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Streaming video from PC->HDTV via IEEE 1394 DTVLink...  

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Is this possible? And if so, what hardware/software would I need to accomplish this?
post #2 of 13
very interested in the answers to this one
but not sure WinXP is up for it .... it can only detect devices like DVHS tape decks, but disply to firewire should require a firewire Display Adapter ...
post #3 of 13
MyHD can decode mpeg2 via firewire (with firewire card installed), but it cannot decode if the signal is 5C encrypted. It is not able to decode MPEG4.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Tks for the replies Kei and pyro2003,

MyHD is an interesting thought, Kei. I wonder how well that would communicate with a DTV Link connector though? Might be a little redundant since most displays with DTV Link should (I think) probably already have their own internal tuners. But if it can communicate properly and perhaps be used to playback other video content in addition to HD programming via the DTV Link connector, then I suppose it would be worth considering.

I looked at the original MyHD as a possible high-rez playback solution for DVI/Component way back when, but passed on it because the only HD files it seemed to support were transport streams, which did not seem very easy/affordable to create at the time. Maybe that's changed though.

So far, the only software I've run across that seems designed for doing playback (and recording, which is less important to me) from a PC via DTV Link is a program from Vividlogic called Firebus DTV Recorder (aka DTVR), which essentially emulates the behavior of a DVR on your PC via firewire. This also uses transport streams. And reviews of Firebus in the DVR forum seem to be rather mixed.

I'm a total noob to firewire though, so there could be other options out there as well that I've overlooked. If the firewire link on the display supports other formats/connections than just DTV, then perhaps there might be some other software solutions that would work for playback. While searching around for info on this, I noticed for example that there are a number of NLEs and other small capture/record utilities (WinDV, DVIO) which can send and receive DV and/or HDV via firewire from camcorders and tape decks. When I spoke to Toshiba though (the display I'm lookin at is a Tosh 42HP95 plasma), they said the IEEE 1394 ports on their displays would only work with a DTV device, and not with DV or HDV. And it seems like the only devices which are designed to communicate with it (at the moment anyway) are DVRs.

Another possibility suggested elsewhere was VLC, which is a mediaplayer that also supports network streaming of video. Whether it would be compatible with a DTV Link firewire connector though, I don't know.

The concept behind DTV Link is actually rather neat --provide a secure high-def digital video connection that can be controlled by just a few VCR-style buttons on your TV's remote-- but the support so far for it is a little disappointing. So I guess I can see why Toshiba decided to drop these connections from it's '06 plasmas.
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pyro2003
very interested in the answers to this one
but not sure WinXP is up for it .... it can only detect devices like DVHS tape decks, but disply to firewire should require a firewire Display Adapter ...
Again I am a newb to this, but based on the stuff I've looked at, and provided you have some DTV-savvy software and drivers, it appears the only hardware needed would be a fairly plain vanilla firewire card (if your PC doesn't have a firewire connector already).

Hardware requirements for DTVR.

The limitations seem to be more on the software end.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
not sure WinXP is up for it
FYI, I also recall reading somewhere that IEEE 1394 connections may be configured for only 100MBPS by default in XP [edit: w/SP2], and a Microsoft patch should enable higher speeds.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
not sure WinXP is up for it
FYI, I also recall reading somewhere that IEEE 1394 connections may be configured for only 100MBPS by default in XP [w/SP2], and there's a Microsoft patch for re-enabling higher speeds.

Edit: FWIW, here's the post where this came up:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post7267724
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU
FYI, I also recall reading somewhere that IEEE 1394 connections may be configured for only 100MBPS by default in XP [w/SP2], and there's a Microsoft patch for re-enabling higher speeds.

Edit: FWIW, here's the post where this came up:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post7267724
any luck ADU with this work ?

I'm just wonder if the firewire can reduce noise so beat my analogue cables from the graphics card (Winfast 6600GT, with cheesy s-video like connector going into component RCAs) However this is more convenient than MyHD because the Windoze GUI would be accessible at once.

Having said that firewire mpeg2 going straight to my Sony via ilink does shift the Digital to Analogue conversion to the Sony HDTV which might (or might not) do a better job than a $200 graphics card
post #9 of 13
To me, the Transport Stream limitation of the MyHD is irrelevant because DTV Link Firewire requires exactly the same thing. Streaming anything on firewire requires packetizing and multiplexing. This is already done in a transport stream file. If you wanted to play a file that was not already a transport stream, you would have to do it in real time. This can be done for SD NTSC sources by the JVC D-VHS decks that have encoders. I don't know of any consumer equipment that can do the same for HD sources. The software to do good transport stream multiplexing is also expensive and is not designed to be real time.

DVI or HDMI is the right way to get a digital path from your PC to your display. However, it sounds like your display doesn't have one of those inputs. You may be pleasantly surprised with the Component out from current video cards. I have also had good luck with a good quality RGB-Component transcoder.

- Mike
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by miimura
...
DVI or HDMI is the right way to get a digital path from your PC to your display. However, it sounds like your display doesn't have one of those inputs. You may be pleasantly surprised with the Component out from current video cards. I have also had good luck with a good quality RGB-Component transcoder.

- Mike
Thanks for the comments, Mike !

Just to clarify, do you mean RGB-component transcoding works better than the native component video out of the graphics card ? I have a avsforum & a keydigital transcoder that I have gathered over the years but haven't tested yet !

Incidentally is also a firewire trancoder from Canopus for HD though :
http://www.canopus.com/products/HDSC1/index.php
but probably quite expensive and mostly for DV

regards
post #11 of 13
Without using Firebus about all a windows XP computer can do is exchange video with a DVHS recorder or HDV camcorder and receive the stream from some cable boxes and TVs when the steam is labeled copy freely. That is covered here http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=403695 and lots more info in the HDTV recorders section.
Also DVI or HDMI recording are covered in the recording section and the short answer is that can not be received in a computer or recorded.
John
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by pyro2003
Thanks for the comments, Mike !

Just to clarify, do you mean RGB-component transcoding works better than the native component video out of the graphics card ? I have a avsforum & a keydigital transcoder that I have gathered over the years but haven't tested yet !

Incidentally is also a firewire trancoder from Canopus for HD though :
http://www.canopus.com/products/HDSC1/index.php
but probably quite expensive and mostly for DV

regards
pyro,
That Canopus box is definitely NOT Firewire. It's a HD-SDI to Component transcoder, which is a VERY VERY different animal. It operates on uncompressed HD digital signal and it's basically a fancy Digital-Analog converter. HD-SDI is a gigabit speed serial digital interface that's used to connect HD broadcast cameras to HD broadcast recorders like the HDCAM system.

I use the "AVS Transcoder" from Crescendo and it does a great job for me. I use it because I have a MyHD card that I wanted to use in passthru mode. My video card is also so old that it does not have native component output. The transcoder is not necessarily better or worse than the Component out from a current video card.

- Mike
post #13 of 13
you're right Mike, I was assuming (and wrongly so) because canopus always make these DV boxes like ADC100 or 110

recording is not a big deal for me, just displaying high quality output :p
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