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LG Considers Combo Blu-ray/HD DVD Player, drops BD199 - Page 2  

post #31 of 70
Its been my misfortune to see an LG DVD player and VHS deck in action..... picture quality on both was spectacularly bad ( compared to what i'm used to and of course only my opinion )

I would not buy an LG product even if Pamela Anderson turned up at my door wearing the sexiest lingerie imaginable and promised me the ride of my life if i bought LG..... not even if hell froze over and cats and dogs started seeing each other would i buy LG.......... Not even if Dick Cheney showed up with his gun ......... never ever would i buy LG.

As you can tell i'm not a fan of LG products.
post #32 of 70
Apparently for you, LG doesn't stand for 'Lifes Good'. :)
post #33 of 70
My LG 4163B writer has never burned a coaster. YMMV
post #34 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Issac Hunt
All three codecs are mandatory for both formats. This information has been well known for a long time now...
Yes, it has. Now, where are the tools for AVC and VC-1 for studios to master content in anything BUT MPEG-2? Answer: there aren't any. I have to think that even Grubert would agree that you will get only MPEG-2 content on BD in 2006, barring Sonic pulling a miracle out of its hat.

Quote:
Incidentally from the sounds of things it seems that Warner's Blu-ray titles will probably be encoded in AVC, if that gets anyone moist.
Which sounds are these? The ones where Amir talks about how deeply involved MSFT is in "helping" Warner produce content in VC-1? The ones where Warner executives are quoted as saying that they will release titles on Blu Ray in the indefinite future on VC-1? My hearing must not be that good. Otherwise, please post the link back to where Warner people talk about AVC.

Later,
Bill
post #35 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grubert
My LG 4163B writer has never burned a coaster. YMMV
My LG 4200a OTA hdtv tuner is the best there is...bar none, and gets me every major channel and in some cases two versions...through 90 ft trees from the broadcast antennas 50 miles away.

So at least in some cases, LG does make some great product.
post #36 of 70
We posted this on our site yesterday and wanted to follow up and say that we will be interviewing someone from LG tomorrow morning. Hopefully get the full details.
post #37 of 70
Hmmm, if LG comes thru with this I would hold off buying my BR player until a dual format player is available. I had planned on buying both HD-DVD and Blu Ray players but if this LG story bears fruit then I’d only buy the HD-DVD player (since it is first to market) with the idea that I’d get to at least view some HD content with a minimum loss until the LG is out. I look forward to seeing where this goes…
post #38 of 70
If the Samsung rep did mis-speak, and a licensee of either format is not expressly prohibited from manufacturing a combo player, why would LG -- a manufacturer that is not exactly known for developing cutting edge DVD players -- be the first (maybe only) one moving ahead on such a proposition? Could it be that they are so flush with thin-panel revenue that they feel there's nothing to stop them...the old "Can Do" mentality? Maybe they are oblivious to the subtle political realities. They may need to change their tune later when critical parts become mysteriously unavailable.
post #39 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
Maybe they are oblivious to the subtle political realities.
OTOH, it may just be a one-up on Samsung - their main domestic rival. They want to do something that Samsung couldn't.
post #40 of 70
Quote:
why would LG -- a manufacturer that is not exactly known for developing cutting edge DVD players -- be the first (maybe only) one moving ahead on such a proposition?
LG won't be the only one. Samsung was the first one to announce a combo player. Being cross-town rivals, Samsung will now definitely release a combo player to counter LG. Then HD-DVD playback would become the norm across all Blu-Ray machines.
post #41 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
...why would LG -- a manufacturer that is not exactly known for developing cutting edge DVD players -- be the first (maybe only) one moving ahead on such a proposition?
Or they have the opportunity to OEM to several other CE companies?
post #42 of 70
Clearly many of you do not understand how big LG is. Trust me many of the optical drives you see under different brands are LG below. LG makes some of the best LCDs out there..good enough for Apple's Cinema display. Sometimes OEM is the pathway to making an amazing amount of money. I'd trust LG based on my experiences.
post #43 of 70
All you have to look at is DVD-R +R debacle. I don't think you can buy a dedicated -R or +R drives anymore. Every drive out there is a combo drive. As to which format ultimately survives, do you care if you own a combo???
post #44 of 70
My point is both formats have their development origins in Japan. The Japanese progenitors (Sony-Philips/Toshiba) are not going to let the Koreans introduce combo players until they are ready. Typically at the introduction of new technologies, the Japanese developers keep tight control over the supply of key components and devices needed to manufacture the product. If they get an inkling that a Korean OEM is building a combo player, they will simply become severely backordered on these proprietary and patented parts.
post #45 of 70
Two-format race for next DVD standard is wide open

Quote:
Consumer electronics maker LG Electronics and PC maker Fujitsu-Siemens both said on Thursday they would keep their options open after computer giant Hewlett-Packard said last month it would back HD DVD as well as Blu-ray.
Quote:
LG Electronics, one of the world's biggest optical drive makers and previously firmly in the Blu-ray camp, said it would prepare for both formats. But the firm said it was "still one of the strongest supporters of Blu-ray".
Quote:
Matsushita, which sells its products under the Panasonic and JVC brands, said its new Blu-ray players would be priced somewhere between Samsung's and feature-rich models from the likes of Pioneer at prices above $1,500.
post #46 of 70
Isn't LG merged with Philips or something like that? I think in Korea, LG is known as LG Philips or is that a separate company that just manufactures LCD?
post #47 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerHT
In the end, a dual format launch is bad for consumer, bad for business and bad for market penetration. Buy BD. HD-DVD go dig a hole in the ground and stay there.

Per
Touchy, touchy! - And wrong!

Dual format is much better for the consumer, as it gives them more choice.

However, it will also accelerate the end of the format war.

In this case (IMHO) dual-format is bad for BluRay. So no wonder the reaction here.
post #48 of 70
Quote:
In this case (IMHO) dual-format is bad for BluRay. So no wonder the reaction here.
It's bad for both, because it means we'll end up with a rehash of DVD-A/SACD with their universal players.
post #49 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBlacklow
It's bad for both, because it means we'll end up with a rehash of DVD-A/SACD with their universal players.
I think this would prove out as it has time and again. VIDEO outpaces AUDIO in general. People will pay for better video all the time and only some of the time for better audio.
post #50 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4K display
LG Electronics, one of the world's biggest optical drive makers and previously firmly in the Blu-ray camp, said it would prepare for both formats. But the firm said it was "still one of the strongest supporters of Blu-ray".
And then promptly announced it had shelved plans to produce their LG 199 BluRay player - can't anyone tell when someone is just being tactful?....
post #51 of 70
So you're saying it's different than when Warner announced they were going to be releasing Blu-Ray? Methinks you're just seeing what you want to see. Tell me if this doesn't sound very similar:
Quote:
Cardwell denied industry speculation that Warner and Paramount Home Entertainment, the latter of which announced earlier this month that the studio would also publish in both formats, are simply keeping a foot in the HD DVD camp in case Sony cannot deliver on its promises...“We’re committed to HD DVD,†Cardwell said.
post #52 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBlacklow
So you're saying it's different than when Warner announced they were going to be releasing Blu-Ray? Methinks you're just seeing what you want to see. Tell me if this doesn't sound very similar:
:) Touche! - But the difference is they diddn't announce that they WOULDN'T be producing the HD DVD titles :cool:
post #53 of 70
Quote:
As to which format ultimately survives, do you care if you own a combo???
yes. DVD+/-R don't have a large overhead, most of the specs are DVD and so are common, the royalties to + or - are mostly on the disk. So if you buy + disks then you pay + royalties to the + group and the opposite if you buy -. Also since not all drives are combo it can add to complexity (i.e. if your DVD player is +, PC is - and laptop is combo then you would need to buy the sort depending on most likely secondary use - used on PC or DVD player?)

you might ask, is complexity important? I would say extremely. Don't forget that the most likely player in most homes in the next 3-5 years will be a PS3 that is only BD. So chances are most homes will have at least one BD only player. If they buy the Toshiba (cheaper) then they also end up with a HD-DVD only device. If Samsung was honest and a combo player will most likely be close(if not higher) to BD + HD-DVD in price we also end up that it won't be cheap.

The last point is not only do we

1) add useless cost so more companies can make more money for nothing
2) add complexity

but also two more important stuff

3) extend the format war until the only choice is combos (where at that point in time we can't talk about a public war any more)

and the longer the war the more likely that no side will win

4) +/- only has a handful of disk manufacturers a store can limit to a few brands. With movies if Universal makes a BD and HD-DVD and DVD and UMD of LOTR then the store needs to carry all four and make them easy to find. And what if LOTR comes out in extended and normal? then that number goes up to 8. The inventory for stores, rental places becomes much harder to handle. Assuming all studios eventually go release in BD/HD-DVD/DVD all three at the same time, the stores/rental place inventory just tripled in title management
post #54 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyP
where at that point in time we can't talk about a public war any more
Would this really be so bad? It would be like we would have to go and watch our home theaters, or something. :D

<cue up Naughty by Nature>

Who's down with L-G-E? Yeah, you know me... :)
post #55 of 70
I don't think many consumers care so much about formats...... however, many like myself would prefer high definition movies at home in general over SD 480i format. This is where the universal player can play a big roll and boom High Definition Movie market. Regardless of the format, high definition movies will have a chance to battle SD DVD format and prove itself to the market. Don't forget that the battle isn't just against HD-DVD vs. BR-DVD, but battle against SD-DVD will be even more intense. There are so many great upconverting SD DVD players on the market that can be bought a lot less than HD-DVD or BR-DVD players at the roll-out price.

One fear factor I see is that many BR-DVD titles will be mere transfer of the current MPEG2 format to the BR-DVD discs and will not show much benefit compared to the same SD-DVD titles being upconverted. This will happen with most existing DVD titles and will kill the experience for early BR-DVD consumers. However, most MPEG4 format will have to be remastered or converted to the new format and will have an edge in the PQ and will falsely show better PQ over BR-DVD titles with a bad transfer.

For me, I would prefer BR-DVD on the HTPC due to it's storage capacity, but as to consider stand alone player, the universal players seems to fit the need. I can also see BR-DVD fitting well with the video/audiophiles with all the lostless audio features, but this translates to $ for most consumers and many will not go out and buy a new receiver just to play movie with lostless audio and even if they do..... their systems may not be capable of resolving such fine improvements. Either way.... Universal players sounds great to start the battle.... I don't think the battle will end......... If SACD and DVD-Audio can coexist..... then why can't HD-DVD and BR-DVD do the same.... I'm sure many of you own universal players like myself to play both formats....
post #56 of 70
Quote:
Would this really be so bad? It would be like we would have to go and watch our home theaters, or something.
where did I say that was a negative? that was in parenthesis and usually that means it is not as important. I was just adding that if all players are combos there is no consumer side format war any more (there can still be one on the studio side, I am sure Sony would prefer studios use BD and Toshiba they use HD-DVD) What I said is that until all players are combos it can extend the consumer format war. For example if MS only has an HD-DVD add-on and PS3 only BD, if you buy a combo player and you have 360 or PS3 you might have a preference for disks and so the format war is still on until all the players/recorders are combos. And for me anything that extends the war is bad
post #57 of 70
bitemymac:

1) it is BD there is no such thing as BR-DVD

2) no one starts from DVD they always start transfers from the D5 or the original film. There is .00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 0000001 % possibility that any of the movies will come from an upconverted DVD. Even if you assume it is a possibility then why would you assume that it is more likely with BD then HD-DVD? To go DVD->MPEG2-1080p or DVD->AVC or DVD->VC-1 it would be the same process and complexity. You would need to decode the DVD MPEG-2, upscale and deinterlace the stream and then reencode it to one of the 3 codecs. It is not like there is a button that is titled DVD->1080p
post #58 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBlacklow
It's bad for both, because it means we'll end up with a rehash of DVD-A/SACD with their universal players.
Okay, remind me,what are DVD-A and SACD :) ? Were they before or after 8 track :) ?

Seriously, are you saying that both formats will fail if there is a combo player?
post #59 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnu
Okay, remind me,what are DVD-A and SACD :) ? Were they before or after 8 track :) ?

Seriously, are you saying that both formats will fail if there is a combo player?
First there has to be a combo player to buy, then you have to count on people buying the LG brand name.
I am counting on neither of the above.
post #60 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Earz
First there has to be a combo player to buy, then you have to count on people buying the LG brand name.
I am counting on neither of the above.
Oh please... so LG were just faking when they said they would drop the 199 BD player, and they were just joshing when they said they were looking at combo. So Sony was just kidding when they said they would bring out this thing called BluRay?

I agree with Johnu - it's obvious BOTH formats won't fail, and I think most sensible people will think dual format players are a good thing. It will also accelerate the end of the format war.

Why is the BD camp so upset by this development? hmmmm...
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