Sorry I didn't reply sooner, I have house guests and work has been real busy. I'll try to get you some pictures by the end of the week. On my screen, I used crown molding and to create the frame. By tacking the flat edge of the molding to the wall, it automatically leaves enough space behind it to allow the rope light to be tucked in.

I hope this helps for now.
post #22 of 50
Hey no problem; I understand.

Sounds like your setup is similar to what I want to try. I have just finished painting my screen on the wall with Silver Screen and WOP. I'm hope to have the frame up this weekend, and after seeing your results... I would love to mimic it.
post #23 of 50
I finally figured out how to post pictures on this forum....These are pictures of my 110" backlit screen thanks to Bags. http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e2...Theater010.jpg http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e2...Theater009.jpg
post #24 of 50
Thread Starter 
Looking good LoStrings....real good!!
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bag302 View Post

Looking good LoStrings....real good!!

Thanks again, great idea!!!
post #26 of 50
You guys realize this doesn't necessarily help your perception of the projected image, right? (Could make it worse...)

From the above post "...direct-view monitor, flat panel TV, or rear-projection set".

You are all using Front Projection.

Aesthetically it's a nice touch for the room decor, though.
post #27 of 50
I thought the same when I first read the post. However, I can't argue with Bag302's results! His image looks awesome, and the backlight only seems to enhance it.

This may not be the best thing for lower lumens PJs; but if you can get away with it... WOW! It makes all other screens seem cheap in comparison.

If it does affect the image; one could always put it on a dimmer, or simply turn it off during the movie
post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by danieljoelle View Post

You guys realize this doesn't necessarily help your perception of the projected image, right? (Could make it worse...)

In my case it really does seem to increase viewing pleasure. With all the lights out my black trim is pretty much invisable ... but with the backlights on the trim is visible and I think it helps noticably with the contrast. My wife agrees. My neighbor was over tonight, and he agrees as well.

GL
post #29 of 50
If done right back lighting even with front projection should increase percieved contrast and lower the percieved black level quite a bit because it causes the eyes' irises to close a bit more than they normally would during a dark low contrast scene (where they would generally open a bit more, making the blacks appear way too grey)..

To get an idea of what I'm talking about find a low contrast dark scene from a film that screams "DIGITAL!". You should see very grey blacks at full screen. The contrast should appear a bit weak. Then take the image off full screen and it should have a thin bright border around the entire image. Stretch it to almost full screen. You should noticed that the blacks appear quite a bit darker which makes the contrast seem higher, especially since you won't hardly notice any difference on the brighter scenes.
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonelong View Post

Bags, thanks a bunch! Nice bang for the buck on this one.

I just finished putting up the rope-light 1/2 hour ago. It looks great and has a very high WAF. It really sets off the screen and it looks great with the projector off, with the projector and lights on, and with the projector on and lights off.

I went with the 24 Ft., clear rope-light which worked well for my 96"-ish screen.

GL

Could we see some pictures of your screen?
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