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Kaleidescape- how will it handle Bluray and HD DVD with hdcp? - Page 6

post #151 of 835
Right now we already have two major players selling video content over the internet. And there are smaller players involved.

BLockbuster has for years been trying to figure out how to do it. Netflix is also working on it. Disney has some box (that i keep forgetting the name of) that downloads in the background so that you always have movies available to watch. And even for K, that is one of the holy grails that they want to achieve...

So in a market where you have AT LEAST; Apple, Google, Blockbuster, Netflix and likely others already halfway there... how long does it take for them to go the extra step?

I am not sure about the 12-18 month timeframe, although i would guess that is the timeframe right now to realistically get a good BR or HDDVD library available in the stores. But even Bill gates said it, THis will be the last shiny disc format. And if you do not think that MS is not working on an even tougher DRM that would allow them to Distribute HD in the WMV format to your computer... you are nuts.

The big holdup in the internet delivery is the same as the one for the HD discs... the studios have to trust that their content is protected. So when you look at solutions, ask yourself if that solution protects content. K sure does.
post #152 of 835
There is also the cynic in me who wants the studios to pull their thumbs out of their butts and make some content worth stealing. It seems all the movies they can come up with are re-makes of already bad 70s TV shows.
post #153 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzman View Post


The big holdup in the internet delivery is the same as the one for the HD discs... the studios have to trust that their content is protected. So when you look at solutions, ask yourself if that solution protects content. K sure does.

Actually, I think the next generation disc will act as an important bridge between the shinny disc and the internet delivery of high quality HD movie. The success of MC/MMC will pave the way in the trust department. Also downloadable sound track/menu/extras which could seamlessly merge into the next generation disc will greatly help facilitate the infrastructure for the final step.
post #154 of 835
How great would it be to just be able to browse, purchase, and download thousands of HD movies through the Kaleidescape UI! Or even better, stream the movies.

The only problem I see is browsing through thousands of movies just to find something to watch could take a while. My 5 year old can browse the covers for an hour before he makes a desicion. And I have only 600 movies

I would even settle for Non-HD movies for now.
post #155 of 835
Streaming isn't going to happen any time soon unless you want to have your movie stop 3-10 times while watching it to see a screen with an hourglass rotating and the words: Buffering - 5%, 6%, 7%... flashing on your screen.

They could add another menu to browse and it would titles you don't own but can purchase. That would be great.
post #156 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Grant View Post

The result could be a repeat of DVD-A/SACD (though that did take far longer than 12-18 months, and it's still not "dead", just comatose)...

My point exactly. Jesus Christ ,we have been talking about this for more than two years let alone introduction and death in less than 18 months. This will take off and no where nearly as DVD has. In a couple of years more choices will be there and so will HDDVD/BR. After that it might be a toss up.

Art
post #157 of 835
As I've pointed out elsewhere, compare the level of talk about DVD-A/SACD, and the level of talk about HD discs. Unless I just seriously mis-remember, there's hugely more interest in a new major home theater technology than there was in a major new music technology. This makes sense in that there is a far larger interest in the population about big(ger) screen, surround sound home theater than there is about really high quality music. So I think that it's just not an apples and oranges comparison myself.
post #158 of 835
Quote:


Jesus Christ ,we have been talking about this for more than two years let alone introduction and death in less than 18 months.

I think he'd agree on this one!

The whole format war is just hilarious. It's been a few years at least, waiting for HD content, I mean the LEAST we could be is optimistic enough to hope it takes half that long to die off?

post #159 of 835
Dean, your point is fair, there are material ways where this differs from DVD-A/SACD. However, the thought of having to buy two players just to cover the movies one might wish to collect in HD has got to be daunting to many J6Pers. If this format war doesn't end soon I really do think both formats are in trouble.
post #160 of 835
Steaming is neat, but as Poindexter points out, not practical for high quality playback. but as a delivery method...
post #161 of 835
Steaming indeed.

Quote:


If this format war doesn't end soon I really do think both formats are in trouble.

You're probably right. Unfortunately...
post #162 of 835
I think if it does take off, it'll take off real slooowwwww. Average folk don't really know much of HD-DVD or BR, only that something is supposedly coming, and I don't see the mass public embrassing HD-DVD/BR the way they did DVD, especially if told they'll need a new display with HDCP in order to really take advantage of the content. Some users, people like my parents, who own 2 HD sets, neither of which have an HDCP port available, won't see the point in spending $500-$1000 on a new "DVD" (they will call it DVD no matter how it's marketed, that's just how my folks are) player that won't even "play properly" on their two TV's.

Down rezzing though makes me hope that the formats fail miserably, and go the way of Divx, then again... the thought of something like Lord of the Rings in HD just makes me giddy. Who knows, maybe it'll go down like the DVD-R/+R format war, where most people couldn't tell you the difference between the two formats, or that there really are 2 seperate formats.

Streaming could happen though, especially if they use MPEG4 for the compression, but it would have to be in a simple system that the average user can understand. I've streamed a couple SD movies recently via Media Center, and I have to say I was impressed with the quality, and how smoothly things went. Picture on my 37" LCD was not nearly as bad as I expected it to be, but I wouldn't have called it DVD quality either. The problem with streaming, or owning electronic versions only, is that I'm the type of consumer that ultimately likes to have the physical product to own. It's the pack rat in me, but I don't like the idea of not having a hard copy of something that I paid for, even if I'm 99% certain that the electronic copy I purchased will be available to me 24/7.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Roddey View Post

As I've pointed out elsewhere, compare the level of talk about DVD-A/SACD, and the level of talk about HD discs. Unless I just seriously mis-remember, there's hugely more interest in a new major home theater technology than there was in a major new music technology. This makes sense in that there is a far larger interest in the population about big(ger) screen, surround sound home theater than there is about really high quality music. So I think that it's just not an apples and oranges comparison myself.

But could that be attributed to how people's listening habits have changed when it comes to music? As someone who listens to very little music outside of the car, or with something other than headphones, I could careless about multi channel music, or music sampled at a high rate. But as someone that loves to watch movies, I'm slightly more interested in how those movies can be delivered to me, and the quality in which they are delivered.
post #163 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mntneer View Post

I think if it does take off, it'll take off real slooowwwww. Average folk don't really know much of HD-DVD or BR, only that something is supposedly coming, and I don't see the mass public embrassing HD-DVD/BR the way they did DVD, especially if told they'll need a new display with HDCP in order to really take advantage of the content. Some users, people like my parents, who own 2 HD sets, neither of which have an HDCP port available, won't see the point in spending $500-$1000 on a new "DVD" (they will call it DVD no matter how it's marketed, that's just how my folks are) player that won't even "play properly" on their two TV's.

That makes me chuckle. My parents are the same way, but my mom can't always spot an HD image when it's being played. If pointed out to her, she'll agree that it looks good, but she won't exactly notice the difference right away like I can. Of course, my mom's not big into TV. My dad has started to embrace HD more but he's easily annoyed by HD channels that don't show everything they broadcast in HD. I can't really blame him but hopefully that will change with time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mntneer View Post

Down rezzing though makes me hope that the formats fail miserably, and go the way of Divx, then again... the thought of something like Lord of the Rings in HD just makes me giddy. Who knows, maybe it'll go down like the DVD-R/+R format war, where most people couldn't tell you the difference between the two formats, or that there really are 2 seperate formats.

I don't think they both will fail like Divx did, but there's certainly a good possibility that one will fall by the wayside. I don't think this market is anything like audio where SACD and DVD-A haven't really killed the other off. I think there is interest and a market for HD disc content by the masses. There's still a shortage of HD content for many HD owners. Too few channels and on some of those, not everything is actually shown in HD.

I think the main difference between the HD wars and the DVD recordable wars is that far more people will be willing to embrace HD discs than recordable DVDs. Home DVD recorder sales have never been huge. Many people just see them as a slighlty more advanced VCR. A PVR, on the other hand, is a completely different story. Much better UIs, no worries about burning coasters, etc. Sure, taking content with you requires additional equipment like a recordable DVD, but timeshifting the content is good enough for most and the PVR does a much better job at that than your standard DVD burner.

However, issues like downrezzing are going to be sober wake-up calls for some consumers. Most of those affected will be upset that the shelf life of their TVs are much shorter than they had anticipated. Sure, they can still get HD content elsewhere, but there are moves on play to cutoff the analog loophole in areas beyond BR and HD-DVD.

I think it may take a while for either format to really take off. The PS3 will be a very intersting variable. You're going to have millions of BR players sold by way of the console even if the users don't care a lick about BR. It will certainly lend itself to quite a few people trying BR whereas they may have never bought a standalone player for either format. Whether that translates into a real boon for BR remains to be seen. It seems that the PS3 may be delayed, possibly because of the BR format itself.

Both formats have their issues though. MMC may not be included in either format's run of initial players and it's not 100% that those units will be software upgradeable. How MMC will actually play out is also unclear as the studios seem to have final say on if their content is copyable and perhaps even, at a price. First run HD-DVD titles won't have any of the next gen audio formats and will only have 1080i. Not that tons of displays support 1080p yet, but can't you see re-relases of those titles down the road at 1080p kind of like 4x3 letterbox titles when DVD first came out? Initial releases of BR titles may not be at the larger capacity disk sizes that have been touted as an advantage over HD-DVD. HDMI 1.3 isn't finalized yet and may not be until mid-year with uncertainty about whether 1.2 capable players on either side can be software upgraded after the spec is completed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mntneer View Post

Streaming could happen though, especially if they use MPEG4 for the compression, but it would have to be in a simple system that the average user can understand. I've streamed a couple SD movies recently via Media Center, and I have to say I was impressed with the quality, and how smoothly things went. Picture on my 37" LCD was not nearly as bad as I expected it to be, but I wouldn't have called it DVD quality either. The problem with streaming, or owning electronic versions only, is that I'm the type of consumer that ultimately likes to have the physical product to own. It's the pack rat in me, but I don't like the idea of not having a hard copy of something that I paid for, even if I'm 99% certain that the electronic copy I purchased will be available to me 24/7.

Streaming HD is an interesting possibility, but I don't think the studios are ready for it yet. You've seen some attempts here and there with downloadable movie services and we all know Apple is chomping at the bit to add movie content to ITMS. For HD , though, I think the studios would rather squeeze a round of disc based revenue out of consumers before they go to downloadable or streaming. Offering streaming solutions too soon may preemptively cutoff that source. If the disc market struggles, I could certainly see them do this as early as a 2-3 years after the disc formats officially roll out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mntneer View Post

But could that be attributed to how people's listening habits have changed when it comes to music? As someone who listens to very little music outside of the car, or with something other than headphones, I could careless about multi channel music, or music sampled at a high rate. But as someone that loves to watch movies, I'm slightly more interested in how those movies can be delivered to me, and the quality in which they are delivered.

Personally, I think the reason is two-fold. For one, MP3 and downloadable services exploded in the last few years. Even before the legal avenues, lots of folks were using Napster and its many clones. Seemingly, the desire for higher quality content by the masses was being trumped by portable enjoyment of content that could be obtained 24/7 even if it meant a trade-off in quality. The other reason is perceived benefit. When you compare SACD or DVD-A to CD as opposed to HD vs broadcast SD or even DVD, more consumers can perceive the difference and hence greater value of the visual medium vs the audible. Besides which, it's very easy to have HD on display for consumers to behold when you first walk in the door - the same isn't nearly as easy to merket with high quality audio.

Jeff
post #164 of 835
Thread Starter 
Yeah! So...

I sure hope Kaleidescape supports both formats soon after they hit the market...
post #165 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by iansilv View Post

Yeah! So...

I sure hope Kaleidescape supports both formats soon after they hit the market...

Depends on your definition of "soon after". Much of this ability for K or anyone else may depend on when and how MMC is implemented. The story I linked earlier in this thread:

http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/News...x?NewsId=16413

mentions that MMC is supposed to be part of the finalized AACS standard that should come later this year. So, there's likely going to be a delay after one or both are rolled out for MMC. Then there's the whole question of exactly what rights MMC will give us, will that vary from title to title (I sure as heck hope not - talk about confusing) and how much if anything will the privledge cost users?

Hardware is another factor. K probably will need a new player and at least one new reader. They'll also need to consider the HDMI spec issue. I'd be surprised to see support for either or both formats from K until next year. If HD-DVD had launched last holiday season as it was supposed to, this year would seem more likely. But with all the delays, it pushes everything back.

Jeff
post #166 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by iansilv View Post

Yeah! So...

I sure hope Kaleidescape supports both formats soon after they hit the market...


I heard they were only supporting 1 of the formats....
post #167 of 835
THey are currently supporting neither. but they are a member of both consortiums.
post #168 of 835
Adding HD-DVD to their reader would be fairly easy, since it would be backward compatible with reading DVD and CD.

We still have yet to see what MMC will entail. I dread the thought that they might try to make forcing ads as part of the price to pay to get MMC. Still, it is taking a while for both BluRay and HD-DVD to come to market and I think that expecting the second wave of supporting products to come to market undelayed is being overly optomistic.

At any rate, I think I would like to know a format is going to survive before I expend more than a few thousand dollars into it. Who knows what the costs are going to be for Kaleidescape to add support in terms of hardware/software engineering and license fees. I certainly wouldn't want to put down that much of my money on two horses before the race even really gets going knowing almost certainly one bet is going to be a dud.
post #169 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgbyhkr View Post

First run HD-DVD titles won't have any of the next gen audio formats and will only have 1080i.

This is incorrect. At least three HD DVD titles from Japan on March 28 will have next gen audio(DTS-HD 5.1). HD DVD player use unfiltered 1080i60 to transmit the 1080p24 movie content on the HD DVD disc to the display.

MMC only applies to the title and will be supported from day 1. Studios have a final say on the price. First gen player is not likely to support MC/MMC.

K already has an excellent infrastructure/UI for MMC/MC. If the server could meet the AACS requirement, the user may only need a new loader with AACS-key and a player to enjoy the next generation disc.
post #170 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by lymzy View Post

This is incorrect. At least three HD DVD titles from Japan on March 28 will have next gen audio(DTS-HD 5.1). HD DVD player use unfiltered 1080i60 to transmit the 1080p24 movie content on the HD DVD disc to the display.

Well, it looks like you are right on 1080p and I wasn't the only one confused. My statements came from an article I read on Ultimate AV Mag's site. Apparently the confusion was not isolated and the folks from Audiohlics asked Sage Schreiner (Microsoft's HD DVD Program Manager) about it in an interview from January:

http://www.audioholics.com/ces/CESte...Sinterview.php



"Audioholics: When does HD DVD plan to release 1080p output players? All of what we saw at the show was 1080i.

Sage: The HD DVD players announced so far will not support 1080p outputs -- yet. This is in part because the latest version of HDMI (the only one supporting 1080p as mandatory) is still being finalized. There are CE [consumer electronics] HD DVD players "in the works" that will ship later and are expected to have 1080p outputs, but nothing has yet been announced.

Also note that advanced 1080p displays can also do their own conversions from 1080i to progressive. There are no limitations in HD DVD as a format (i.e., both BD and HD DVD support the same native formats: 720p/60, 1080i/60, 1080p/30). It's only a player or a display issue whether there's a conversion to 1080p/60.

Finally, note that PC playback will always be progressive playback. Ditto the Toshiba laptop announced at CES; it will playback 1080p.

Audioholics: The second question I had is based n some feedback I received from the RCA booth whereby they indicated that the titles were not currently mastered in 1080p. Are you aware of whether the movie studios are planning on re-releasing HD DVD software titles in the 1080p format once the second generation players are available? The overarching question is - are the studios aware of any eventual plans for 1080p and the timeline for these second generation players?

Sage: The initial / first generation content will be encoded at 1920x1080p/24. Case in point, playback from a PC, right now, will output 1920x1080p/24 without doing any conversion steps.

The primary issues around encode quality are: quality of the source, encode method used, and bit rate. Modern codecs, like VC1, are capable of delivering a better quality encode at a more moderate bitrate than MPEG2. The primary limitation you will see with 1st generation movies in either format is the use of MPEG2 to encode, even at high bit rates. On a quality 1920x1080p display, MPEG2 will not look as good as VC1 (or H.264). Most (if not all) of what was on display in the HD DVD booths was VC1. You may want to investigate the actual encoding method of a given movie to really get a handle on its likely quality."




Apparently, the HDMI licensing group thought that Sage's comments laid too much blame at their feet, so they responded directly to it in a letter to Audioholics:

http://www.audioholics.com/news/edit...MIresponse.php

And then there's the interview from late February with Mark Knox, an adviser for the HD DVD promotion group and apparently Toshiba's goto PR guy for HD DVD:

http://www.hdtvmagazine.com/articles...view_-_mar.php

in which he says:


"HDTV Magazine: There are also people who are now wanting to buy 1080p monitors with 1080p inputs but they are finding that not so easy. Why?.

Mark Knox: There are more TVs with P on the front than connectors that can receive P in the back. It is an issue of standards that are evolving. Here is what I understand as of today (I am told I will learn more on an upcoming trip to Japan). We will develop documentation in Japan that we can deliver to you later explaining all of this issue. But here is what I now understand and then I will explain to you what I don't understand but hope to learn.

The current approved standard for HDMI is Ver 1.1. Within that version there are several mentions of some frame rates for 1080p, but they are listed as an optional specification. What that means is that if you are building a product you are allowed to support 1080p, but only at certain frame rates. But you are not required to support 1080p.

HDTV Magazine: What is required?

Mark Knox: That would be 1080i and below. Then there is a similar story when it comes to the higher resolution and lossless audio codecs. In Toshiba's case there is a very clear set of internal regulations for hardware. When they release a product it can be based only upon an existing mandatory specification. It is a very easy matter for you to allow the player to scale to whatever is native on the disk to 1080p at 24, 30 or 60 fps. But, if you do that there is no guarantee that the receiving device is going to know what to do with that data since with the current Ver 1.1 of HDMI there is no requirement that any device has to support any of those formats. For that reason, and the fact that Ver 1.1 will be the only certified standard for at least some months-well after we launch hardware in March-we are not willing to put 1080p output over the HDMI connector. "




As for the next gen audio formats, my comments also came from news articles I've seen online. It's certainly possible that thsoe were over generalizations stemming from the possibility that none of the mainstream titles from the hollywood studios contain the next gen audio formats. If that's the case then the end result is still the same. The titles most consumers are likely to buy in the initial release won't have them but might very well be re-released later with those formats and a few extras in a "Special" or "Collector's" edition like we've seen done with DVD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lymzy View Post

MMC only applies to the title and will be supported from day 1. Studios have a final say on the price. First gen player is not likely to support MC/MMC.

My comments were a little confusing here as it seems like I was talking about MMC as it relates to software. I did mean the hardware not supporting MMC initially. And yes, I wouldn't be surprised if first gen players are incapable of being upgraded to support MMC. Here's a another quote from the Mark Knox interview about how MMC will work:



"HDTV Magazine: What is it and how does 'managed copy' work?

Mark Knox: Managed copy in HD DVD means that every single disk must offer to the consumer the ability to make a legal encrypted copy of his/her disk in another location, most typically a media center PC.

HDTV Magazine: How is that controlled?

Mark Knox: Let's say you put a copy on your media center PC. That copy is still encrypted. In order to decrypt it you need a number of keys. One is the content key which is stored along with the (original) media. Another is a key which is unique to that PC derived from some unique element of that PC.

HDTV Magazine: What about my summer house?

Mark Knox: Several answers depending on your scenario.

If you have a portable device you can connect it to that same PC and use the managed copy to create a mobile copy (which you can play back on that mobile device). You can do that as long as that mobile device is able to "hand shake" with your media center PC (so they can hand the keys off). If that data file with the encrypted video were to be given to some other entity which won't connect directly the playback device to your computer (needed to successfully acquire all of the necessary keys), then you cannot make the copy.

HDTV Magazine: And do you think the public is going to earn their PhD in advanced cryptology with all of this?

Mark Knox:I think the process-the pain for the consumer to perform some of these operations-is going down. I agree that it is far from zero, but it is going down.

HDTV Magazine: Undoubtedly so, but ignorance doesn't vanish quickly.

Mark Knox: We could facetiously say that the acronym for DRM stands for 'Deal Required by Movie Makers.' To some degree we are constrained. We have to recognize that the majority of content owners selling high-def movies are American owned companies and the majority of those selling hardware are not! It is not like we can look to Congress to pursue the Hollywood community to drop their request. But it is also true that not all of the Hollywood content providers are going to throw that switch."




Quote:
Originally Posted by lymzy View Post

K already has an excellent infrastructure/UI for MMC/MC. If the server could meet the AACS requirement, the user may only need a new loader with AACS-key and a player to enjoy the next generation disc.

Agreed.

Jeff
post #171 of 835
Thread Starter 
slightly off topic- for anyonehere that owns a kaleidescape- how does it handle the extended edition versions of the lord of the rings films- is there an option to play the movie through seemlessly?
post #172 of 835
I think the ones I have are the extended versions (the ones where each film is a 4-disc set and the movie is spread across the first 2 discs). During playback, the K just plays straight through. Since all the data is on an HDD, there's no delay in switching discs. The system's smart anough to know that even though there are multiple discs, it's still a single title.

Separately, I also have the option to play each disc. that would be like popping in a disc into your DVD player and going through teh regular warning screens and Menu intro, etc. Normally, when you choose "Play Movie", you skip right to the start of the movie and skip all that garbage.

I also have noticed separately Play Movie options for films that have just a few minutes of extended content like a director's cut. For instance, on "Meet the Fockers", I have an option to "Play Theatrical Film" as well "Play Entended Edition" and "Play Disc".

Jeff
post #173 of 835
Jeff is correct. I would also like to add that when you have TV shows or other episodic content, it can "Play Episode" or "Play Episode #XX" or "Play All Episodes" and play episode will play one episode and it will remember which episdode you are on so the next time you select play episode, it will play the following episode. Play episode is the default play option for episodic content.
post #174 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Poindexter View Post

Jeff is correct. I would also like to add that when you have TV shows or other episodic content, it can "Play Episode" or "Play Episode #XX" or "Play All Episodes" and play episode will play one episode and it will remember which episdode you are on so the next time you select play episode, it will play the following episode. Play episode is the default play option for episodic content.

My wife loves this feature for that kind of content. It really makes TV show boxed sets that much more enjoyable. The fact that they list the episode names for each is also helpful rather than having to access the menu of each of the imported DVDs in order to find a specific episode.

Jeff
post #175 of 835
Quote:


Dennis,
Do you really believe that both BR and HDDVD will be dead by the fall of 2007 ? If so, why ?

Sorry...been on the road (and I haven't read all of the intervening comments.

Here's my reasoning.

Neither one of these 'technologies' is really nothing outstanding. Just a higher density, higher bit rate problem with a form factor constraint...nothing innovative on, let's say, the scale of the Arpanet or the work from the old Xerox labs. None the less, the engineers addressed the issue.

But now, hubris has entered the equation. Rather than introducing an enabling technology, the marketing/CEO and corporate pride people have entered the fray and, rather than thinking about the consumer, have engaged in a format fight that the consuming public has absolutely no interest in, and further, are less likely to drop the money for any high priced early release player which has equal odds of loosing the battle (in the end, neither one of these formats is nothing more than "enabling" and there's really nothing which makes one format significantly superior to the other). So, the public doesn't want to hear about it, isn't going to be willing to drop $$$ into the pot until a winner is declared and the studios aren't going to go full bore into production on either format for exactly the same reason (they want market share). In the end, the money won't be there.

In the meanwhile, while the two camps are being silly children, other industry players are moving forward with formats (supporting streaming, download, PC, and hard media) which are less expensive, more efficient, and currently available (at least in one case). Microsoft and Apple are not to be ignored. If you examine WMV, it provides HD on current media, provides license/copy protection, and meets the studios/distributors desires of an online distribution format for new releases. In this case, you have a single format providing HD in streaming (internet, Sat, Cable), download, broadcast, and hard media. You can also be certain Apple is NOT ignoring this market. While the HD-DVD and BluRay camps are focused on killing each other (they will), they're going to get nailed over the top of the head by one of these two other players (or both).

In the end, the market for HD-DVD and BluRay will NOT develop to allow either format to survive longer than just a curosity item. Every week we hear some one is one camp or the other, someone else is in both camps, or someone is riding on the fence. There will not be enough players to justify production (and long lists of titles), and with uncertainty and a lack of titles, the consumer will not be on board and the vicious circle begins.

I've already seen the first HD music video on a format not HD or Blu and it cost me nothing to play it in my HD theater. These formats will die almost as fast as DIVX.
post #176 of 835
Hey -- does anyone have a new K system with music capability? Do you need a separate player for each zone in the house? This would seem to be really expensive if so.
post #177 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted W View Post

Hey -- does anyone have a new K system with music capability? Do you need a separate player for each zone in the house? This would seem to be really expensive if so.

The video players can handle the music playback functions as well as video playback. They also have a new, 4-zone audio only piece that has a built-in reader which they are working on and displayed at CES.

Jeff
post #178 of 835
I saw the music version (or capability) at CES and it was fantastic, as you might expect. I wonder what the price and dates for the audio-only system will be.
post #179 of 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted W View Post

I saw the music version (or capability) at CES and it was fantastic, as you might expect. I wonder what the price and dates for the audio-only system will be.

I could be very wrong, but I don't think they will offer an audio only solution, at least not in the forseeable future. If they did, the cost would be substantial and almost certainly much more expensive than anything comparable. The cost of the K server alone without drives would be way over any current audio server and I haven't seen anything suggesting that they are looking to put out a component like aplayer with a HDD built-in.

Jeff
post #180 of 835
I have been running the music system for a while. I think it was scheduled to be out of beta on the 1st. I am not certain if it got pushed out or not, but if not it should be any day now.

I do not yet have the audio only player, but the movie player does also play back the audio and has the great video user interface. The 4-zone audio only player will not have video to my understanding. I will know better when I get my hands on a production unit of the audio player.
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AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Ultra Hi-End HT Gear ($20,000+) › Kaleidescape- how will it handle Bluray and HD DVD with hdcp?